Tag Archives: Madrid

Featured Exhibition: La España de Laurent (1856–1886). Un paseo fotográfico por la historia, Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando, Madrid, until 31 March 2019

Jean Laurent, known in Spain as Juan Laurent, is a fundamental figure in the history of Spanish photography and one of the pioneers of the medium in Europe. Born in Burgundy, Laurent moved to Madrid from Paris in 1844. In 1856 he opened a studio at 39 Carrera de San Jerónimo, previously the address of Charles Clifford, another famous early photographer. Laurent’s photographs portrayed Spain at a time of great political, social and cultural change. The holdings of his company, Casa Laurent y Cía, were acquired by the Ministerio de Cultura in 1975. This exhibition offers a wide-ranging introduction to this vast personal collection.

Click here for more information.

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Maius Workshop Meeting: Alex Letvin, ‘Baroque Rivals? Zurbarán and Murillo Between Seville and Madrid’

The next meeting of the Maius Workshop will take place on 18 February, 5–6pm, in the Research Forum, Courtauld Institute of Art, Vernon Square, Penton Rise, Kings Cross, London WC1X 9EW (*Please note the change of address).

Alex Letvin, Andrew W. Mellon and Maude de Schauensee Postdoctoral Curatorial Fellow in the Department of European Painting and Sculpture at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, will discuss work-in-progress research on Spanish Golden Age painters Zurbarán and Murillo. 

Maius is a friendly platform for informal dialogue and collaborative research. Our sessions are open to all, and research in early stages of development is especially welcome. We look forward to seeing you at Alex’s presentation, and please feel free to email us with ideas and suggestions for future events.

200 Years of the Museo del Prado, 1819–2019

On 19 November 1819 Ferdinand VII of Spain inaugurated the Museo Real de Pinturas. Over the following two centuries, the new institution would turn into the Museo Nacional del Prado, one of the world’s most visited museums with an unparalleled collection of around 8,200 drawings, 7,600 paintings, 4,800 prints, and 1,000 sculptures.

The Museum will celebrate its anniversary with several exhibitions and events over the course of the year. Highlights of the programme are:

Current exhibitions

Museo del Prado 1819–2019. A place of memory, Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid, until 10 March 2019

lmd8988This exhibition opens the anniversary celebrations by offering a survey of the museum’s history that focuses on the dialogue between the Museum and society; heritage policies in Spain; the trends that have guided the growth of the museum’s collection and its transformation into a place that has allowed Spanish and foreign writers, intellectuals and artists to reflect on the country’s past and its collective identity.

Velázquez and the Golden AgeCaixaForum, Barcelona, until 3 March 2019

1aec4fcf-3625-450e-bf34-d074d781c69bArt at the court of Philip IV was an international language devoid of local boundaries. The work of Velázquez after 1623 is best understood in this international context. He was deeply influenced by paintings in the royal collections, especially works by Titian, Tintoretto and Rubens. One of his key experiences was the trip to Rome in 1629 where he encountered classical and Renaissance art and established contacts with his contemporaries in Italy. The exhibition underscores such internationalism through a selection of 61 paintings associated with Velázquez, the Spanish royal collections and the Spanish Golden Age. More than twenty of these works were painted by Italian, Flemish and French artists, including Titian, Rubens, Luca Giordano, Jan Brueghel, Anthonis Mor, Giovanni Lanfranco, Claude Lorrain, Salvator Rosa, Massimo Stanzione and Guido Reni. Spanish artists are represented through works by Ribera, Zurbarán, Murillo, Alonso Cano, Pereda, Maíno, Sánchez Coello, Mazo, Van der Hamen and others.

Forthcoming exhibitions

El maestro de papel. Cartillas españolas para aprender a dibujar de los siglos XVII y XVIII [The paper teacher. Spanish Drawing Manuals of the 17th and 18th Centuries], Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid, from 15 October 2019 to 2 February 2020

2f86f58c9a8eaae8237c3c1faff98bc8This exhibition focuses on Spanish drawing manuals of the 17th and 18th centuries, locating them in their international context. These rare and innovative manuals responded to changing trends in the theory and practice of art. While such learning aids were produced across Europe, this exhibition will highlight the unique features of Spanish examples through works by José de Ribera, Pedro de Villafranca y Malagón, José García Hidalgo, Friar Matías de Irala and José López Enguídanos.

Solo la voluntad me sobra. Drawings by Goya, Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid, from 19 November 2019 to 16 February 2020

d70b6af5-5b03-b189-cd11-ca0040d4325fThis exhibition is the result of the research undertaken for the publication of a new catalogue raisonné of Goya’s drawings, a subject to which the Museo del Prado has always devoted particular attention and which is one of the keystones of its collection. The exhibition will bring together more than 100 drawings by Goya from the Prado’s own collections and from public and private ones around the world. It will be presented as an extensive chronological survey of the master’s oeuvre, ranging from the Italian Sketchbook to the Bordeaux Albums. It will also offer an up-to-date vision of the ideas that recurrently appear in Goya’s work, revealing the ongoing and long-lasting relevance of his thinking.

Sofonisba Anguissola y Lavinia Fontana. Dos modelos de mujeres artistasMuseo Nacional del Prado, Madrid 22 October 2019 to 2 February 2020

39265f92-e9b3-6f56-3ee3-54fcbb8bab6cThe exhibition will reveal the artistic personality of two of the most outstanding women artists in western art. Through a total of 60 works and for the first time, the Museo del Prado will jointly present the most important paintings by Sofonisba Anguissola (c. 1535–1625) and Lavinia Fontana (1552–1614). The two artists achieved recognition and fame among their contemporaries for and despite their status as female painters. Both were able to break away from the prevailing stereotypes assigned to women in relation to artistic practice and the deep-rooted scepticism regarding women’s creative and artistic abilities. In particular, Sofonisba Anguissola had close connections with the Spanish court as tutor to Queen Elizabeth of Valois and later official court painter to King Philip II.

Their Majesties’ Retiring Room, Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid 9 April 2019 to 24 November 2019

bfb4ca28-f763-c08f-97af-55b7416e5c2eThis exhibition project will recreate the original aspect of Room 39, known as Their Majesties’ Retiring Room. First opened in 1828, it was intended as a portrait gallery of the Bourbon Dynasty. The images on display were accompanied by still lifes, floral compositions and landscapes and by other paintings that depict events from the reigns of Charles III and Ferdinand VII. This installation will recreate the hanging of the paintings at different heights and will include some of the furnishings made for this space, including Ferdinand VII’s toilet.

Velázquez, Rembrandt, Vermeer. Miradas afines en España y Holanda [Velázquez, Rembrandt, Vermeer. Shared perspectives in Spain and the Low Countries], Museo Nacional del Prado, 25 June 2019 to 29 September 2019

0c80874a-3a0c-89ed-ff82-003ecc34c090This exhibition on late 16th- and early 17th-century Dutch and Spanish painting is the result of an extensive and important research project on the part of the Museum arising from a collaborative agreement with the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, which will be lending a significant group of works. The exhibition will offer a reflection on the pictorial traditions represented by Spain and the Low Countries. While Dutch art-historical literature has considered these traditions as essentially different, this exhibition will aim to juxtapose the historical myths and artistic realities of the two countries and to reflect on the numerous traits that they share. In order to appreciate these parallels the exhibition will include major works by artists such as Velázquez, Rembrandt, Ribera, Frans Hals and Vermeer.

Permanent Displays and Other Projects

Prado 200Museo Nacional del Prado and online, from 1 November 2019

6a2874c8-2b1b-2995-ea7b-6a627c68ad6aPrado 200 is a new feature within the museum’s permanent display. This installation is presented as nine chronological sections which will present the museum’s history with an emphasis on its architecture, public image and its principal exhibitions and activities. Curated by Victor Cageao, it will include works of art and documentary material from the permanent collection and from the holdings of the Museum’s archive and library (paintings, sculptures, prints, photographs, documents, architectural models, plans, etc.), displayed in Rooms 100, 101 and 102 of the Villanueva Building. It will be accompanied by a specially designed online timeline providing access to graphic and technical documentation on the Museum’s history.

Memoria audiovisual del Museo del Prado and Voces del Prado. Una historia oral 

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The video Memoria audiovisual del Museo del Prado present a selection of films and other television programmes filmed in the Museo del Prado, from 1907 to today. Voces del Prado. Una historia oral collects the oral history of the museum through interviews with employees, from the 1940s to today.

 

 

On Tour through Spain, various locations, until 8 December 2019screenshot 2019-01-22 at 12.19.26

As part of the project De gira por España, important works from the Prado collection will be on loan to a series of provincial museums, one for each of Spain’s autonomous regions or autonomous cities. Click here to find an interactive map of the loans.

 

 

And ARTES?

ARTES plans to join the party and organise events to celebrate the Prado’s birthday, for example in this year’s Glendinning lecture, by Javier Barón, Two Masters of the Prado: Velázquez, El Greco and Modern Painting. We have also changed our cover image to El Museo Del Prado, a painting by José Franco Cordero dated to c. 1890. The work, in the collection of the Madrid’s history museum, shows the Museum’s north façade before the construction of a new entrance designed by Francisco Jareño and completed around 1892. The church of San Jerónimo el Real is visible in the background. Click here for more information on this work.

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José Franco Cordero, El Museo Del Prado, c. 1890, Museo de Historia, Madrid. Creative Commons – Reconocimiento-NoComercial 2.5 España (CC BY-NC 2.5)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Conference: Las mujeres y las artes en la corte española, Madrid, 20–22 February 2019, Universidad Complutense, Madrid

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Programme

MIÉRCOLES, 20 DE FEBRERO

09:30 Registro de participantes

10:00 Inauguración. Jaime M. de los Santos. Consejero de Cultura, Turismo y Deporte. Comunidad de Madrid. Presentación.  Miguel Luque. Decano de la Facultad.

MESA I. MUJERES PROTAGONISTAS DE LAS ARTES.
MODERA FÉLIX DÍAZ MORENO (UCM)

10:30 Plautilla Bricci: cronaca di un oblio. Consuelo Lollobrigida (Univ. of Arkansas – William J. Fulbright School of Arts and Sciences)

11:00  Pintoras flamencas en los siglos XVI y XVII: las sagas familiares y el talento. Ana Diéguez-Rodríguez (Instituto Moll. Centro de investigación en pintura flamenca Univ. de Burgos)

11:30  Pausa café

12:30  Vidas y afanes de las dos impresoras novohispanas del siglo XVIII: Rosa Teresa Poveda y Manuela de la Ascensión Cerezo. Marina Garone Gravier (Instituto de Investigaciones Bibliográficas, Univ. Nacional Autónoma de México)

13:00  Mujeres artistas en la Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Carlos de Valencia. Mariángeles Pérez-Martín (Univ. de València)

13:30  Debate. Comida

MESA II. IDENTIDADES FEMENINAS, GENERADORAS DE ESPACIOS.
MODERAN CONCEPCIÓN LOPEZOSA APARICIO (UCM) Y SARA FUENTES LÁZARO (UNIV. A DISTANCIA DE MADRID)

16:00 De la casa al hogar. Aposentos femeninos en la Edad Moderna. Gloria Franco Rubio (UCM)

16:30 “Fare scena della casa”. Isabel de Farnesio y la arquitectura pintada en La Granja de San Ildefonso. Sara Fuentes Lázaro (Univ. a Distancia de Madrid)

17:00 Sociabilidad, ciudad y género en la crisis del Antiguo Régimen. Aproximaciones desde la cultura visual y material. Álvaro Molina (Univ. Nacional de Educación a Distancia)

17:30 “Mujeres en el límite”. Presencias femeninas en el Paseo del Prado de Madrid. Concepción Lopezosa Aparicio (UCM)

18:00 Debate

JUEVES, 21 DE FEBRERO

MESA III. LAS ARTES Y LA PRÁCTICA DEL PODER
MODERAN MAGDALENA DE LAPUERTA (UCM) Y MIGUEL HERMOSO CUESTA (UCM)

10:00 Il mecenatismo di Bona Sforza alla corte di Bari nella prima metà del ‘500. Mimma Pasculli (Univ. degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro. Dpto. Lettere, Lingue e Arti)

10:30 Sofonisba Anguissola y la construcción de una imagen femenina para la familia Habsburgo. Jorge Sebastián Lozano (Univ. de València)

11:00 Patrimonio y encargos artísticos de Juana Cortés, II duquesa de Alcalá. Sergio Ramiro Ramírez (UCM)

11:30 Debate

12:00 Pausa café

12:30 La perla de la Monarquía hispana: Margarita de Austria y el retrato cortesano. Magdalena de Lapuerta Montoya (UCM)

13:00  Sor Ana Dorotea de Austria y la exaltación de las mujeres fuertes. Cipriano García-Hidalgo Villena (UCM)

13:30  María Isabel de Braganza y la música. Judith Ortega Rodríguez (ICCMU-UCM)

14:00  Debate. Comida

WORKSHOP (LUGAR: SALA DE JUNTAS). CUARTOS DE MUJERES. ESPACIOS DONDE VIVIR Y TRABAJAR EN EL SIGLO XVI

16:30  Presentación a cargo de Beatriz Blasco Esquivias (UCM). Intervienen: Elena Díez Jorge (Univ. de Granada), Ana Aranda Bernal (Univ. Pablo Olavide, Sevilla), María Núñez – González (Univ. de Sevilla)

18:00  Debate

VIERNES, 22 DE FEBRERO

MESA IV. EL ARTE EN SUS MANOS.  LOS MUSEOS Y LA GESTIÓN DEL PATRIMONIO
MODERA JONATAN JAIR LÓPEZ MUÑOZ (UCM)

10:00 Las mujeres y la arqueología en Europa: de la aristocracia a las clases medias. Margarita Díaz-Andreu (ICREA y Univ. de Barcelona)

10:30 Mujeres y museos en Europa  del Este. Laura Coltofean-Arizancu (Univ. de Barcelona)

11:00 Las profesionales de museos en España, una historia envuelta en silencios. Margarita Moreno Conde (Museo Arqueológico Nacional)

11:30 Debate. Pausa café

WORKSHOP
INVESTIGACIONES PREDOCTORALES
Presentación a cargo de María Ángeles Toajas Roger (UCM)

12:00 Aproximación al estudio de las mujeres en los talleres artísticos de la Villa de Madrid (1561–1700). Alba Gómez de Zamora Sanz  (UCM)

12:20 La decoración del Cuarto de la Reina en el Alcázar Real de Madrid bajo Isabel de Borbón- Introducción y reflexiones. Audrey-Caroline Michielon (UCM / Univ. de Toulouse –  Jean Jaurès )

12:40 El estudio de la moda femenina en la corte: Cuestiones metodológicas. María Redondo Solance  (UCM)

13:00 Las mujeres y las artes en “la hora navarra del XVIII”. Sergio Rodero Jiménez (UCM)

13:20 Mujeres en las actas de la Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando. Daniel Lavín González (UCM)

13:40 Debate y conclusiones del Segundo Seminario. Comida

VISITA GUIADA: REAL MONASTERIO DE LA ENCARNACIÓN
16:30 Encuentro frente al Monasterio. Plaza de la Encarnación, 1 (28013 Madrid)

Practical information 

Location: Salón de Grados y Sala de Juntas, Facultad de Geografía e Historia, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, February 20–22, 2019

Registration deadline: Feb 20, 2019

Scientific committee:
Antonio Bonet Correa, Rosario Camacho, Benito Navarrete, Mª Ángeles Pérez Samper, Javier Rivera Blanco.

Organisers:
Gloria Del Val, Sara Fuentes, Daniel Lavín, Jonatan Jair López, Sergio Ramiro, Sergio Rodero.

Supported by the Proyecto de Investigación I+D+i FEMENINO SINGULAR. Las mujeres y las artes en la Corte española de la Edad Moderna (reinas, nobles, artistas y empresarias) [HAR2015-65166-P MINECO/FEDER]

Email the organisers: lasmujeresylasartes@gmail.com

Website: https://www.ucm.es/femenino_singular/

Featured exhibition: ‘La hija del Virrey. El mundo femenino novohispano en el siglo XVII’, Museo de América, Madrid, until 3 March

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Curated by Andrés Gutiérrez Usillos, this exhibition focuses on an anonymous portrait of c. 1670. The work represents Doña María Luisa de Toledo, daughter of the Marquis of Mancera, Viceroy of New Spain, accompanied by a tattooed Indigenous woman. The show explores the world of the women portrayed in the painting, for example by reconstructing Doña María Luisa de Toledo’s trousseau, composed mainly of American and Asian items acquired in Mexico. The presentation thus analyses the clashes and encounters among the different worlds which coexisted in Viceregal America from a rare female perspective.

 Click here for more information, and here for an exhibition brochure.

Workshop: Transatlantic Spain: the Afro-Hispanic Experience of Slavery and Freedom (15th–19th centuries), Birkbeck, University of London, 6 July 2018

https3a2f2fcdn-evbuc-com2fimages2f463781942f1063291068392f12foriginalThis international workshop aims to contribute to the visibilization of enslaved and free peoples of Afro-Hispanic descent, by exploring their representation in the visual and literary regimes of early modern Spain and the New World, and to generate critical insights into the articulation of slave subjectivities.

This gathering, supported by CILAVS, the Centre of Iberian and Latin American Visual Studies at Birkbeck, University of London is organised by the Transatlantic Afro-Hispanic Study Group, that emerged from the international conference Border Subjects/ Global Hispanisms (Birkbeck, November 2017). The latter was the outcome of the institutional collaboration between the Department of Cultures and Languages at Birkbeck and the Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures at the University of Pittsburgh. This collaboration has already produced our first publication entitled, Post/Colonialism and the Pursuit of Freedom in the Black Atlantic (Routledge, 2018, ed. J. Branche), the result of an international conference held at the University of Pittsburgh in 2015.

To attend the workshop, please register here.

PROGRAMME

14:30pm-16:00

Jerome Branche (University of Pittsburgh, USA), Love and Affec(ta)tion: Re/Viewing Francisco de Quevedo’s ‘Boda de negros

Francisco de Quevedo’s ‘Boda de negros,’ (in)famous for its conceptista artistry as much as for its anti-immigrant and anti-black virulence, acquires an important historico-existential dimension when considered in the broader context of (Hispano)-Christian religious symbology of the seventeenth century. My paper proposes that the poem’s central trope of marital consummation, the performance of coitus by the black groom, simultaneously speaks to and reveals important additional registers of both sexual and racial dominance. On the one hand, the aromantic and bloody implications of bridal penetration sans affection figure as an early discursive projection of black brutality in Hispanic and western artistic discourse, as also do the poem’s references to cannibalism. On the other, the image of the nail (es/clavo), which he punningly deploys to also identify Tomé, the groom, partakes of the symbology of humiliation, servitude, and death (by crucifixion), that characterize Catholic traditions of mysticism, saintliness and self-negation. My paper proposes that a reflection on the image of the S and the nail deployed here by the poet, ubiquitous in the popular and religious iconography of the time, beyond the symbolism of Christian devotion/abjection, also speaks volumes in relation to the enslaved, incoming Africans, and to the material and epistemic violence visited and potentially visited on their bodies under the aegis of conquest and enslavement.

Baltasar Fra-Molinero (Bates College, Maine, USA), Black Women and the Inquisition: Race, Gender, Healing, and Power

More than two hundred women of African descent were prosecuted by the Inquisition of the Canary Islands between 1505 and 1834. Most cases involved accusations of witchcraft, or its lesser charge, sorcery. The accusations involved healing practices that the religious authorities considered unorthodox. The accusers could be priests as well as lay people who, in some cases, were coerced to testify against these women on the basis of their social reputation as healers outside the legal and professional channels. These women competed against the male practitioners of faculty medicine as well as against curanderosand saludadores, men and women who were authorized to use a mixture of empirical healing knowledge with religious prayers to obtain cures or remedies to the health of individuals or entire groups. This presentation explores the tensions created when Black women in the Canary Islands practiced medicine and magic healing while negotiating their social exclusion due to their gender and race. The reputation some of these Black women gained broke boundaries of religious and social prohibition. The Inquisition moved against many of these Black women on charges both of heresy—use of religious objects and words without authorization—and professional impropriety—practicing medicine without proper faculty—a crime that clearly fell outside the jurisdiction of the Holy Office.

Helen Melling (Institute of Latin American Studies, University of London, U.K.), Contested Visions of Black Wet Nurses in 18th & 19th Century Lima

Portraits of infants alongside their black wet nurses and nannies were incorporated into the family albums of the wealthiest Peruvian and European immigrant families in Lima from the 1860s, coinciding with the immediate post-abolition period in Peru. Although the creole elite’s preference in employing wet nurses of African-descent is examined and contested in late 18th century discourses, their presence in Peruvian visual culture does not arise until the advent of photography, producing the first images to make visible a practice that dates from Peru’s colonial and slaveholding past. The duplicity of these portraits resides in the dissonance between the marginal or supposedly ‘invisible’ presence of the wet nurse, and their centrality in the formation of an elite identity. This tension ruptures the fantasy of masterly ownership and creole ‘whiteness’, with the wet nurse constituting a deeply ambivalent symbol of the socio-racial pedigree of the elite.

16:15-16:30 Break

16.30-18.15

Carmen Fracchia (Birkbeck, University of London, U.K.), The Colour of Freedom in Hapsburg Spain (16th-17th Centuries)

This paper addresses the ways in which visual artists articulate and problematize the hegemonic associations of the appearance of (a) blackness as the social condition of slavery and the appearance of (b) whiteness as the social condition of freedom in the visual form. It will also focus on the hegemonic idea of ‘whiteness’ as the exclusive referent of the concept of humanity and on ‘blackness’ as the referent of Afro-Hispanic counter-culture as articulated in anonymous poems written individually and collectively by enslaved and liberated Afro-Hispanic people in the Spanish black confraternities.

José Miguel López García (University Autónoma of Madrid, Spain), In Pursuit of Freedom: Emancipated, Coartados, and Marrooned in Madrid (1701-1820)

During the Bourbon Dynasty, slaves in Madrid could obtain their freedom through letters of emancipation, deeds of ransom (coartación), or by running away. This paper, based on the analysis of 344 documents from the beginning of the eighteenth century to the early 19th century, considers the different degrees and routes to freedom that slaves could aspire to in a European capital city.

Luis Méndez Rodriguez (University of Seville, Spain), Narratives and Fictions Around Slavery: Towards A New Artistic Imaginary

This work analyzes the elements which defined artistic narratives and which allowed the spread of a visual culture of transatlantic slavery through the Hispanic world from the beginning of the seventeenth century. The Baroque created a set of archetypal images of Afro-Hispanic people, based eitheron their integration into, or their social exclusion from Hispanic societies. In this way, many groups congregated into ethnicbrotherhoods where they found a space to protect themselves from external threats, based on solidarity which allowed their visible participation in the public space. This paper also analyzes a set of images which formed an iconography of slavery. In the artistic context, some slaves not only achieved their freedom but also developed a profession and a certain social recognition. Their presence is studied in the development of a first artistic historiography based on documentary evidence, which also reveals how a fictional discourse of Afro-Hispanic lives was generated in the centuries that followed.

Featured Exhibition: Descubriendo a Luis Masson, Museo Lázaro Galdiano, Madrid, until 26 August

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As part of the 20thanniversary edition of the mass photography display of contemporary and historic works, PHotoESPAÑA (6 June-26 August 2018, venues across Madrid, Barcelona and in Valencia), the Museo Lázaro Galdiano in Madrid will open an exhibition Descubriendo a Luis Masson commemorating the work of the French 19th-century photographer Luis Masson (born 1825), who produced a complete topographical photographic study of Spain and was also noted for his photographic reproductions of the works of Murillo. Masson established himself in Seville in 1858 with his wife, Lorenza Simonin, with whom he worked over the next eight years producing a wide range of architectural photographs, some stereoscopic, of Seville and other Andalucian cities and monuments, working in particular for the Duque de Montpensier. In 1866 he moved to Madrid, recording from there the cities of Toledo, Ávila, Valladolid, Salamanca and Burgos, before returning to Seville at the end of the 1870s, where he was last recorded in 1881.The photographs are selected from the private Colección Fernández Rivero de Fotografía Antigua, which owns about 35,000 original photographs ranging from the 1840s through to the early decades of the 20thcentury. It focuses its collections on Spanish images and in particular photographs created in Andalucia, with a special section on Málaga and its province.  The exhibition was previously shown (January-March 2018) at the Centro Andaluz de la Fotografía, Almería. An accompanying monograph by Juan Antonio Fernández Rivero and María Teresa García Ballesteros, Descubriendo a Luis Masson, fotógrafo en la España del XIX which inventories 511 of Masson’s photographs was published by  Ediciones del Genal, Málaga in 2017.