Tag Archives: Madrid

Featured Exhibition: The challenge of white. Goya and Esteve, portraitists to the House of Osuna

d546d401-9747-4467-b080-19800ce5bc4d

Francisco de Goya, The Duke and Duchess of Osuna and their Children, 1787 – 1788. Oil on unlined canvas, 225 x 174 cm.

El desafío del blanco. Goya and Esteve, retratistas de la Casa de Osuna/portraitists to the House of Osuna, Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid. Closes 1 October 2017

This displays presents for the first time in the Prado the portrait of Manuela Isidra Téllez-Girón, the future Duchess of Abrantes, which was painted in 1797 by Agustín Esteve y Marqués, and which was recently acquired with the help of funds from the donation by Óscar Alzaga Villaamil. The child’s portrait is considered one of the finest works by the Valencian-born Esteve, the most important court portraitist after Goya. The exhibition brings together for the first time all the portraits painted by Agustín Esteve of the children of the Duke and Duchess of Osuna, on loan from private collections such as the Fundación Casa Ducal de Medinaceli, the Colección Duque del Infantado, Colección Masaveu and Colección Martínez Lanzas-de las Heras. In addition the display is accompanied by portraits of the 9th Duke Osuna, Pedro de Alcántara Téllez-Girón (1755-1807) and his wife and cousin, María Josefa de la Soledad Alonso-Pimentel (1752-1834), and their five children by other court artists including Goya’s family portrait of 1787-88 and a miniature by Guillermo Ducker (fl. 1795-1830) of Joaquina Téllez-Girón, Marchioness of Santa Cruz. The exhibition’s title refers to Esteve’s and Goya’s ability to meet the challenge of representing the transparent and pristine white materials worn by their sitters.

This is the final purchase with the Alzaga funds and in October 2017 the Prado will display the other six paintings in the Alzaga donation, which range from the sixteenth-century to the middle of the nineteenth-century and include works by Sánchez Cotán, Herrera “el Viejo,” Antonio del Castillo, and Eugenio Lucas Velázquez. The display will be accompanied by a catalogue of the donation.

Exhibition: Picasso and the Mediterranean, @ Fundación Canal, Madrid

_CACHE_20-FPCN-1858-PAN-R-BAJA_415x0Picasso and the Mediterranean
Fundación Canal, Calle Mateo Inurria, Madrid
1 June – 15 August 2017

Free exhibition of 91 works, mainly ceramics and prints, selected from the Picasso Museo Casa Natal in Málaga. About half the exhibition is devoted to the inspiration Picasso drew from bull-fighting and its rituals and includes his series of Toro lithographs from 1945-1946, which encompass naturalistic, cubist and surreal representations of the animal. Two other sections focus on the influence of Greco-Roman antiquity on Picasso’s nudes and mythological figures and the final section includes works showing the influence of ancient cultures including that of the Arab world.

For more information, click here: Picasso and the Mediterranean

Image: © Sucesión Pablo Picasso, VEGAP, Madrid, 2017. Source: Fundación Canal

Velázquez Portrait of Philip III (Prado)

Velázquez: Portrait of Philip III

Museo Nacional del Prado, Room 24
Villanueva Building, Room 24

6 June – 29 October 2017

On display for the first time in the Museum’s galleries is the Portrait of Philip III by Velázquez, a work donated by William B. Jordan to the American Friends of the Prado Museum, which has ceded it to the Museum as a long-term deposit.

Velázquez’s painting is displayed alongside the Prado’s Philip II offering the Infante don Fernando to Victory by Titian, which has very recently been restored (with the support of Fundación Iberdrola España). In the 17th century Titian’s painting hung in the same room (the Salón Nuevo in the Alcázar in Madrid) as The Expulsion of the Moriscos by Velázquez, a painting directly connected with the newly acquired portrait of Philip III, which was executed as a study for it.

This donation and long-term deposit with the Prado will assist in completing the Museum’s presentation of Velázquez as a court portraitist. A work previously unknown to scholars, it casts new light on one of the key paintings produced by the artist during his early years at court: The Expulsion of the Moriscos.

Also on temporary display are Philip III by Pedro Vidal; and Philip IV in Armour and The Infante don Carlos, both by Velázquez, thus creating a context for understanding the Philip III portrait and the reasons for its attribution to Velázquez (stylistic analysis, technical characteristics, and its relationship to The Expulsion of the Moriscos).

The Portrait of Philip III is a previously unpublished work with stylistic features and technical characteristics that allow it to be attributed to Velázquez and to be associated with The Expulsion of the Moriscos, a work painted in 1627 in competition with Vicente Carducho, Eugenio Cajés and Angelo Nardi. It was lost in the Royal Alcázar (Madrid) fire of 1734, but descriptions of it survive confirming that the principal figure depicted in it was Philip III, shown standing next to an allegory of Spain and pointing towards the Moriscos as they were being expelled. Velázquez never met Philip III, who died in 1621, and he based his work on portraits of the monarch by other artists. This canvas is a preliminary study that he used to establish an image of the King, thus explaining its sketchy nature as a working tool rather than an independent, finished work.

The recent restoration of Titian’s Philip II offering the Infante don Ferdinand to Victory, has recovered the qualities of Titian’s original, but has also made Carducho’s enlargements more visible. This is particularly evident in the architectural elements; and in the inferior quality blue pigments that Carducho used, resulting in a different aging process and making his modifications visible. Following the current display, the canvas will be shown with Carducho’s additions concealed.

El legado de al-Ándalus: Las antigüedades árabes en los dibujos de la Academia (Madrid)

2015-08-Legado-RealAcademia

Exhibition
El legado de al-Ándalus: Las antigüedades árabes en los dibujos de la Academia
Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando
Madrid
22 September – 8 December 2015

Includes 175 works, the majority drawings along with six paintings and various prints from the Academy’s collections which illustrate Moorish antiquities from Andalucia.

Online catalogue, by Antonio Almagro and others.

 

Exhibition: Francisco de Zurbarán, Madrid

2015-06-zurbaran_cabecerahomeZurbarán: A New Perspective; Zurbarán: una nueva mirada

Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid
9 June – 13 September 2015

The exhibition will include the recently conserved St Serapion — click here for video  (before its redisplay in the new European galleries at Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford, Connecticut), and aims to provide a new insight into the artist’s work by showing, for the first time in Spain, recently rediscovered works alongside paintings by the best of his pupils including his son Juan de Zurbarán’s still lives. Curated by Zurbarán specialist Odile Delenda and Mar Borobia, Head of Old Master Paintings at the Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza.

 

 

New book on the Spanish Royal Wallpaper Factory

The Spanish Royal Wallpaper Factory was the last 18th century royal factory to be created (under Carlos III), yet was almost entirely forgotten. Read all about it in this new publication:

2015-05-RealFabricaPapeles

Isadora Rose-de Viejo, La Real Fábrica de Papeles Pintados de Madrid (1786-1836): Arte, artesanía, industria. Madrid (Ediciones Cátedra-Grandes Temas núm. 64), 2015, 258 págs., 90 figs. ISBN: 978-84-376-3414-2 (20 €uros).

 

Exhibition & Symposium: Rogier van der Weyden: Museo del Prado, Madrid

2015-03-VanDerWeyden
Exhibition:
Rogier van der Weyden (c.1399-1464) , Prado Museum, 24 March – 28 June 2015.
Exhibition devoted particularly to the important influence of the fifteenth-century Flemish artist’s work in Spain and inspired by the recent completion of the conservation of his Escorial Crucifixion, which has been at the royal monastic palace since 1574. The exhibition, curated by Lorne Campbell (formerly of the National Gallery, London), will bring together for the first time Van der Weyden’s Crucifixion with other masterpieces with a Spanish provenance including the Prado’s Descent from the Cross and The Miraflores Triptych, now in Berlin as well as his Antwerp Seven Sacraments Triptych and some 15 other works including large paintings, sculptures and tapestries.

A symposium, ‘Rogier van der Weyden and the Iberian Peninsula‘, will be held on 5-6 May and address issues such as the significance of the Escorial Crucifixion and the relationships between Rogier’s paintings and sculpture produced in the Low Countries and in Castile, the career of the Brussels sculptor Egas Cueman, who settled in Castile, and the impact of Rogier’s work on the artists of the Iberian kingdoms.
Registration fee: General 120€; Students 60€; Scholars professionals 75€.