Tag Archives: Madrid

Closing Soon: Lightness and Boldness. Goya’s Drawings

 

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Francisco de Goya, I am still learning. Album G, 54
Ca. 1826. Black chalk, Lithographic crayon on grey laid paper, 192 x 145 mm.

Ligereza y atrevimiento. Dibujos de Goya, Centro Botín, Santander. Closes 24 September 2017.
One of the first exhibition’s in the  recently opened Renzo Piano designed Centro Botín, this show is curated by the Prado’s Head of Drawings and Prints, José Manuel Matilla, and the Chief Curator of the Goya and 18th-century Art Department, Manuela Mena. The exhibition includes 80 drawings, from the Prado’s holdings of some 520, selected as representative of the different periods of Goya’s artistic activity from 1796 to his death in 1828. Also shown are preparatory drawings for a selection of prints from his series, Sueños, Caprichos, Desastres de la guerra, Tauromaquia and Disparates. This exhibition is the result of an ambitious research and cataloguing project based on the drawings of Francisco de Goya, thanks to the collaboration agreement entered into by the Fundación Botín and  Prado Museum in 2014. The first volume of the catalogue raisonné is due to appear later in 2017 and a larger exhibition is provisionally scheduled at the Prado in 2019.

 

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Featured Exhibition: Portraits

retratosRetratos. Colecciones Fundación MAPFRE de fotografía, Sala Fundación MAPFRE Recoletos (Paseo de Recoletos 23, 28004 Madrid)

The exhibition ‘Retratos’ is on at the MAPFRE Foundation until 3 September 2017. Focusing on portraits in the twentieth century, the exhibition features photographs by Spanish and Latin American photographers such as Alberto García-Alix, Cristina García Rodero, Graciela Iturbide, Anna Malagrida, Fernando Maquieira. It is divided in four themes, ‘Cities,’ ‘Communities’ and ‘Artists and Models’ which attempt to embrace and reveal the complexity of contemporary portraiture.

Featured Exhibition: Lightness and Boldness. Goya’s Drawings

 

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Francisco de Goya, I am still learning. Album G, 54
Ca. 1826. Black chalk, Lithographic crayon on grey laid paper, 192 x 145 mm.

Ligereza y atrevimiento. Dibujos de Goya, Centro Botín, Santander. Closes 24 September 2017.
One of the first exhibitions in the  recently opened Renzo Piano designed Centro Botín, this show is curated by the Prado’s Head of Drawings and Prints, José Manuel Matilla, and the Chief Curator of the Goya and 18th-century Art Department, Manuela Mena. The exhibition includes 80 drawings, from the Prado’s holdings of some 520, selected as representative of the different periods of Goya’s artistic activity from 1796 to his death in 1828. Also shown are preparatory drawings for a selection of prints from his series, Sueños, Caprichos, Desastres de la guerra, Tauromaquia and Disparates. This exhibition is the result of an ambitious research and cataloguing project based on the drawings of Francisco de Goya, thanks to the collaboration agreement entered into by the Fundación Botín and  Prado Museum in 2014. The first volume of the catalogue raisonné is due to appear later in 2017 and a larger exhibition is provisionally scheduled at the Prado in 2019.

 

Featured Exhibition: The challenge of white. Goya and Esteve, portraitists to the House of Osuna

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Francisco de Goya, The Duke and Duchess of Osuna and their Children, 1787 – 1788. Oil on unlined canvas, 225 x 174 cm.

El desafío del blanco. Goya and Esteve, retratistas de la Casa de Osuna/portraitists to the House of Osuna, Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid. Closes 1 October 2017

This displays presents for the first time in the Prado the portrait of Manuela Isidra Téllez-Girón, the future Duchess of Abrantes, which was painted in 1797 by Agustín Esteve y Marqués, and which was recently acquired with the help of funds from the donation by Óscar Alzaga Villaamil. The child’s portrait is considered one of the finest works by the Valencian-born Esteve, the most important court portraitist after Goya. The exhibition brings together for the first time all the portraits painted by Agustín Esteve of the children of the Duke and Duchess of Osuna, on loan from private collections such as the Fundación Casa Ducal de Medinaceli, the Colección Duque del Infantado, Colección Masaveu and Colección Martínez Lanzas-de las Heras. In addition the display is accompanied by portraits of the 9th Duke Osuna, Pedro de Alcántara Téllez-Girón (1755-1807) and his wife and cousin, María Josefa de la Soledad Alonso-Pimentel (1752-1834), and their five children by other court artists including Goya’s family portrait of 1787-88 and a miniature by Guillermo Ducker (fl. 1795-1830) of Joaquina Téllez-Girón, Marchioness of Santa Cruz. The exhibition’s title refers to Esteve’s and Goya’s ability to meet the challenge of representing the transparent and pristine white materials worn by their sitters.

This is the final purchase with the Alzaga funds and in October 2017 the Prado will display the other six paintings in the Alzaga donation, which range from the sixteenth-century to the middle of the nineteenth-century and include works by Sánchez Cotán, Herrera “el Viejo,” Antonio del Castillo, and Eugenio Lucas Velázquez. The display will be accompanied by a catalogue of the donation.

Exhibition: Picasso and the Mediterranean, @ Fundación Canal, Madrid

_CACHE_20-FPCN-1858-PAN-R-BAJA_415x0Picasso and the Mediterranean
Fundación Canal, Calle Mateo Inurria, Madrid
1 June – 15 August 2017

Free exhibition of 91 works, mainly ceramics and prints, selected from the Picasso Museo Casa Natal in Málaga. About half the exhibition is devoted to the inspiration Picasso drew from bull-fighting and its rituals and includes his series of Toro lithographs from 1945-1946, which encompass naturalistic, cubist and surreal representations of the animal. Two other sections focus on the influence of Greco-Roman antiquity on Picasso’s nudes and mythological figures and the final section includes works showing the influence of ancient cultures including that of the Arab world.

For more information, click here: Picasso and the Mediterranean

Image: © Sucesión Pablo Picasso, VEGAP, Madrid, 2017. Source: Fundación Canal

Velázquez Portrait of Philip III (Prado)

Velázquez: Portrait of Philip III

Museo Nacional del Prado, Room 24
Villanueva Building, Room 24

6 June – 29 October 2017

On display for the first time in the Museum’s galleries is the Portrait of Philip III by Velázquez, a work donated by William B. Jordan to the American Friends of the Prado Museum, which has ceded it to the Museum as a long-term deposit.

Velázquez’s painting is displayed alongside the Prado’s Philip II offering the Infante don Fernando to Victory by Titian, which has very recently been restored (with the support of Fundación Iberdrola España). In the 17th century Titian’s painting hung in the same room (the Salón Nuevo in the Alcázar in Madrid) as The Expulsion of the Moriscos by Velázquez, a painting directly connected with the newly acquired portrait of Philip III, which was executed as a study for it.

This donation and long-term deposit with the Prado will assist in completing the Museum’s presentation of Velázquez as a court portraitist. A work previously unknown to scholars, it casts new light on one of the key paintings produced by the artist during his early years at court: The Expulsion of the Moriscos.

Also on temporary display are Philip III by Pedro Vidal; and Philip IV in Armour and The Infante don Carlos, both by Velázquez, thus creating a context for understanding the Philip III portrait and the reasons for its attribution to Velázquez (stylistic analysis, technical characteristics, and its relationship to The Expulsion of the Moriscos).

The Portrait of Philip III is a previously unpublished work with stylistic features and technical characteristics that allow it to be attributed to Velázquez and to be associated with The Expulsion of the Moriscos, a work painted in 1627 in competition with Vicente Carducho, Eugenio Cajés and Angelo Nardi. It was lost in the Royal Alcázar (Madrid) fire of 1734, but descriptions of it survive confirming that the principal figure depicted in it was Philip III, shown standing next to an allegory of Spain and pointing towards the Moriscos as they were being expelled. Velázquez never met Philip III, who died in 1621, and he based his work on portraits of the monarch by other artists. This canvas is a preliminary study that he used to establish an image of the King, thus explaining its sketchy nature as a working tool rather than an independent, finished work.

The recent restoration of Titian’s Philip II offering the Infante don Ferdinand to Victory, has recovered the qualities of Titian’s original, but has also made Carducho’s enlargements more visible. This is particularly evident in the architectural elements; and in the inferior quality blue pigments that Carducho used, resulting in a different aging process and making his modifications visible. Following the current display, the canvas will be shown with Carducho’s additions concealed.

Opening soon: Hispanic Society of America at the Prado

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Visions of the Hispanic World
Treasures from the Hispanic Society Museum and Library

Museo del Prado
Madrid, 4/4/2017 – 9/10/2017

The exhibition will present around 200 works from the holdings of the Hispanic Society of America in New York. Founded in 1904 by Archer Milton Huntington (1870-1955), a passionate collector and Hispanic art enthusiast, the Hispanic Society houses the most important collections of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American art to be found outside the Iberian Peninsula.

The selection of works in the exhibition includes some of the most celebrated objects from the Hispanic Society’s collections, including archaeological items, Islamic art and Spanish medieval art, works from the Spanish Golden Age, examples of Latin American colonial period and 19th-century art, and Spanish paintings from the 19th and 20th centuries.