Tag Archives: Museo del Prado

Applications deadline, 18 March 2016: EEHAR-CSIC / Museo Nacional del Prado

Abierta la convocatoria de ayudas EEHAR-CSIC / Museo Nacional del Prado

EEHAR-CSIC / Museo Nacional del Prado

Deadline: Friday, 18 March 2016!

La Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología en Roma-CSIC y el Museo Nacional del Prado comienzan una colaboración científica para promover iniciativas dirigidas a jóvenes investigadores en los campos de la Historia, la Historia del Arte y las Ciencias Humanas. La primera de ellas es la organización de un Taller dedicado a las Geografías de la pintura barroca, un encuentro entre especialistas de este campo y jóvenes investigadores que tendrá lugar en la Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología en Roma entre los días 10 y 12 de mayo de 2016.
For more information, click here.

Exhibition closing soon! The Divine Morales (Prado, Madrid; Bilbao; Barcelona)

2015-12-catalogo-el-divino-morales-castellano
El Divino Morales

Museo del Prado, Madrid

Exhibition closed 10 January 2016

Moves to:

Museo de Bellas Artes de Bilbao, 9 February – 16 May

Museu Nacional d’Art Catalunya, Barcelona, 16/06-16/09 2016.

Nineteen works owned by the Prado, including the Christ on the Cross and the Resurrection gifted by Plácido Arango, plus 35 from national and international museums, private collectors and religious institutions. Works include the Virgin with the Little Bird from the parish church of San Agustín in Madrid, the Virgin and Child with the Infant Saint John from the New Cathedral in Salamanca and the Ecce Homo from the Museu Nacional de Arte Antiga in Lisbon, which was recently restored in the Prado workshops.

Catalogue: 272 pages, 26,60 €

 

Scholarship report from Costanza Beltrami, winner of a 2014 Artes Coll & Cortes Travel Scholarship

Thanks to the ARTES-Coll & Cortés Travel Scholarship, I travelled to Spain in June to visit buildings designed by the fifteenth-century French master mason Juan Guas.

San Juan de los Reyes

San Juan de los Reyes

During a previous trip, I visited the monastery of San Juan de Los Reyes in Toledo. Designed by Guas, this monastery is a royal foundation established to celebrate the Battle of Toro (1476). Although this battle was fought between the Catholic Monarchs and Alfonso V of Portugal, the exterior of the monastery’s church is festooned with the chains of Christian prisoners freed after the conquest of Grenada [right]. Celebration of a victory against a Christian king and anti-Moorish propaganda thus intersect in the church.

This intersection generates questions: was there always an intention to associate the church with the reconquista and the unification of Spain? Is this association consciously reflected in the style of the building, a flamboyant Gothic design that incorporates Moorish elements such as epigraphic inscriptions and artesonado ceilings?

Other questions regard Guas’ role in this stylistic fusion. The mid-twentieth century historians José Maria de Azcárate and Fernando Chueca Goitia considered Guas the creator of a national style that fused flamboyant Gothic with Spain’s unique Mudéjar heritage. Since Guas was the Catholic Monarchs’ royal architect, elements of royal propaganda in his designs are not surprising. But does this extend to the creation of a ‘national style’? With this question in mind, I designed the trip kindly sponsored by the ARTES-Coll and Cortés Travel Scholarship.

My travel started at the Prado Museum. Here I observed Flemish and ‘Hispano-Flemish’ works to consider how Flemish style and techniques were received in another medium.

Palacio del Infantado

Palacio del Infantado

I then started visiting Guas’ buildings, first the Castle of Manzanares el Real and then the Palacio del Infantado in Guadalajara. Together with San Juan de los Reyes, these are usually pinpointed as Guas’ ‘Hispano-islamic’ works. Indeed, I noticed features possibly inspired by Mudéjar sources, for example blind ‘horseshoe arches’ at the top of the Infantado’s gallery [left], and long epigraphic inscriptions.

 

Yet Mudéjar details are not the only decoration; moreover, Manzanares and the Infantado were built for the Mendoza family, not for the kings. Rather than celebrate the new national unity, Mudéjar designs may simply contribute to express noble magnificentia.

The desire to express magnificentia offers a specific motivation for Guas’ fusion of Gothic and Mudéjar in these palaces. Contrary to what some scholars have implied, Guas did not simply ‘absorb’ Toledo’s Mudéjar buildings and unconsciously reproduce their features.

My next destinations were Segovia and Avila. Segovia cathedral is attributed to Juan Gil de Hontañón, trained in Guas’ workshop. The detailing of the bases of the cathedral’s nave piers is almost identical to that of Manzanares’ courtyard, suggesting broader stylistic uniformity than it appears when focusing on a single architect.

Visiting the monastery of El Parral in Segovia and that of Santo Tomás in Avila evidenced similarities between buildings sponsored by royal patronage: for example, both monasteries’ churches have choirs elevated over slender segmental arches.

My next stop, El Paular monastery, contains an alabaster altarpiece where flamboyant Gothic elements are used in a typically Spanish floor-to-ceiling retablo. Unsurprisingly, it is attributed to sculptors close to Guas, who designed the monastery’s cloister. This has different vault designs on each side, possibly depending on its position relative to El Paular’s church.

San Gregorio

San Gregorio

I then visited Valladolid’s Colegio de San Gregorio [right]. Covered with figural decoration and branch tracery, San Gregorio’s façade contradicts the characterization of Guas’ decoration as geometric, aniconic and therefore ‘oriental.’

For all its display of heraldic devices, the building hardly fits the ideological framework built around Guas’ style by Azcárate and Goitia. Indeed, San Gregorio’s decorative complexity underscored my overall impression of Guas’ style as resistant to nationalistic labels.

 

 

I am very grateful to ARTES and Coll & Cortés for this invaluable opportunity to analyse the stylistic labels attached to Guas through first-hand encounter with his oeuvre.

Exhibition & Symposium: Rogier van der Weyden: Museo del Prado, Madrid

2015-03-VanDerWeyden
Exhibition:
Rogier van der Weyden (c.1399-1464) , Prado Museum, 24 March – 28 June 2015.
Exhibition devoted particularly to the important influence of the fifteenth-century Flemish artist’s work in Spain and inspired by the recent completion of the conservation of his Escorial Crucifixion, which has been at the royal monastic palace since 1574. The exhibition, curated by Lorne Campbell (formerly of the National Gallery, London), will bring together for the first time Van der Weyden’s Crucifixion with other masterpieces with a Spanish provenance including the Prado’s Descent from the Cross and The Miraflores Triptych, now in Berlin as well as his Antwerp Seven Sacraments Triptych and some 15 other works including large paintings, sculptures and tapestries.

A symposium, ‘Rogier van der Weyden and the Iberian Peninsula‘, will be held on 5-6 May and address issues such as the significance of the Escorial Crucifixion and the relationships between Rogier’s paintings and sculpture produced in the Low Countries and in Castile, the career of the Brussels sculptor Egas Cueman, who settled in Castile, and the impact of Rogier’s work on the artists of the Iberian kingdoms.
Registration fee: General 120€; Students 60€; Scholars professionals 75€.

2015-02-Goya-TapestryCartoons
Goya in Madrid. The Tapestry Cartoons 1775-1794
Prado Museum, Madrid
28 November 2014 – 3 May 2015

Curators: Manuela Mena, Head Curator of the Goya and 18th Century Art Department, and Gudrun Maurer, Curator of the Goya and 18th Century Painting Department at the Museo del Prado

The exhibition of over 140 works proposes a new approach to Goya’s tapestry cartoons by treating them as illustrating the artist’s thought processes and development at the beginning of his career. Cartoons are shown alongside the tapestries for which they were made in the Escorial and Pardo palaces. They are compared  with the work of contemporaneous and historic artists to illustrate Goya’s sources and inspiration.

Juan Facundo Riaño Essay Prize: 2015 winners announced

Catherine of AustriaArtes is delighted to announce the winners of the 2015 Juan Facundo Riaño Essay Prize. First prize is awarded to Rebekah Lee, a PhD student at the University of York, for her essay ‘Catherine of Austria, Queen of Portugal and the Courtly Portrayal of Middle Age’. The runner up prize goes to Iñigo Basarrate González de Audikana, a PhD student at the University of Edinburgh. His essay is entitled ‘The Discovery of Spanish Christian Architecture’. Artes offers its congratulations to the authors for two excellent essays. The prizes were awarded at a special awards ceremony at the Spanish Embassy in London on Thursday 26th March.

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The winners with Mr Fidel López Álvarez, Minister Counsellor for Cultural and Scientific Affairs, and Dr Tom Nickson, Chair of Artes. Photo: http://www.photolorenzohernandez.com

Exhibition: Dibujos españoles en la Hamburger Kunsthalle, Prado, Madrid

2014-11-DibujosEsp-HambKunsthalle2014-11-SpanishDwgsHamb-KunsthalleSpanish Drawings from the Hamburger Kunsthalle: Cano, Murillo and Goya, Museo del Prado, 30 October 2014 – 8 February 2015.
Previously on display as The Grand Gesture: Drawings from Murillo to Goya from the Hamburger Kunsthalle, at the Meadows Museum, Dallas, this exhibition has moved to the  Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid.
A significant percentage of the collection, acquired for the Kunsthalle’s Kupferstichkabinett  (Department of Prints, Drawings and Photography) by its first Director, Alfred Lichtwark (1852-1914), is on view.
The exhibition is accompanied by a complete catalogue of all the drawings in the collection, written by Jens Hoffman-Samland with the collaboration of María Cruz de Carlos Varona, Gabriele Fialdi, José Manuel Matilla, Manuela Mena and Gloria Solache, curators at the Museo del Prado.
The exhibition has been co-organized by the Meadows Museum, SMU; the Museo Nacional del Prado; the Hamburger Kunsthalle; the Centro de Estudios Europa Hispánica; and the Center for Spain in America.