Tag Archives: Portugal

Edilia and François-Auguste de Montêquin Fellowship, Society of Architectural Historians, deadline 30 September, 2018

 

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Cathedral of Santa María la Menor, Santo Domingo

This award provides support for travel related to research on Spanish, Portuguese, or Ibero-American architecture.

The awards consist of a $2,000 stipend for a junior scholar and a $6,000 award for a senior scholar. The awardees will be notified in December and will be recognized at the SAH 72nd Annual International Conference in Providence, Rhode Island (April 24–28, 2019). The awards will be announced in the May 2019 issue of the SAH Newsletter.

This fellowship is intended to support the research of junior scholars (usually scholars engaged in doctoral dissertation research) annually, and senior scholars (scholars who have completed their PhD or equivalent terminal degree) every other year in even-numbered years (2020, 2022, 2024, etc.). The research to be supported must focus on Spanish, Portuguese, or Ibero-American architecture, including colonial architecture produced by the Spaniards in the Philippines and what is today the United States. The applicant must be a current member of SAH.

Following completion of travel and research supported by the fellowship, each de Montêquin Fellowship awardee must submit a written report summarizing their research and explaining what travel was undertaken and how funds were spent. The report will be submitted to the SAH office no later than three months following the completion of work related to the fellowship. Awardees are required to upload images to SAHARA (a minimum of 50  for junior scholars and a minimum of 150 for senior scholars).

You will need two recommendations to apply for this fellowship, a description of the research project on Iberian or Ibero-American architecture to be funded (500 words maximum), a current curriculum vitae (5 pages max), and a statement of purpose.

Applications for the 2019 Edilia and François-Auguste de Montêquin Fellowship will open at 3 pm CDT on August 1, 2018, and close on September 30, 2018.

Click here for more information and to complete the application form.

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New Publication: Almudena Pérez de Tudela Gabaldón, ‘Los inventarios de Doña Juana de Austria, Princesa de Portugal (1535–1573)

9788491590941
Almudena Pérez de Tudela Gabaldón
Los inventarios de Doña Juana de Austria, Princesa de Portugal (1535–1573) 
2018
Universidad de Jaén
ISBN: 978-84-9159-094-1
35

 

La princesa Juana de Austria fue una de las coleccionistas y mecenas más importantes en la España de la segunda mitad del siglo XVI. Sin embargo, su figura ha quedado eclipsada por la de su hermano, el rey Felipe II. Al trasladarse la corte a Madrid ocupará unas habitaciones en el palacio al lado de las de las reinas e infantas, para las que constituirá un referente. Durante muchas celebraciones religiosas residiría en sus cuartos del monasterio de las Descalzas Reales, fundado por ella. Para su estudio resulta fundamental el inventario de bienes que se redacta cuando fallece en 1573 que se publica por primera vez de manera sistemática. También se contextualiza con otros destacados documentos como la herencia materna, su ajuar de 1553 o su almoneda parcial, entre otros. Este corpus documental constituye el punto de partida para reconstruir su prácticamente perdida colección.

Overshadowed by her brother, King Philip II, Princess Joanna of Austria was one of the most important private collector and patrons in Spain in the second half of the sixteenth century. When the court moved to Madrird, she occupied rooms in the palace alongside the Queen and the Infantas and came to be an important influence on them. She founded the convent of the Descalzas Reales and would stay there in her rooms for many of the feast days and festivals. This inventory, carried out when she died in 1573, is essential to the study of the convent of the Descalzas Reales and is published here systematically for the first time. In addition, it contextualises her inventory with other notable documents such as, for example, her inheritance from her mother, her dowry of 1553 or the partial auction of her estate. This body of documentary information is the starting point for reconstructing her almost completely lost collection.

 

 

 

ARTES Coll & Cortés Travel Scholarship report: Sylvia Alvares-Correa (PhD Candidate, University of Oxford)

By Sylvia Alvares-Correa

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Joos van Cleve (attr.)
The Annunciation
1512-1520
Oil on oak panel
Museu de Arte Sacra do Funchal, inv. MASF35

joosvancleve2

Detail of figure 1

The generous award funds provided by ARTES Coll&Cortes allowed me to travel to Lisbon to investigate the transmission of Flemish art, designs, and techniques to Portugal in the late medieval period, on which my PhD research is based. The trip fortuitously overlapped with the exhibition ‘The Islands of White Gold, Art Commissions in Madeira: 15th and 16th Centuries’ at the Museu Nacional De Arte Antiga as well as the ‘Medieval Europe in Motion—The Middle Ages, A Global Context?’ conference hosted at the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation. Both introduced me to works of art and research with which I had not been familiar and underlined the complexity and ambiguity involved in defining artistic transmission.

quentinmetsys

Workshop or Circle of Quentin Metsys
Triptych of the Descent from the Cross
Oil on oak panel
Museu Nacional de Arte Antiga, Inv. 1285 Pint

The fluid movement of artists and designs between north and south during this period means that just because something looks Flemish doesn’t necessarily mean it is; unfortunately, ‘style’ is often the determinant factor in classifying the origin of artworks in museums as well as in literature. Production methods can help elucidate if not by who at least where an artwork was made. To this end, the research trip sponsored by ARTES Coll & Cortes allowed me to collect data on the different joinery methods used in 15th and 16th century panel painting. Specifically, I sought out works joined by perpendicular dowels. Internal dowels, the predominate joinery method found in the north, in some cases dictated by guild regulations, are less likely to disrupt the surface of the painting; perpendicular dowels, however, tend to protrude slightly to the surface over time and can often be discerned with the naked eye. Current research proposes that the latter joinery method was predominant exclusively in Portugal (though famously employed by Hugo van der Goes as well).

 

quentynmetsys2

Detail of figure 2

My preliminary investigations, however, yielded evidence that perpendicular dowels were utilized not only Portuguese panel paintings, but also in panels believed to be imported from Flanders. While it is too early to draw conclusions, the diversity of joinery methods observed suggest that either perpendicular dowels were not as uncommon to northern production as has been supposed or that certain works in Portuguese collections which have been classified as ‘Flemish’ were perhaps produced locally. I’m looking forward to delving in further!

 

 

 

 

 

Call For Papers: Fashion, Costume, and Consumer Culture in Iberia and Latin America: A Session in Honor of Gridley McKim-Smith, CAA conference, 21-24 February 2018, Los Angeles

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María Cristina de Borbon, Queen of Spain, Vicente López Portaña ©Museo Nacional del Prado

For the next annual conference of the College Art Association (CAA), scheduled for 21-24 February 2018 in Los Angeles, the American Society for Hispanic Art Historical Studies is organizing a panel in memory of the Hispanist Gridley McKim-Smith (1943-2013).  The chairs, Mey-Yen Moriuchi and Mark Castro, invite paper proposals by August 14.

Fashion, Costume, and Consumer Culture in Iberia and Latin America: A Session in Honor of Gridley McKim-Smith
“Material splendor—rare and exquisite fabrics, dazzling displays of wealth and sartorial beauty—is a compelling value in Hispanic-American clothing” (McKim-Smith, Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque 2013, 111).  Gridley McKim-Smith (1943–2013) argued that the “profound materiality and sensuality of costume is crucial in Spain’s American possessions, where only stuffs recognized as prestigious can insulate the wearer from public disgrace and where the most sumptuous silks or alpacas, sometimes interwoven with precious metals, can make the wearer both admired and desired.” (114)  In honor of the late McKim-Smith’s research interests and scholarship this session will consider representations of dress and fashion in Iberia and Latin America.  In the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking worlds, depictions of costumes in paintings, sculptures, prints, and other visual media, as well as the creation of textiles and garments, demonstrate the power of dress in the construction of social, racial, gender, and cultural identities.  The existence of extensive global trade networks facilitated the exchange and synthesis of artistic practices and craftsmanship permitting unique garments and objects which revealed the wearer’s style, aesthetic preferences, and social status.  We seek papers from broad geographical and chronological periods, from Pre-Columbian to Modern, that consider the role of fashion, costume, and consumer culture in the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking worlds.  How do clothes mediate identity, ideology, social rank, and subjectivity?  What is the relationship between consumer culture and conspicuous consumption in Iberia and Latin America?  How did dimensions of lived experience—psychological, performative, and political—survive in articles of dress?
Chairs: Mey-Yen Moriuchi, La Salle University, moriuchi@lasalle.edu; Mark Castro, Philadelphia Museum of Art, mcastro@philamuseum.org
The deadline for submissions is Monday, August 14. Click here for CAA’s proposal guidelines, which indicate that speakers on the panel must be members of CAA.  Decisions on the proposals will be sent by Monday, August 28.  If you have questions, please reach out to the chairs.

VIA Arts Prize, 2017 Edition

image003VIA Arts Prize: deadline 16th October 2017
The Embassies of Latin American countries, Spain and Portugal, in collaboration with Itaú Unibanco and supported by People’s Palace Projects (Queen Mary University of London), are delighted to launch the 2017 edition of the VIA Arts Prize.
In an unparalleled exchange between the UK and Latin cultures, this dedicated visual arts competition invites all UK-based artists to enter into a creative dialogue with Ibero-American art and artists. Following the pre-selection process conducted by the curatorial committee, up to 30 artworks will then go on display for three weeks at the Embassy of Brazil. A special jury will judge the final selection.
Please find full information at the contest website. Submissions for the competition, which may include paintings, drawings, sculpture, photography and prints, are now invited from artists living and working in the UK. Participants must be aged 16 or over.
We encourage you to participate in this contest and there are several ways in which you can get involved:
·         Applying if you have an artistic vein;
·         Sharing this opportunity;
·         Attending the finalists’ exhibition in November to vote for your favourite.
The prizes are: 1st Prize £5,000 and a solo exhibition at the Embassy of Brazil; 2nd Prize £2,000.
The exhibition will be at the Embassy of Brazil in London from the 3rd – 23rd November 2017.
For further information please contact:
Andrzej Stuart-Thompson (English)
Ana Elizabeth González (Spanish)

Marcio Junji Sono (Portuguese)

 

CFP: Through, From, To Latin America: Networks, circulations and artistic transits from the 1960s to the present

1923933798International Conference: Through, From, To Latin America: Networks, circulations and artistic transits from the 1960s to the present, Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas da Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal, 27 and 28 November 2017
Deadline for paper proposals: 15 July

The project “Through, From, To Latin America: Networks, circulations
and artistic transits from the 1960s to the present” emerges from the
collaboration of three research groups engaged in the development of
transnational perspectives in contemporary art history and curating and
in the study of relations between artistic production and migratory
processes – with a particular focus on Latin America and Southern
Europe. More specifically, the organization of this project involves:
the group “Transnational Perspectives on Contemporary Art” associated
to the research line Contemporary Art Studies at IHA/FCSH-UNL, the
group “Art in a Global Perspective” at CIEBA / FBAUL and the research
project “Decentralized Modernities: art, politics and counterculture in
the transatlantic axis during the Cold War/ MoDe(s)” (HAR2014-53834-P),
at the University of Barcelona.

Through, From, To Latin America: Networks, circulations and artistic
transits from the 1960s to the present – inscribed in the program of
Lisbon 2017 Ibero-American Capital of Culture – aims at opening a
critical space of debate by engaging art historians, curators and
artists of different generations and nationalities to discuss the role
of different forms of dislocation – such as artistic migrations,
exiles, networking, circulations of ideas and theoretical
articulations, artworks and exhibitions – in the shaping of
contemporary art in and beyond Latin America. In this sense, the very
diverse and heterogeneous set of geographical and cultural areas
incorporated by the term “Latin America” are envisioned here as
specific and at the same time as territories strongly connected with
other locations through a complex network of itineraries, circulations,
appropriations and translations. In this network, different historical,
political and economic processes – among them, colonization and
decolonization – play significant roles. This project seeks to explore
the tensions and interrelations between local inscription and
connectivity, habitation and circulation, present enunciation and
revisiting the past.

Two different actions articulate the project Through, From, To Latin
America: Networks, circulations and artistic transits from the 1960s to
the present: an international conference and a set of workshops in the
field of curating, artistic practice and art history. In fact, it aims
to offer different possibilities and forms of engagement to the
participants.

Call for papers
The group “Transnational Perspectives on Contemporary Art”
(Contemporary Art Studies – IHA/FCSH-UNL), the group “Arte numa
perspectiva global/Art in a global perspective” (CIEBA/FBAUL) and the
project “Decentralized Modernities: art, politics and counterculture in
the transatlantic axis during the Cold War/ MoDe(s)” (HAR2014-53834-P)
(University of Barcelona), together with the Program of Lisbon 2017
Ibero-American Capital of Culture, welcome communication proposals from
art historians, curators, art critics and artists for the international
conference Through, From, To Latin America: Networks, circulations and
artistic transits from the 1960s to the present (Lisbon, Auditorium of
Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas da Universidade Nova de Lisboa,
27 and 28 November 2017).
Proposals for communications can address, but are not limited to, the
following topics:
– The role of different forms of dislocation in the shaping of
contemporary art in and beyond Latin America;
– Interrelations between local inscription and connectivity, habitation
and circulation, present enunciation and revisiting the past;
– Analysis of artistic and curatorial projects that relate to the
questions proposed;
– Exploration of South-South transits and circulations between Latin
America, Southern Europe, Africa and Asia;
– Interconnections between artistic networks and social and political
movements since the Cold War;
– Analysis of how artistic and cultural networks interfered with (or
participated in) the geopolitics of Cold War and globalization.

Submissions
This two-days conference invites proposals of up to 400 words for
communications of 20 minutes. Please also include a brief biographical
note (150 words), institutional affiliation (or independent) and your
contact information. All documents sent should be in word or pdf format.
We can only accept one proposal for each applicant.

Proposals should be emailed by the 15th of July 2017 to the following
e-mail address:
americalatinaconferencia2017@gmail.com
The languages of the conference are Spanish, Portuguese and English.

Applicants will be notified of the results of the selection by late
July / early August 2017.

An edited volume with selected papers presented at the conference will
be proposed for publication.

For more in formation please check the website:
http://americalatinaconferenciainternacional2017.weebly.com