Tag Archives: Liverpool

CFP: ‘Imperial Entanglements: Trans-Oceanic Basque Networks in British and Spanish Colonialism and their Legacy’, Museum of Liverpool, Liverpool UK, 9–10 August 2019

Port-cities in Britain are known and studied as crossroads and gateways of empire. People, ideas, goods, money, etc. flowed in and out of these porous urban environments. For many people, port-cities were not only a place of transience, they could also be a home city with a strong sense of community. From the 16th through the 19th centuries, some of those who called port-cities their homes were part of the Anglo-Spanish diaspora. From Cadiz to London or Bilbao to Liverpool, Spanish and British citizens crossed the oceans in order to participate in Anglo-Spanish trade and imperial expansion. These voyages inevitably led to the creation of Anglo-Spanish communities in the littoral regions of both empires. The growth and success of Anglo-Spanish communities in port-cities was driven in part by imperial ventures such as the textile industry, mining, and the slave trade. It is not always easy to reconcile the history of exploitative ventures with the immigrant communities whose creation they facilitated. However, it is important to bring together local and imperial histories in order to understand how Anglo-Spanish communities were built, thrived, and sometimes waned.

This conference seeks to bring together scholars interested in the lives of Anglo-Spanish communities across both the Spanish and British empires. The conference also seeks to address the tensions that investigating family and local history can bring to communities today. The conference will be open to the public in the hopes that those interested in the conference themes will come and engage with the ideas being presented. The themes of this conference were inspired by the histories of two Anglo-Basque families, the Zuluetas and the Larrinagas, both of whom have contentious legacies in London and Liverpool.

The organisers are particularly interested in paper or panel proposals in the areas of family history; literature; art history; business history; food history; urban history; slave-trade history; shipping history; and cultural history. Please click here for more information. Please send individual paper or panel proposals to Dr. Anna Brinkman (a.brinkman@warwick.ac.uk) by midnight on 25 March.

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The Mayas, Liverpool, June – October 2015

2015-06-mayas-head
Exhibition:
Mayas: Revelation of an Endless Time

World Museum, Liverpool
19 June – 18 October 2015

Large exhibition produced by the Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia (INAH) in Mexico City, exploring the Mayan civilization of eastern Mexico and modern day Guatemala, Belize, western Honduras and El Salvador. 385 objects, from museums and Mayan sites, ranging from striking funerary masks to intricate jade jewellery. It will be the only opportunity in the UK to see this exhibition, which has been organised as part of the 2015 ‘Year of Mexico in the United Kingdom’ and ‘Year of the United Kingdom in Mexico’. Entry free of charge.

2015-06-MXUK-logo

2015-06-Maya-catalogue-largeCatalogue:
Mercedes de la Garza ed., Mayas: Revelation of an Endless Time, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, 2015, 240 pp, 365 colour illus., £25. ISBN 9786074846515.
Extremely well illustrated, with colour photos, maps and an extensive comparative timeline from 3,000 BC to 1500 AD across civilizations in the Americas, Europe, Africa and Asia. Seven essays focusing mainly on the different regional characteristics of the Maya civilization in the Mexican Yucatan peninsula introduce brief catalogue entries on all 303 objects divided into eight thematic sections.

 

Leonora Carrington, Tate Liverpool, 6 March – 31 May 2015

2015-03-leonoracarringtonthepompExhibition:
Leonora Carrington, Tate Liverpool, 6 March – 31 May 2015.
Exhibition put on as part of the 2015 Year of Mexico in Britain celebrations. Tate Liverpool has organised the first monographic exhibition in the UK devoted solely to the Lancashire-born but Mexican-based surrealist Leonora Carrington (1917-2011). A selection of key paintings made throughout her career explore how she devised her own distinctive take on surrealism whilst working alongside other artists such as Salvador Dalí. Also displayed alongside her paintings are examples of her poetry, sculpture, textiles and tapestries as well as designs for film and theatrical performances that she created after she had settled in Mexico in 1941. The exhibition is not, however, accompanied by a catalogue though there is a planned Study Day scheduled for Saturday 23 May, 10.30-16.30.

Spanish Art Symposium – Auckland Castle, The Bowes Museum & Durham University – Thursday 23 October to Saturday 25 October 2014

A symposium on Spanish Art will take place from 23-25 October in Co Durham, highlighting collections in the area and launching a book on treasures of Spanish Art in Country Durham. The three-day event will include exclusive access to view Zurbarán’s Jacob and his Twelve Sons and a conference dinner at Auckland Castle.

Below is a provisional programme for the event (the pdf is available here: Spanish Art Symposium Programme – Co Durham – 23-25 Oct 2014

To book a place, or for further information, please contact:

Rosie Bradford
Groups and Events Co-ordinator
The Bowes Museum

symposium@thebowesmuseum.org.uk
01833 694615

Thursday 23 October 2014
Auckland Castle, Market Place, Bishop Auckland, County Durham, DL14 7NR

Auckland Castle

Friday 24 October 2014
The Bowes Museum, Barnard Castle, County Durham, DL12 8NP

Bowes Museum Barnard Castle County Durham

Saturday 25 October 2014
Palace Green, Durham University, Durham, County Durham, DH1 3RN

Palace Green University of Durham

Jointly organised by Auckland Castle, The Bowes Museum, and Durham University, this three-day symposium aims to highlight the outstanding collections of Spanish art held in County Durham. Internationally renowned academics and museum professionals will present a wide range of papers that will place these significant collections within their artistic, cultural, and historic context. The symposium will also be an opportunity to consider the reception of seventeenth-century Spanish art in Britain, marking the bicentenary of the arrival of Velázquez’s The Rokeby Venus in Teesdale (now in the National Gallery, London).

County Durham has historically been a hot spot for the collection and display of Spanish art, which fascinated influential figures such as Bishop Richard Trevor, John and Joséphine Bowes, and Frank Hall Standish. Today the results of this interest are to be found in the collections at The Bowes Museum and Auckland Castle, which together represent the most significant UK holdings of Spanish Golden Age art outside of London.

The symposium heralds a wider, long-term vision shared by Auckland Castle, The Bowes Museum, and Durham University, to establish County Durham as a centre for the study of Spanish art in the UK, and as a world-class visitor destination.

El Greco, 1580-1589, The Tears of St Peter, ooc, The Bowes Museum, Castle Barnard, Co Durham

El Greco (1541-1641), The Tears of St Peter, 1580-1589, oil on canvas, The Bowes Museum

PROGRAMME

23 October 2014
Auckland Castle

09.30 – 10.00   Registration
10.00 – 10.30
Welcome Remarks
Jonathan Ruffer, Chairman of the Auckland Castle Trust
10.30 – 11.30
Zurbarán and Britain (Title TBC)
Gabriele Finaldi, Associate Director of Curatorship and Research, the Museo del Prado, Madrid
11.30 – 12.00   Coffee Break
12.00 – 13.00
Francisco de Zurbarán’s representations of Saint Francis in the National Gallery
Letizia Treves, Curator of Italian and Spanish Paintings 1600-1800, The National Gallery, London
13.00 – 14.30   Lunch – Tours of proposed Spanish Art Gallery site in Bishop Auckland Market Place
14.30 – 15.30
The Sons of Jacob: the first dysfunctional family why did Zurbarán paint them?
Alastair Laing, former Curator of Pictures and Sculpture, The National Trust
Thomas Gainsborough’s response to the work of Spanish masters
Anthony Mould, Fine Art Agent and Dealer specialising in British Art
15.30 – 16.00   Refreshments
16.00 – 17.00
The Museo del Prado and the visual construction 
of the history of Spanish painting in the nineteenth century
Javier Portús, Senior Curator of Spanish Painting, Museo del Prado, Madrid
17.00 – 17.45     Concluding Remarks
18.00 – 19.00     Drinks Reception and Book Launch
19.00 – 22.00     Conference Dinner                            

Francisco de Zurbarán, Levi, oil on canvas, Auckland Castle

Francisco de Zurbarán (1598-1664), Levi, 1640-45, oil on canvas, Auckland Castle, Bishop Auckland, Co Durham

24 October 2014
The Bowes Museum

09.30 – 09.45
Welcome and Introduction
Adrian Jenkins, Director of The Bowes Museum
09.45 – 10.25
Art collecting as a language of friendship and affinity between England and Spain
during the seventeenth century
Toby Osborne, Senior Lecturer in History, Durham University
10.25 – 11.05
Spanish masters and the spoils of war: the circulation of Spanish art in the era of Napoleon
Tom Stammers, Lecturer in History, Durham University
11.05 – 11.30   Coffee Break
11.30 – 12.10    
Preliminary thoughts on materiality and spirituality in the works of Francisco de Zurbarán 

Cordula van Whye, Lecturer in History of Art, University of York
12.10 – 12.50
Madrid’s monastic, artistic, and cultural heritage before the Confiscation of 1835. Report by the Royal Academy of Fine Arts of San Fernando
Itziar Aranna, Research Fellow, Academia de San Fernando,
12.50 – 14.00   Lunch – optional tours of the Museum
14.00 – 14.30
Frank Hall Standish (1799-1840), Collector of Durham, Duxbury and Seville
Howard Coutts, Keeper of Ceramics, The Bowes Museum
14.30 – 15.00
Frank Hall Standish and his paintings acquisitions in Seville
Xanthe Brooke, Senior Curator (Continental European Fine Art), Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool
15.00 – 15.40
John Bowes and the sale of the Quinto Collection: an opportunity or a question of taste?
Véronique Gérard Powell, Senior Lecturer (Honorary) University of Paris-Sorbonne
15.40 – 16.15   Tea Break
16.15 – 16.45   Closing Remarks
17.00 – 18.00   Tours of Picture Gallery and Exhibition
18.00 – 22.00   Drinks Reception and Conference Dinner

(c) The Bowes Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

José Antolínez, The Immaculate Conception, oil on canvas, The Bowes Museum, Castle Barnard, Co Durham

25 October 2014
Durham University

09.30 ‒ 09.45   Arrival and Coffee
09.45 ‒ 10.15     
Sugar and spice and all things nice: José Antolínez and the Immaculate Virgin of the Bowes Museum

Lesley K. Twomey, Reader in Medieval and Golden Age Iberian Art, University of Northumbria
10.15 ‒ 10.45
Sacred skin: the martyrdom of St Bartholomew in Spanish Golden Age art
Andy Beresford, Professor of Spanish, Durham University
10.45 ‒ 11.10   Coffee Break
11.10 ‒ 11.40
The art of Seville and the collection of a scholar: Stirling Maxwell and the Fiestas de Sevilla
Hilary Macartney, Lecturer in Hispanic Art, University of Glasgow
11.40 ‒ 12.10
In the wake of Colonna and Mitelli: Quadratura in the Court of the Last Habsburg
Jeremy Robbins, Forbes Chair of Spanish, University of Edinburgh
12.10 ‒ 12.40
Spanish art and the Catholic Revival in Britain
Stefano Cracolici, Reader in Italian, Durham University
12.40 ‒ 13.30    Lunch
13.30 ‒ 14.30    Round Table Discussion
‘Engaging public interest in Spanish religious art’
14.45 ‒ 15.30    Optional Tour of Durham Castle Collection

(c) Durham University; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Unknown artist, St Jerome, oil on canvas, Durham Castle Collection

Aztecs in Liverpool

2014-06-AztecsAztecs in Liverpool, Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool, 3 July – 26 October 2014. Part of the Liverpool Biennial. The celebrated composer Michael Nyman, best known for his soundtracks to several Peter Greenaway films and to Jane Campion’s 1993 film The Piano, has turned photographer and film-maker. His two-screen video installation Aztecs in Liverpool was inspired by his first encounter, on a visit to Liverpool, with the late 15th to early 16th-century, Aztec Codex Fejérváry-Mayer, owned by World Museum Liverpool, the Walker’s near neighbour. A reduced-size 4-metre replica of the Codex will be shown within the display. Nyman has used the rituals and format described by the Codex pictograms as a conceptual framework for the still and moving images of Mexican street-life and high art – from pre-hispanic artefacts to contemporary culture – which he has captured over the past 20 years in his newly adopted home of Mexico. Nyman’s visual engagement with Mexican regional traditions, rituals and music is also influenced by Mexican literary and visual artists particularly their street photographers, whose work he collects. For conservation reasons the original Codex will not be on display in either the Walker of World Museum Liverpool.