Tag Archives: Installation

Andean Art in the Spanish Empire, Chicago

2015-01-Chicago-Andea Art-SpanishEmpire-Voyage-South-America-portrait-antonio-ulloa_360

A Voyage to South America: Andean Art in the Spanish Empire, New long-term installation, Art Institute of Chicago, till 26 February 2016.
The museum’s first presentation of work from the viceregal period. Fourteen paintings and related works on paper introduce visitors to explorers, artists, and patrons who lived in the Spanish-governed Andes during the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries.
The metaphorical guide of this journey is Antonio de Ulloa (1716–95), a Spanish naval officer and cartographer who traveled to South America with a French scientific mission in the 1730s and 1740s. His portrait introduces the group of works assembled—paintings of identified sitters, signal works by important South American artists, and devotional paintings that include historical figures.

Juan DelGado’s audiovisual commission ‘The Flickering Darkness (Revisited)’ – Sat 8 Nov 2014 – CILAVS at Birkbeck University of London

The Centre for Iberian and Latin American Visual Studies (CILAVS) at Birkbeck University of London warmly invites you to

Juan delGado
The Flickering Darkness (Revisited)

Saturday 8 November 2015, 2.00-5.00pm
Birkbeck Cinema, 43 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PD

Artist Juan delGado will present his recent commission The Flickering Darkness (Revisited) alongside the work by Agata Lulkowska. A panel will analyse and reflect on his audiovisual work to improve the understanding of current food policies and their impact in society and art by elaborating on the political and economic factors that promote them.

Juan delGado’s The Flickering Darkness (Revisited) is a video installation filmed at the Corabastos market in Bogotá. The market is the largest of its kind in Latin America. Produced during a three-month residency in the city in 2009 and re-edited for this exhibition, the project explores the journey produce sold at the market takes, from its arrival before dawn to its consumption. Reflecting on the idea of belonging, and the need we all have for locating ourselves in an environment, it creates sense out of the city’s chaos and order, while inviting wider reflections on society’s strata and how they fit together.

For more details visit http://www.bbk.ac.uk/cilavs/events#delGado

Please follow the link below to register

http://www.eventbrite.com/e/panel-discussion-the-flickering-darkness-the-implications-of-food-policy-in-society-and-art-tickets-13334119711

2014-06-Cristina Rodriguez-Women from my country Cristina Rodrigues: Women from My Country, Manchester Cathedral, 3 July – 21 September. A 3-part installation, sponsored by the Arts Council, will be unveiled by the Portuguese-born Manchester-based artist. The 3 works are individually entitled The Queen, Enlightenment and Blanket, the latter made from adufes, square tambourines traditionally played by women in central inland Portugal, woven together with Portuguese lace and multi-coloured ribbons braided by local Manchester women.

Aztecs in Liverpool

2014-06-AztecsAztecs in Liverpool, Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool, 3 July – 26 October 2014. Part of the Liverpool Biennial. The celebrated composer Michael Nyman, best known for his soundtracks to several Peter Greenaway films and to Jane Campion’s 1993 film The Piano, has turned photographer and film-maker. His two-screen video installation Aztecs in Liverpool was inspired by his first encounter, on a visit to Liverpool, with the late 15th to early 16th-century, Aztec Codex Fejérváry-Mayer, owned by World Museum Liverpool, the Walker’s near neighbour. A reduced-size 4-metre replica of the Codex will be shown within the display. Nyman has used the rituals and format described by the Codex pictograms as a conceptual framework for the still and moving images of Mexican street-life and high art – from pre-hispanic artefacts to contemporary culture – which he has captured over the past 20 years in his newly adopted home of Mexico. Nyman’s visual engagement with Mexican regional traditions, rituals and music is also influenced by Mexican literary and visual artists particularly their street photographers, whose work he collects. For conservation reasons the original Codex will not be on display in either the Walker of World Museum Liverpool.