Tag Archives: London

INSCRIBING COLONIALISM IN FIFTEENTH-CENTURY PORTUGAL, 26 MARCH 2019, QMUL

The next meeting of the Maius Workshop will take place tomorrow,26 March, 4:30–5:30pm, in room Law G3 at QMUL (335 Mile End Rd, London E1 4FQ). Click here for a map of the Campus.

Jessica Barker, Lecturer in Medieval History at the Courtauld Institute of Art, will lead a seminar entitled Inscribing Colonialism in Fifteenth-Century Portugal. The session will consider inscriptions, readability and visibility in funerary monuments, and their intersections with early Portuguese explorations in West Africa.

Maius is a friendly platform for informal dialogue and collaborative research. Our sessions are open to all, and research in early stages of development is especially welcome. We look forward to seeing you at this event, and please feel free to email us with ideas and suggestions for future meetings.

Image: Detail of inscription on the north side of the monument to João I and Philippa of Lancaster, 1426–34. Founder’s Chapel, monastery of Santa Maria da Vitória, Batalha. Photo: Jessica Barker.

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ARTES Glendinning Lecture: Javier Barón, ‘Two Masters of the Prado: Velázquez, El Greco and Modern Painting’, Instituto Cervantes, London, 27 February 2019

Screenshot 2019-02-01 at 13.31.04This year’s Glendinning Lecture, an annual event in honour of the great Hispanist Nigel Glendinning, will celebrate the 200th anniversary of the Museo Nacional del Prado.

Dr Javier Barón will deliver a lecture on how Velázquez and El Greco influenced modern painting.

From its opening in 1819, the Prado offered artists a unique opportunity to study the oeuvre of Spanish Old Masters, especially Murillo, Velázquez and El Greco. This was, precisely, the chronological order in which these masters influenced foreign painters.

During the nineteenth century, Velázquez was the most appreciated Spanish master. The Prado owned the most extensive collection of this artist in the world. So, many painters, amongst them Wilkie, Courbet, Manet, Renoir, Sargent, Chase and others came to Madrid to see his masterworks. Velázquez’s approach to everyday life, as well as his large and loose brushstrokes, were relevant to naturalistic painters.

El Greco was especially appreciated after the first monographic exhibition of his work took place at the Prado in 1902. His influence was already important in the mainstream renewal of painting spearheaded by Pablo Picasso and cubism in Paris. At the same time, El Greco was the major reference for Central European Expressionism. American artists also appreciated the suggestiveness of his painting when seeking to lay the foundation of their own modernity.

Javier Barón is Doctor in History of Art by the University of Oviedo, where he was graduated with honours back in 1989. Before joining Prado Museum, he was a professor of Art History at the University of Oviedo (1991–2002). In 2003, Barón was appointed as Head of Nineteenth-century Painting Department at the Prado Museum, a position he held until 2014, when he became Senior Curator. He is correspondent member of the Spanish Royal Academy of History, the Spanish Royal Academy of Fine Arts and the Royal Academy of Fine Arts of San Telmo, in Málaga, as well as member of the Royal Institute of Asturian Studies, Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres, member of the Board of Trustees of the Sorolla Museum and Member of the Madrid City Council Board of Valuation of Works of Art.

Free and open to all, but please book a ticket here.

Closing Soon! ‘Ribera: Art of Violence’, Dulwich Picture Gallery, London, until 27 January 2019

ribera-martiri-de-sant-bartomeu-large-bannerThis is the first exhibition in the UK dedicated to the Spanish Baroque painter, draughtsman and printmaker Jusepe de Ribera (1591–1652). Born in Játiva, Valencia, Ribera emigrated to Italy as a young artist. Proud of his Spanish heritage, he eventually settled in Naples, then a Spanish territory, but never again returned to Spain. A hybrid figure, Ribera had a significant influence on the art of both countries in the seventeenth century.

Introducing this artist to a UK audience, the exhibition focuses on some of Ribera’s most powerful images featuring saints and sinners, flaying and flogging. Ribera’s images of pain have often been described as shocking and even grotesque in their realism. In a common historiographical trope, the artist himself has been labelled as sadistic and violent. Challenging this long-standing interpretation, Ribera: Art of Violence will reveal the complex artistic, religious and cultural discourses underpinning the artist’s violent imagery in paint and on paper. This exploration will be anchored by a number of major loans from North American and European collections, with some works travelling to the UK for the first time.

613cmo6qaylA scholarly catalogue accompanies the exhibition, showcasing the new research which has informed the display.

Ribera: Art of Violence is co-curated by ARTES committee member Dr Edward Payne, author of a PhD thesis on the theme of violence in Ribera’s art (2012) and contributor to the catalogue raisonné of Ribera’s drawings (2016), and Dr Xavier Bray (Director, The Wallace Collection), former Arturo and Holly Melosi Chief Curator at Dulwich Picture Gallery, and curator of the National Gallery’s exhibitions The Sacred Made Real: Spanish Painting and Sculpture 1600–1700 (2009) and Goya: The Portraits (2015).

 

Research Seminar: Inigo Thomas, ‘Who was Tomàs Harris?’, UCL, London, 24 January 2019

Harris, Tomas, 1908-1964; Two Olive Trees Grown Together

Tomàs Harris, Two Olive Trees Grown Together, UCL Art Museum © the artist’s estate. Photo credit: UCL Art Museum

This seminar will be dedicated to Tomàs Harris (1908–1964). Harris was a MI5 spy, but also a painter of Spanish landscapes and a scholar of Spanish art. His outstanding collection of prints by Goya is now at the British Museum.

The lecture will take place in Seminar Room 3, UCL History of Art, 20 Gordon Square, London, 6–8pm. Works made or collected by Harris will be on display at UCL Art Museum on the afternoon on the lecture, 2–5:30pm.

Click here for more information.

 

 

CEEH DOCTORAL FUNDING IN THE UK AND IRELAND

The Centro de Estudios Europa Hispánica and the Center for Spain in America (CSA) encourage studies on Spanish history, art and literature by establishing doctoral and postdoctoral scholarships at European and American universities, as well as at research centres whose holdings are particularly relevant to the knowledge of Spanish culture. They likewise establish assistantships for curatorial work at museums with significant holdings of Spanish painting.

The following doctoral scholarships are currently open for applications:

Doctoral Scholarship in Spanish Art-Historical StudiesCourtauld Institute of Art, London
Deadline: 11 January 2019

Nigel Glendinning Doctoral Studentship in Spanish Studies: Art and Literature of 17th and 18th century Spain, King’s College, University of Cambridge
Deadline: 8 February 2019

Doctoral Scholarship in Spanish Art-Historical Studies: Spanish art of the Golden Age and/or its British/European legacy up to the 19th century, Zurbarán Centre for Spanish and Latin American Art, Durham University
Awarded in association with ARTES.
Deadline: 31 March 2019

Doctoral Scholarship for the Study of Spanish Art, in memory of Rosemarie Mulcahy (1942–2012): Spanish art 1450–1750Trinity College, Dublin
Deadline: 31 March 2019

Enriqueta Harris Frankfort Bequest at the Warburg Institute, London

enquitsaNew shelving at the end of the Warburg Institute’s Photographic Collection contains the notes, papers, letters and photographs of Enriqueta Harris Frankfort (1919–2006), Curator of the Photographic Collection from 1949 to 1971, founding Honorary President of ARTES, and one of the most admired writers on Spanish painting of her generation.

All her working papers were left to the Warburg Institute with the request that they be kept together as a resource for future historians of Spanish art. Enriqueta’s bequest provides rich documentation on many artists, especially El Greco, Velázquez, Murillo and Goya.

For more information, visit the Warburg Institute‘s website.