Tag Archives: London

Lecture: ‘Bartolomé Bermejo. Master of the Spanish Renaissance’, by Akemi Herráez Vossbrink, Conference Room 1, National Gallery, London, 4 September 2019, 2:30–3:30pm

ARTES committee member Akemi Herráez Vossbrink, assistant curator of the exhibition “Bartolomé Bermejo. Master of the Spanish Renaissance” at The National Gallery, will give a lecture on the life and works of this Spanish painter.

Bartolomé Bermejo was a fifteenth-century Spanish artist whose painting technique, mixing Spanish and Netherlandish features, was unparalleled amongst his Iberian contemporaries. He had a limited output of less than twenty paintings of which seven are featured in the current National Gallery exhibition. This is the first time that six of these paintings are shown in the UK and the restoration of the National Gallery’s painting of Saint Michael Triumphs over the Devil (1468) has enabled the Gallery to showcase Bermejo’s earliest masterpiece. Following the two major Bermejo retrospectives at the Prado Museum and the MNAC (Barcelona), this exhibition features paintings ranging from different periods of Bermejo’s career demonstrating his development as he moved throughout the Crown of Aragon (mostly encompassing territories in eastern Spain). This talk will focus on the seven paintings shown in the exhibition considering them within their context and retracing Bermejo’s artistic career. Bermejo’s Saint Michael, the Acqui Terme triptych and the Desplà Pietà (reproduced above), will receive special attention in the lecture, which will compare their donors, production, intended location and historical context.

This event is for a general audience and is organised by the Instituto Cervantes — London. Free, reistration required. Click here to register.

Featured Ehixibition: ‘Urban Impulses. Latin American Photography from 1959 to 2017’, The Photographer’s Gallery, London, until 6 October 2019

Fernando Bedoya, Pinochet, 1987

Exhibition of more than 200 photographs by twentieth-century Latin American artists, selected from the extensive holdings of the London and Morocco-based collectors Leticia and Stanislas Poniatowski. The exhibition was first shown at the Rencontres d’Arles festival 2017. Among the photographs are monochrome works by the contemporary Mexican photographer Carlos Somonte, who is a lifelong friend and colleague of the film director Alfonso Cuarón, and covered the shoot of Cuarón’s black and white Oscar-winning film Roma.

Please click here for more information.

Featured Exhibition: ‘Weavers of the Clouds. Textiles from Peru’, The Fashion and Textile Museum, London, until 8 Sep 2019

Weavers of the Clouds. Textiles from Peru, The Fashion and Textile Museum, 21 June – 8 Sep 2019, brings the captivating art and textiles of Peru to the UK, showcasing some of the world’s oldest and most colourful designs. The exhibition features rarely seen objects from private collections and national museums, including full costumes, tapestries, paintings, photographs, illustrations and accessories. It examines the vibrant applied crafts, heritage and traditions of Peru, celebrating the culture and customs of the artisan and their influence on design, fashion and beyond. Each geographical region is associated with a different technique or application; the exhibition will feature weaving from the Central Highlands, felting created in the North, floral embroidery produced in Ayacucho in the South West, knitwear originating in the Highlands and machine embroidery from the Colca Valley. Exhibition highlights include a 16th-century Quipu – knotted fibres used by the Incas as a form of communication – and a four cornered hat, dating from 600 AD. A rare pre-Hispanic tunic created in orange, yellow and blue macaw feathers is displayed alongside a sequined waistcoat emblazoned with birds and flowers and a Shipibo costume from the Amazon Rainforest, embroidered to reflect the astrological map. Tapestries and weaving from a private collection include a ceremonial tunic created using a Scaffold weave; one of the most unusual weaving techniques in the world, previously existing only in the Andean region of South America. Despite dating back to 800 AD, the influence of these techniques can be seen across hundreds of years; in particular in the works of Bauhaus designers Gunta Stölzl and Anni Albers. 

The costumes and textiles on display are complemented by a selection of varied and engaging photographs by Marta Tucci, Max Milligan and Sebastian Castaneda Vita. Also on display are postcards by influential photographer Martin Chambi. Chambi was one of the earliest known indigenous Latin American photographers, whose black and white postcards, featuring images of the indigenous people of Cuzco and their costumes, helped to disseminate knowledge of Peru in the 20th Century. Postcards were an important part of Chambi’s practice; a selection of examples, dating from the 1930s, are being presented in re-creation of his iconic studio.

The Fashion and Textile Museum is a contemporary fashion museum in Bermondsey, London. Founded by British designer Zandra Rhodes in 2003, the museum is part of the Newham College of Further Education, and is open Tuesday-Sunday.

Lunchtime talk: Tobias Capwell, ‘Bermejo and the armour of an archangel’, Sainsbury Wing lecture theatre, National Gallery, London, 24 June 2019, 1–1.45 pm

Bartolomé Bermejo, ‘Saint Michael Triumphs over the Devil’ (detail), 1468 © The National Gallery, London

What is conveyed by the armour in Bermejo’s Saint Michael Triumphs over the Devil?

In this talk, Tobias Capwell reveals how Renaissance artists used the rich imagery of arms and armour to communicate messages about power and faith.

Tobias Capwell is Curator of Arms and Armour at the Wallace Collection in London, Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, and an internationally acknowledged expert on Medieval and Renaissance weapons.

Please click here for more information.

Reminder: ARTES AGM and Group Visit, V&A, London, Thursday 13 June 2019

ARTES’s AGM will take place at the V&A at 12:30 on 13 June 2019. It will be followed by a group visit to look at objects from the Iberian world in the 16th Century.

Meet at the V&A, Exhibition Road Reception, at 11:50. Sandwich lunch (GBP 5) and AGM from 12–2, followed by a group visit to look at objects from the Iberian world in the 16th and early 17th centuries.

***Attendees are asked to arrive punctually, as late arrivals may be difficult to  accommodate*** 

Please contact artesiberia@gmail.com to book a place.

‘Bartolomé Bermejo: Master of the Spanish Renaissance’ Study Morning, Thursday 27 June 2019, 9:00 am, The National Gallery, London

ARTES members are cordially invited to an informal study morning in the exhibition Bartolomé Bermejo: Master of the Spanish Renaissance, which will open on 12 June at the National Gallery, London (until 29 September 2019).

Programme (27 June 2019)

9:00 am: Meet at The National Gallery’s West Entrance (Staff Entrance to the left of the main portico on Trafalgar Square)

9:15 am: Welcome, curator’s introduction and discussion in the exhibition (led by Letizia Treves)

11:00–11:20 am: Complimentary tea and coffee in the Former Viewing Room, Wilkins Building

11:20–11:30 am: Brief overview of the exhibition Sorolla: Spanish Master of Light (Akemi Herráez) in the Former Viewing Room

11:30 am: Self-guided tour (complimentary tickets will be provided) of Sorolla: Spanish Master of Light (Sainsbury Wing, Level -2)

Attendees may leave their belongings at the West Entrance on arrival. After 11.30 am these must be checked into the Gallery’s cloakrooms. Large bags and suitcases may not be brought into the Gallery.

Please note that this study morning is by invitation only. Numbers are strictly limited and places will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. We kindly ask you to RSVP to colloquia.RSVP@ng-london.org.uk by Thursday 6 June 2019.

ARTES AGM and Group Visit, V&A, London, Thursday 13 June 2019

ARTES’s AGM will take place at the V&A at 12:30 on 13 June 2019. It will be followed by a group visit to look at objects from the Iberian world in the 16th Century.

Meet at the V&A, Exhibition Road Reception, at 11:50. Sandwich lunch (GBP 5) and AGM from 12–2, followed by a group visit to look at objects from the Iberian world in the 16th and early 17th centuries.

***Attendees are asked to arrive punctually, as late arrivals may be difficult to  accommodate*** 

Please contact artesiberia@gmail.com to book a place.

“A Lifelong Involvement with the Museo del Prado”: a lecture by Sir John Elliott at the Embassy of Spain, London, 23 May 2019

On 23 May 2019, 6pm–8.30pm, the Honorary President of ARTES, Sir John Elliott (Regius Professor Emeritus, University of Oxford), will deliver a lecture in celebration of the 200th anniversary of the Museo del Prado. The lecture will take place at the Embassy of Spain, 24 Belgrave Square, London SW1X 8QA. A limited number of tickets are available to ARTES members by emailing the Spanish Embassy (emb.londres.ofc@maec.es).  

INSCRIBING COLONIALISM IN FIFTEENTH-CENTURY PORTUGAL, 26 MARCH 2019, QMUL

The next meeting of the Maius Workshop will take place tomorrow,26 March, 4:30–5:30pm, in room Law G3 at QMUL (335 Mile End Rd, London E1 4FQ). Click here for a map of the Campus.

Jessica Barker, Lecturer in Medieval History at the Courtauld Institute of Art, will lead a seminar entitled Inscribing Colonialism in Fifteenth-Century Portugal. The session will consider inscriptions, readability and visibility in funerary monuments, and their intersections with early Portuguese explorations in West Africa.

Maius is a friendly platform for informal dialogue and collaborative research. Our sessions are open to all, and research in early stages of development is especially welcome. We look forward to seeing you at this event, and please feel free to email us with ideas and suggestions for future meetings.

Image: Detail of inscription on the north side of the monument to João I and Philippa of Lancaster, 1426–34. Founder’s Chapel, monastery of Santa Maria da Vitória, Batalha. Photo: Jessica Barker.

ARTES Glendinning Lecture: Javier Barón, ‘Two Masters of the Prado: Velázquez, El Greco and Modern Painting’, Instituto Cervantes, London, 27 February 2019

Screenshot 2019-02-01 at 13.31.04This year’s Glendinning Lecture, an annual event in honour of the great Hispanist Nigel Glendinning, will celebrate the 200th anniversary of the Museo Nacional del Prado.

Dr Javier Barón will deliver a lecture on how Velázquez and El Greco influenced modern painting.

From its opening in 1819, the Prado offered artists a unique opportunity to study the oeuvre of Spanish Old Masters, especially Murillo, Velázquez and El Greco. This was, precisely, the chronological order in which these masters influenced foreign painters.

During the nineteenth century, Velázquez was the most appreciated Spanish master. The Prado owned the most extensive collection of this artist in the world. So, many painters, amongst them Wilkie, Courbet, Manet, Renoir, Sargent, Chase and others came to Madrid to see his masterworks. Velázquez’s approach to everyday life, as well as his large and loose brushstrokes, were relevant to naturalistic painters.

El Greco was especially appreciated after the first monographic exhibition of his work took place at the Prado in 1902. His influence was already important in the mainstream renewal of painting spearheaded by Pablo Picasso and cubism in Paris. At the same time, El Greco was the major reference for Central European Expressionism. American artists also appreciated the suggestiveness of his painting when seeking to lay the foundation of their own modernity.

Javier Barón is Doctor in History of Art by the University of Oviedo, where he was graduated with honours back in 1989. Before joining Prado Museum, he was a professor of Art History at the University of Oviedo (1991–2002). In 2003, Barón was appointed as Head of Nineteenth-century Painting Department at the Prado Museum, a position he held until 2014, when he became Senior Curator. He is correspondent member of the Spanish Royal Academy of History, the Spanish Royal Academy of Fine Arts and the Royal Academy of Fine Arts of San Telmo, in Málaga, as well as member of the Royal Institute of Asturian Studies, Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres, member of the Board of Trustees of the Sorolla Museum and Member of the Madrid City Council Board of Valuation of Works of Art.

Free and open to all, but please book a ticket here.