Tag Archives: Peru

Featured Exhibition: ‘Weavers of the Clouds. Textiles from Peru’, The Fashion and Textile Museum, London, until 8 Sep 2019

Weavers of the Clouds. Textiles from Peru, The Fashion and Textile Museum, 21 June – 8 Sep 2019, brings the captivating art and textiles of Peru to the UK, showcasing some of the world’s oldest and most colourful designs. The exhibition features rarely seen objects from private collections and national museums, including full costumes, tapestries, paintings, photographs, illustrations and accessories. It examines the vibrant applied crafts, heritage and traditions of Peru, celebrating the culture and customs of the artisan and their influence on design, fashion and beyond. Each geographical region is associated with a different technique or application; the exhibition will feature weaving from the Central Highlands, felting created in the North, floral embroidery produced in Ayacucho in the South West, knitwear originating in the Highlands and machine embroidery from the Colca Valley. Exhibition highlights include a 16th-century Quipu – knotted fibres used by the Incas as a form of communication – and a four cornered hat, dating from 600 AD. A rare pre-Hispanic tunic created in orange, yellow and blue macaw feathers is displayed alongside a sequined waistcoat emblazoned with birds and flowers and a Shipibo costume from the Amazon Rainforest, embroidered to reflect the astrological map. Tapestries and weaving from a private collection include a ceremonial tunic created using a Scaffold weave; one of the most unusual weaving techniques in the world, previously existing only in the Andean region of South America. Despite dating back to 800 AD, the influence of these techniques can be seen across hundreds of years; in particular in the works of Bauhaus designers Gunta Stölzl and Anni Albers. 

The costumes and textiles on display are complemented by a selection of varied and engaging photographs by Marta Tucci, Max Milligan and Sebastian Castaneda Vita. Also on display are postcards by influential photographer Martin Chambi. Chambi was one of the earliest known indigenous Latin American photographers, whose black and white postcards, featuring images of the indigenous people of Cuzco and their costumes, helped to disseminate knowledge of Peru in the 20th Century. Postcards were an important part of Chambi’s practice; a selection of examples, dating from the 1930s, are being presented in re-creation of his iconic studio.

The Fashion and Textile Museum is a contemporary fashion museum in Bermondsey, London. Founded by British designer Zandra Rhodes in 2003, the museum is part of the Newham College of Further Education, and is open Tuesday-Sunday.

Iberian and Latin American Art at the 58th Venice Biennale

The 58th Biennale of Venice opened on 11 May. Here is a (non-comprehensive) list of Iberian and Latin American artists represented at the exhibition, which runs until 24 November 2019, and at accompanying events.

Mexican artist Teresa Margolles was awarded a Special Mention at the event’s opening ceremony. By shifting existing structures from the real world into the Exhibition halls, Margolles creates sharp and poignant works that deal with the plight of women grossly affected by the narcotics trade in her native country. Her work Muro Ciudad Juárez. 2010 can be found in the Biennale’s central pavilion at the Giardini, entitled May You Live in Interesting Times and curated by Ralph Rugoff.

Other Latin American artists invited to participate in the Biennale’s international exhibition (split between the Giardini and Arsenale) are Jill Mulleady (born in 1980 in Uruguay), Gabriel Rico (born in 1980 in Mexico) and Tomás Saraceno (born in 1973 in Argentina).

The international exhibition is accompanied by 89 national participations. Spain’s pavilion, located at the entrance of the Giardini, showcases Perforated, a collaboration between Itziar Okariz and Sergio Prego. Through performance, video, and sound, Okariz explores the displacements between the subject, the language, and its physical presence. Prego’s sculptural works relate to architecture, calling materiality into question through the use of lightweight, flexible materials that allow the form to only exist in a specific state or as a result of a continuous action on the constituent material. Both artists reiterate the alternative functions of the body in our technified society.

Brazil’s pavilion, Swinguerra, takes its title from a combination of swingueira, a popular dance movement in the north-east of Brazil, and guerra, war. Wagner & de Burca’s work focuses on the powerful expressions of popular culture in contemporary Brazil, and their complex relationship with international and local traditions.

In Uruguay’s exhibition, La casa empática, paintings, drawings, photographs, and mural works by Yamandú Canosa are arranged as a ‘landscape-territory’ of the world, an inclusive and empathic ‘total landscape’. The total landscape is completed by the intervention on the facade and by the starry sky installed in the ceiling of the pavilion.

Metáfora de las tres ventanas. Venezuela: Identidad en tiempo y espacio is the pavilion of Venezuela. Three metaphorical windows— thresholds for light, air, and the gaze—symbolise the long construction of collective history and an all-encompassing narrative filled with challenges and rebellion. Venezuela aims to promote its libertarian identity, woven over the centuries, and share it in a clear gesture of invitation to the complicity of others.

Other national pavilions are located in the Arsenale. Argentina’s exhibition, El nombre de un país/The Name of a Country is a punk, Frankensteinish bestiary that flaunts a high-fashion collection attitude. Mariana Telleria traces a highway with an infinite number of linguistic lanes, activating confusion—mixing things together, building monsters—and sustaining viewers’ awareness in a continual state of transit.

In Chile’s Pavilion, Altered Views, Voluspa Jarpa offers a proposal for decolonisation through a review of European history. Altered Views comprises three reversed cultural spaces/models: the Hegemony Museum, the Subaltern Portrait Gallery, and the Emancipating Opera. The project collects concepts that defined colony: race and cross-breeding, subordinate male subjects, cannibalism, gender, civilisation and barbarism, monarchy and republic, appealing to a critical view from a transtemporal journey.

Mexico is represented by Actos de dios/Acts of God by Pablo Vargas Lugo. This exhibition which speculates on the life of Christ to generate a non-linear narrative that raises new questions. What would happen if the man who was chosen to redeem humanity had set out to fulfil all the predictions made by the prophets about his life without being certain that he could accomplish them?

“Indios antropófagos”. A butterfly Garden in the (Urban) Jungle, the exhibition of Peru, is a paradox: a post-conceptual exploration of the fiery sensory impact of Amazon culture on certain (neo)Baroque horizons in Peruvian art, namely in Christian Bendayán’s work, where it is energised by a critical reconsideration of the Amazon as a constructed image.

Other national exhibitions are dotted around Venice. In Cannaregio, the Dominican Republic presents Naturaleza y biodiversidad en la República Dominicana. This is the country’s first independent national pavilion at the Biennale. It offers a reflection on ecological threats affecting the luxuriant local nature, the Earth and humankind.

Next to the Dominican Republic is Guatemala’s Interesting State. The term ‘interesting state’ evokes a woman who is pregnant. Acts of violence against women constitute the denial of existence. Guatemala is an ‘interesting State’ because of the persistence of this devastating phenomenon. Art therefore becomes an ethical instrument, in which the seductive aesthetic nature of the works is there to serve an indispensable social denunciation and an essential opportunity for redemption.

Portugal’s pavilion, a seam, a surface, a hinge or a knot, features artist Leonor Antunes reflecting on the functions of everyday objects and contemplating their potential to be materialised as abstract sculptures. The artist is interested in how craftsmanship traditions from various cultures intersected in the work of Venetians such as Carlo Scarpa, Savina Masieri and Egle Trincanato. Elements of the exhibition are fabricated with Falegnameria Augusto Capovilla, one of the still-active Venetian carpentries that worked closely with Scarpa.

The Cuban pavilion, located on the island of San Servolo and entitled A cautionary environment/Entorno aleccionador brings together installations, paintings, and interdisciplinary works on allegorical themes of the times in which we live. The invited artists, Alejandro Campins, Ariamna Contino, Alex Hernández and Eugenio Tibaldi, discuss the relationship between man and the environment.

The Biennale’s programme is accompanied by a series of collateral events. Catalonia in Venice’s To Lose Your Head (Idols) documents the complex life of statues, which some artists today recreate and reflect upon. This multi-authored exhibition explores the theory of art reception and documents the complex life of public statues in our time. In a world of images, iconoclasm and iconodulia, it questions the fetishism of images as living entities and encourages conversations as a way to foster human happiness, awareness and freedom.

The latest works by the contemporary Portuguese sculptor Joana Vasconcelos (born 1971) are being displayed under the title What are you hiding? May you find what you are looking for at the Venice Biennale on the island of San Clemente across the Palazzo Kempinsky gardens and in the church of San Clemente itself, supported by the film production company MGM. In the church the exhibition shows her large-scale floor sculpture Madragoa (2015­–2019), inspired by Lisbon’s buildings and façades, which explores the intersections of sculpture, architecture and painting. This piece has new elements specially created for it since it was first shown in Macau in 2015. In the gardens Vasconcelos is displaying I’ll be Your Mirror #1 (2019), a giant Venetian carnival mask made of mirrors, which the sculptor recently showed at the Guggenheim, Bilbao in a solo show. Also on show in the gardens is Betty Boop PA (2019), a high-heeled shoe crafted out of saucepans, which proposes a revision of the “feminine” in today’s world by bringing together two tropes of a woman’s private and public image.

Glass works by Vasconcelos are on view in the exhibition Glasstress 2019, which features artists Carlos Garaicoa, Javier Pérez, José Parlá, Jaume Plensa and Bernardì Roig, among others.

Javier Pérez, Carroña, 2011, glass chandelier, stuffed crows (Glasstress 2019)

New rules to protect Machu Picchu World Heritage Site

The Peruvian government announced on Friday 10 May a two-week restriction to three important areas at Machu Picchu to prevent greater degradation to the iconic Inca citadel, whose name means “old mountain” in the Quechua language indigenous to the area. The mountain-top citadel lies around 100 kilometres (60 miles) from the Andean city of Cusco, the old Inca capital in south-eastern Peru, and was built during the reign of the Inca emperor Pachacuti (1438-1471). It was rediscovered in 1911 by the American explorer Hiram Bingham and declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1983.

From May 15 to 28 2019, access to the Temple of the Sun, the Temple of the Condor and the Intihuatana Stone will be strictly controlled, the Peruvian government said. “These measures are necessary to conserve Machu Picchu, given the evidence of deterioration” on stone surfaces caused by visitors to the three areas, the culture ministry said. Almost 6,000 visitors a day are permitted onto the 15th-century site in two waves. The new plan will give tourists just three hours to visit the three emblematic areas. The authorities will evaluate the impact of the measures before applying new permanent rules from June 1.

Click here for more information.

Featured Exhibition: The Avant-garde Networks of Amauta: Argentina, Mexico, and Peru in the 1920s, Museo Nacional Reina Sofía, Madrid, until 27 May 2019

José Sabogal, Cover of the journal Amauta, n. 26 (September – October), 1929, Journal, Museo de Arte de Lima

Founded and directed by José Carlos Mariátegui, the Peruvian magazine Amauta was one of the most influential cultural and political periodicals of the early 20th century. The exhibition of more than 250 works follows Amauta’s development as a platform to explore the diversity of the avant-garde artistic production in Peru, Argentina, and Mexico and the debates that shaped the art of Latin America during the 1920s. This exhibition, organised by Beverly Adams, Curator of Latin American Art, Blanton Museum of Art, and Natalia Majluf, Director and Chief Curator, Museo de Arte de Lima, Peru addresses the avant-garde production of a vast network of artists and writers connected with Amauta. and includes works in a variety of forms ranging from paintings, drawings, sculptures and photographs through to popular ceramics, many by lesser known artists as well as pieces by Tina Modotti and Diego Rivera. A large network of correspondents in Latin America and Europe fed the magazine, which had a print run of 3-4,000, and gave Amauta an international impact.

Click here for more information on this exhibition.

The exhibition will travel from Madrid to the Museo de Arte de Lima (20 June – 22 September 2019); the Palacio de Bellas Artes, Mexico City (17 October 2019 – 12 January 2020); and finally to Blanton Museum of Art, University of Texas at Austin, Texas (February 16, 2020 – 17 May, 2020).

Featured Exhibition: Plata de los Andes, Museo de Arte de Lima, until 28 October

minis_armadillo

Armadillo-shaped perfumer
c. 1825-1830
silver
38,7 x 31,3 x 20 cm
Colección Ferrand, Lima

This exhibition showcases five centuries of Andean silver-work through more than 350 silver pieces, dating from the conquest to the 20th century.  Curated by Ricardo Kusunoki and Eduardo Wuffarden, this major show is a unique occasion to see works never previously displayed to the public, from ecclesiastical, private and public collections in Lima, Cuzco, Arequipa and elsewhere in the country.

Click here for more information.

Tomorrow: Artistic Trade between Spain and its Viceroyalties from 1500 to 1800, King’s College, Cambridge, 22 June 2018

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This is the first conference in the United Kingdom devoted to artistic trade between Spain and its viceroyalties. Referring to Cambridge’s Spanish and colonial art collections and with the indispensable support of the Nigel Glendinning studentship for Spanish studies, this conference brings together scholars specialized in the art from the Spanish Viceroyalties. The speakers will trace the artworks from their production, their movement with the help of agents and their collection and display at their destination. Such approach avoids setting an epicentre and periphery but establishes an equalitarian platform on the movement of art within the Spanish Empire.

8:30- 9:15 – Registration.

Introductory remarks:

9:15- 9:30 – Akemi Herráez Vossbrink (University of Cambridge)

Keynote speaker:

9:30- 10:00 – Luisa Elena Alcalá (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)

Passageways of Art in the Atlantic world: Artists, Patrons and Agents.

  1. Workshops and Artists Producing Art for the Spanish Viceroyalties and Transitory Spaces.

Chaired by Akemi Herráez Vossbrink (University of Cambridge)

10:00- 10:30 – Holly Trusted (Victoria and Albert Museum), Shipwrecked Ivories: The Confluence of East and West.

10:30- 11:00 – Piers Baker Bates (The Open University), Traveling between the Viceroyalties: Artistic Translation in the Sixteenth-century Hispanic World.

11:00- 11:30 – Escardiel González Estevez (Universidad de Sevilla), Alonso Vázquez between Seville, Mexico and Manila (1603-1608): The Paradigm of a “Global Artist”.

11:30- 12:00- Questions.

12:00-13:30- Lunch break.

  1. The Role of Agents Commercializing Artworks between Spain and its Viceroyalties

Chaired by José Ramón Marcaida López (University of Saint Andrews)

13:30-14:00 – Sandra Van Ginhoven (Getty Research Institute, Research Associate), Spanish Transatlantic Agents and the Flemish Guilliam Forchondt in the Overseas Paintings Trade.

14:00- 14:30 – Corinna Gramatke (Technical University of Munich Chair of Conservation-Restoration), “The Portable Europe”: European Artworks for the Jesuit Province of Paraguay (1608-1767).

14:30-15:00 – Eduardo Lamas Delgado (Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage, Brussels), Madrilenian Painters and America: Artistic Production for Overseas Trade Networks and their possible Agents.

15:00- 16:00- Questions followed by a coffee break.

  1. Collecting and Display in Private, Civil and Religious Spaces in the Spanish Viceroyalties.

Chaired by Jean Michel Massing (University of Cambridge)

16:00-16:30 – Kathryn Santner (Leverhulme Trust Fellow, ILAS, London), Conventual Art Collections and Artistic Exchange in the Colonial Viceroyalties.

16:30-17:00 – Isabel Oleas Mogollón (University of Delaware), The Divine and the Self: Uses and Meanings of Mirrors in Quito’s Jesuit Church.

17:00-17:30 – Veronika Winkler (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München), Witnessing the Saint’s Life: Patrons and Hagiographical Painting Cycles of Viceregal Peru.

17:30- 18:00- Final questions and closing remarks.

For further information please contact Akemi Herráez Vossbrink at alh64@cam.ac.uk.

To book your place, please click here

Conference: Artistic Trade between Spain and its Viceroyalties from 1500 to 1800, King’s College, Cambridge, 22 June 2018

https3a2f2fcdn-evbuc-com2fimages2f423725462f680690561952f12foriginal

This is the first conference in the United Kingdom devoted to artistic trade between Spain and its viceroyalties. Referring to Cambridge’s Spanish and colonial art collections and with the indispensable support of the Nigel Glendinning studentship for Spanish studies, this conference brings together scholars specialized in the art from the Spanish Viceroyalties. The speakers will trace the artworks from their production, their movement with the help of agents and their collection and display at their destination. Such approach avoids setting an epicentre and periphery but establishes an equalitarian platform on the movement of art within the Spanish Empire.

8:30- 9:15 – Registration.

Introductory remarks:

9:15- 9:30 – Akemi Herráez Vossbrink (University of Cambridge)

Keynote speaker:

9:30- 10:00 – Luisa Elena Alcalá (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)

Passageways of Art in the Atlantic world: Artists, Patrons and Agents.

  1. Workshops and Artists Producing Art for the Spanish Viceroyalties and Transitory Spaces.

Chaired by Akemi Herráez Vossbrink (University of Cambridge)

10:00- 10:30 – Holly Trusted (Victoria and Albert Museum), Shipwrecked Ivories: The Confluence of East and West.

10:30- 11:00 – Piers Baker Bates (The Open University), Traveling between the Viceroyalties: Artistic Translation in the Sixteenth-century Hispanic World.

11:00- 11:30 – Escardiel González Estevez (Universidad de Sevilla), Alonso Vázquez between Seville, Mexico and Manila (1603-1608): The Paradigm of a “Global Artist”.

11:30- 12:00- Questions.

12:00-13:30- Lunch break.

  1. The Role of Agents Commercializing Artworks between Spain and its Viceroyalties

Chaired by José Ramón Marcaida López (University of Saint Andrews)

13:30-14:00 – Sandra Van Ginhoven (Getty Research Institute, Research Associate), Spanish Transatlantic Agents and the Flemish Guilliam Forchondt in the Overseas Paintings Trade.

14:00- 14:30 – Corinna Gramatke (Technical University of Munich Chair of Conservation-Restoration), “The Portable Europe”: European Artworks for the Jesuit Province of Paraguay (1608-1767).

14:30-15:00 – Eduardo Lamas Delgado (Royal Institute for Cultural Heritage, Brussels), Madrilenian Painters and America: Artistic Production for Overseas Trade Networks and their possible Agents.

15:00- 16:00- Questions followed by a coffee break.

  1. Collecting and Display in Private, Civil and Religious Spaces in the Spanish Viceroyalties.

Chaired by Jean Michel Massing (University of Cambridge)

16:00-16:30 – Kathryn Santner (Leverhulme Trust Fellow, ILAS, London), Conventual Art Collections and Artistic Exchange in the Colonial Viceroyalties.

16:30-17:00 – Isabel Oleas Mogollón (University of Delaware), The Divine and the Self: Uses and Meanings of Mirrors in Quito’s Jesuit Church.

17:00-17:30 – Veronika Winkler (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München), Witnessing the Saint’s Life: Patrons and Hagiographical Painting Cycles of Viceregal Peru.

17:30- 18:00- Final questions and closing remarks.

For further information please contact Akemi Herráez Vossbrink at alh64@cam.ac.uk.

To book your place, please click here