Tag Archives: Tina Modotti

Featured Exhibition: The Avant-garde Networks of Amauta: Argentina, Mexico, and Peru in the 1920s, Museo Nacional Reina Sofía, Madrid, until 27 May 2019

José Sabogal, Cover of the journal Amauta, n. 26 (September – October), 1929, Journal, Museo de Arte de Lima

Founded and directed by José Carlos Mariátegui, the Peruvian magazine Amauta was one of the most influential cultural and political periodicals of the early 20th century. The exhibition of more than 250 works follows Amauta’s development as a platform to explore the diversity of the avant-garde artistic production in Peru, Argentina, and Mexico and the debates that shaped the art of Latin America during the 1920s. This exhibition, organised by Beverly Adams, Curator of Latin American Art, Blanton Museum of Art, and Natalia Majluf, Director and Chief Curator, Museo de Arte de Lima, Peru addresses the avant-garde production of a vast network of artists and writers connected with Amauta. and includes works in a variety of forms ranging from paintings, drawings, sculptures and photographs through to popular ceramics, many by lesser known artists as well as pieces by Tina Modotti and Diego Rivera. A large network of correspondents in Latin America and Europe fed the magazine, which had a print run of 3-4,000, and gave Amauta an international impact.

Click here for more information on this exhibition.

The exhibition will travel from Madrid to the Museo de Arte de Lima (20 June – 22 September 2019); the Palacio de Bellas Artes, Mexico City (17 October 2019 – 12 January 2020); and finally to Blanton Museum of Art, University of Texas at Austin, Texas (February 16, 2020 – 17 May, 2020).

Closing soon: México 1900–1950 (Dallas)

 

México 1900–1950
Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, José Clemente Orozco, and the Avant-Garde

Dallas Museum of Art

12 March  – 16 July, 2017

Major exhibition exploring 50 years of Mexican modern art. Following its showing at the Grand Palais, Paris, this is the exhibition’s only US venue. The result of a combined cultural endeavour between Mexico and France, the exhibition features circa 200 paintings, sculptures, photographs, drawings and films documenting Mexico’s artistic Renaissance during the first half of the 20th century. Works by the titans of Mexican Modernism are shown alongside those by lesser-known pioneers, including a number of rarely seen works by female artists. Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, José Clemente Orozco, Ángel Zárraga, Tina Modotti, and David Alfaro Siqueiros, among others, are on display.