Tag Archives: 20th century

Opens today: Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy at Tate Modern, London


Pablo Picasso The Dream (Le Rêve) 1932, Private Collection © Succession Picasso/DACS, London 2017

Co-organised by Tate Modern and the Musée Picasso, Paris, the exhibition Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy at Tate Modern chronicles an intensely creative year in the life of this artist. Focusing on representing his lover Marie-Thérèse Walter, he produced some of his most innovative compositions.
Surprisingly, this will be the Tate’s first ever solo exhibition dedicated to Picasso. Featuring paintings, drawings, and archive documents, the exhibition will reveal the man behind the myth, allowing visitors to discover the full complexity of this famous artist and of his exceptional life.


Picasso portrait to lead Sotheby’s Impressionist and Modern Art Evening Sale, 28 February 2018


Pablo Picasso, Femme au béret et à la robe quadrillée (marie-Thérèse Walter), 1937 © SUCCESSION PICASSO/DACS 2018. 

Pablo Picasso’s Femme au béret et à la robe quadrillée (Marie-Thérèse Walter) (1937) will be the star of Sotheby’s evening sale tomorrow. It is one of Picasso’s last paintings of his muse Marie-Thérèse Walter, whom he represented countless times in the 1930s. Several paintings of Marie-Thérèse will feature in the exhibition Picasso 1932: Love, Fame, Tragedy, opening on 8 March 2018 at Tate Modern, London. While works in the exhibition chronicle the romantic highpoint of their relationship, the painting auctioned by Sotheby’s marks its end. Indeed, the dark shadow surrounding Marie-Thérèse’s face may evoke Picasso’s growing passion for Dora Maar, his lover between 1935 and 1943.



Lecture: Barbaro Martinez-Ruiz, The Impossible Reflection: A New Approach to African Themes in Wifredo Lam’s Art (Cuba, 1902-1982), Oxford, 8 February 2018

Wifredo Lam, The Jungle, 1943, MOMA, New York

Thursday 08 February 2018, 5 pm, University of Oxford, Latin American Centre Seminar Room, 1 Church Walk, Oxford

Bárbaro Martínez-Ruiz (B.A the University of Havana, Ph.D. Yale University, 2004), is an Art Historian with expertise in African and Caribbean artistic, visual and religious practices, whose work challenges traditional disciplinary boundaries and examines the varied understandings of – and engagement with – ‘art’ and ‘visual culture’. Following professorships at Havana’s High Institute of Art from 1993-1997, the Rhode Island School of Design from 2002-2004 and Stanford University from 2004-2013, Martinez-Ruiz joined the University of Cape Town, where he has served as the head of the Art History and Discourse of Art Department since 2013. He is the 2017-2018 recipient of the Leverhulme Visiting Professorship, hosted by Oxford’s School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies, and a Senior Fellow at St Antony’s College. His books include Kongo Graphic Writing and Other Narratives of the Sign, Temple University Press, 2013 (English) and El Colegio de México, 2012 (Spanish); Faisal Abdu’Allah: On the Art of Dislocation, Atlantic Center of Modern Art Press, 2012 and Art and Emancipation in Jamaica: Isaac Mendes Belisario and his Worlds, Yale University Press, 2007, for which he received the College Art Association Alfred H. Barr Award. Other recent publications include Ma kisi Nsi: L’art de habitants de region de Mbanza Kongo, in Angola figures de pouvoir. (Paris: Dapper Museum Press, 2010); Writing Bodies in the Bakongo Atlantic Experience, in Performances: Challenges for Art and Anthropology. (Quai Branly Museum Press, 2010); Funerary Pots of the Kongo in Central Africa, in African Terra Cotta: A Millenary Heritage. (Geneva: Musee Barbier Mueller Press, 2008), The Impossible Reflection: A New Approach to African Themes in Wifredo Lam’s Art, in Wifredo Lam. (Miami: Perez Art Museum Press, 2008). In addition to his research and teaching, Martinez-Ruiz is an active curator, whose shows have explored issues of visual communication, dislocation and hybridity in the work of contemporary artists across the African diaspora. He also serves as an editor for the Cuban Studies Magazine and Harvard’s Transition Magazine and was a researcher for Pacific Standard Time AL at the Getty Foundation and the Museum of Latin American Art, Los Angeles California from 2014-16.

Convened by Eduardo Posada-Carbo

Featured Exhibition: Drawings by Rosario Weiss

litoBiblioteca Nacional de España, Madrid, until 22 April 2018

This exhibition features more than a hundred drawings by Rosario Weiss (Madrid, 1814‒1843) as well as a few prints and paintings. It sets out to show the work of an outstanding draughtswoman who is better known for her relationship with Francisco de Goya (1746‒1828) than for her artistic career.

Weiss was one of the few women to join the San Fernando Royal Academy of Fine Arts—as an academician of merit for History Painting—and she achieved her highest distinction in 1842 when she was appointed as drawing instructor to Isabella II and her sister, the Infanta Luisa Fernanda. She held this post for a very short time, as she died of cholera the following year.

Curated by Carlos Sánchez Díez, the display brings together works from the Biblioteca Nacional, the Museo Lázaro Galdiano, the Bibliothèque municipale de Bordeaux, the Museo del Prado, the Museo del Romanticismo and private collections, as well as pieces from other museums and Spanish public institutions.

This exhibition has been organised by the Biblioteca Nacional de España, Museo Lázaro Galdiano and Centro de Estudios Europa Hispánica.

Click here for more information.

The exhibition catalogue, About the exhibition catalogue, authored by Carlos Sánchez Díez, can be purchased on the CEEH’s website with 10% discount on online orders until 15 February.

Casa Vicens, a home designed by Gaudí, now open to the public in Barcelona


© Casa Vicens, Barcelona 2016. Photo: Pol Viladoms

The first home designed by Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí has recently opened to the public. Built between 1883 and 1885 as a summer house for the Vicens family, it is a masterpiece of riotous colour in an eclectic neo-moorish style. After over a century of transformations at the hands of various different owners, the World Heritage Site has been returned to its original disposition, while an addition constructed in 1925 has been transformed into a museum. Located in the Gràcia district and surrounded by a verdant garden, the house is open everyday, from 10 am to 8 pm.

Carrer de les Carolines, 20, 08012 Barcelona, Spain
Open daily from 10 am to 8 pm except 25 December, 1 and 6 January


Call for contributions: The idiosyncrasy of indigenism in Latin America. Plurality of sources and extra-Latin American appropriations

marina-nunez-del-prado-plegariaCall for contributions: Artelogie Journal, ‘The idiosyncrasy of indigenism in Latin America. Plurality of sources and extra-Latin American appropriations’
Deadline: March 30, 2018

Coordinated by Michele Greet (George Mason University), Anahi Luna (UNAM, Mexico), Fernanda Sarmento (Sao Paulo University), Elodie Vaudry (Paris Nanterre University)

In the mid-1920s, Peruvian intellectual José Carlos Mariátegui introduced the term “indigenism” and defined it as a Latin American avant-garde trend that manifested as a literary genre, a political ideology, and an artistic classification. Nevertheless, as Michele Greet demonstrates in Beyond National Identity: Pictorial Indigenism as a Modernist Strategy in Andean Art, 1920-1960, indigenism is also the result of a paradoxical dialectic between the national and the international spheres. This “negotiation” between the national and the international is at the heart of the problem to be addressed in the next issue of Artelogie, which invites investigations of this Latin American trend as a strategy of transculturation between Latin America and the rest of the world. Mainly studied as a centripetal movement in Latin America, we propose a consideration of indigenism as a centrifugal, plurisecular and cross-cultural phenomenon.
Indeed, it seems that in foreign cities such as Paris, indigenism was also constructed and deployed in a transnational way in response to political and cultural schema. In the 20th and 21th centuries, Europe and then the United States, among others regions, were the locations where indigenism found its intellectual, political and visual inspiration and/or the cites, where it could find its purpose. Consequently, in the post-war period, Ecuadorian Oswaldo Guayasamín (1919-1999) defends the Indian in paint via a re-reading of the works of Picasso and Bernard Buffet. Sculptors such as Marina Núñez del Prado (1910-1992), architects such as Pedro Ramírez Vásquez (1919-2013), musicians such as Theodore Valcárcel (1900-1942) also appropriate methods, techniques, and materials from outside Latin American to design buildings and compose melodies in support of the Native American cause. To these examples, we can add of course the appropriations of native traditions, in particular those from the Amazon, as well as multiple contemporary creations, both in the field of design and the visual arts.
By approaching Latin American and European art history within the framework of a simultaneously conflictive and collaborative modernity, rather than “opposing insular nationalism and alienating internationalism,” this cultural history project would reveal their common dynamics and highlight the diachronic and diasporic hybridization of contemporary visual culture. The purpose is thus to approach indigenism – or indigenisms – chronologically from the 20th to the 21st century. The aim is to analyze its construction as it has been elaborated outside of the borders of Latin America, in travel to and from foreign countries and nations with cultural indigenism and in connection with other contemporary movements addressing or related to identity politics.

Exploring the productive tensions surrounding indigenist art and considering different perceptions of this long cultural history will facilitate a rethinking of the fights for representation and self-representation undertaken by diverse cultures in Latin America. Moreover, we could correlate these analyses with other cultural phenomena dealing with identity formation, such as those in North America, Oceania and Africa.

The theme of this forthcoming issue of Artelogie deals with transfers between cultures, which are very different at different moments in history – – i.e. the pre-Colombian era- and in the space. Thus, a multidisciplinary approach seems essential, linking art history, the history of the ideas, and anthropology. In this study it is also necessary to consider the themes of political, diplomatic, and economic exchange between France and Latin American countries.

Suggested themes:

– How dialogue(s) between ” western culture ” and native groups took place
– Sources – models and counter-models – of indigenism outside Latin America
– Inversions: native portraits through the eyes of Westerners / Westerners portraits through the eyes of natives
– Indigenism and the artistic avant-garde, processes of appropriation and fracture
– Cites of the formation of indigenism outside Latin America
– How the diasporic processes of indigenism in the 19th and 20th centuries served the internal politics of Latin America
– Model and counter-model: indigenism as a reaction to and an appropriation of western models
– How the processes of hybridization interact with the concepts of heritage, tradition and innovation
– Native artistic expressions that reflect cultures founded on other values and beliefs, what are the ways to validate and interact with this diversity?

How to apply: 

-Deadline for official acceptance of original unpublished work: 30th of March 2018
– Total length of the text: characters (no more than 50000 characters or 35 pages), including title, authors’ bibliographic data and e-mails, summary, introduction, all other paragraphs considered appropriate, conclusion, acknowledgements (if necessary) and references.
– Please follow closely the style guide for authors of Artelogie: https://artelogie.revues.org/621
– Please send articles to: artelogie@gmail.com

Featured Exhibition: Picasso/Rivera: Still Life and the Precedence of Form

mm-70-1000pxPicasso/Rivera: Still Life and the Precedence of Form, Meadows Museum, Dallas, USA, until  5 November

This focused exhibition of paintings is inspired by a work in the Meadows Museum’s collection, Picasso’s Still Life in a Landscape (1915). In the early 20th century, Picasso and the Mexican artist Diego Rivera both lived and worked in Paris. Initially friends, in 1915 they fell out because Diego Rivera accused Picasso of plagiarising the foliage from one of his own paintings.

The source of Rivera’s ire was the perceived semblance between his 1915 Zapatista Landscape (The Guerrilla) and Picasso’s Seated Man (1915-16), which in its first iteration – as seen by Rivera in another visit to Picasso’s studio in August 1915 – was known as Man Seated in Shrubbery. Rivera noted acute similarities between his canvas and that of the early state of Picasso’s work; namely, both works featured a similarly structured still life set outdoors. The Mexican artist’s very specific complaint was his former mentor’s liberal borrowing of Rivera’s formulaic foliage – scumbled patches of green and white paint on a dark ground.

Picasso/Rivera: Still Life and the Precedence of Form takes as its point of departure another case study of the two artists’ works: Picasso’s Still Life in a Landscape (1915) at the Meadows, which will be displayed for the first time with Rivera’s Still Life with Gray Bowl (Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidential Library, Austin), painted in the same year. Exhibited in close proximity, these two paintings together encapsulate the two artists’ overlapping of themes and motif appropriation during that period.

Picasso/Rivera: Still Life and the Precedence of Form affords a closer look at the development of Picasso’s Still Life in a Landscape in the Meadows collection by presenting it together with its analogue from the Columbus Museum of Art as well as Rivera’s variation on the theme from Austin. The visual dialogue taking place in 1915 between these two giants of modern art will be further outlined through the display of Rivera’s 1915 Still Life with Bread Knife, a second generous loan from the Columbus Museum of Art. Beyond the rich anecdotes regarding the relationship of the two artists, this group of paintings provides an opportunity to find parallels as well as deviations between these canvases. In spite of limited wartime resources, 1914-15 proved to be a fecund era of creativity for both Picasso and Rivera.