Tag Archives: 20th century

Mexico 1968 Documentary Series, Instituto Cervantes, London, 02/10/2018 to 23/10/2018

Memorial del 68
1968 is a turning point for many countries that experienced the effects of the desire for revolution of young people, who had been born after the Second World War and did not feel the commitment of historical debt to those events and the type of life that was founded after. The Mexican case was especially painful because the student and social claims were violently repressed by the state forces that ended in what is known as the Tlatelolco massacre. On October 2 1968, more than three hundred people were killed by the army. This bloody response volatilized the desire for change and led to the start of the Olympics in Mexico, which took place between October 12 and 27, making Mexico a place visited by athletes from all over the world.
The programme will be introduced with a documentary by director Nicolás Echeverría, which recovers the voice of its protagonists, the informative display of the events and some conclusions and interpretations about them, thirty years later. Memorial del 68 allows us to understand the complexity of this year in which young Mexicans tried to change the world. Other documentary films complete the programme, which will be extended over four evenings in October, always followed by conversations with the public, a collaboration between the Institute of Mexican Studies / UNAM in London and the Cervantes Institute in London.
For more information about events in the series, click here.
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Featured Exhibition: Gala Salvador Dalí: A Room of One’s Own in Púbol, Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya, Barcelona, until 14 October

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Salvador Dalí. Gala Placidia. Galatea of the Spheres, 1952. Fundació Gala- Salvador Dalí, Figueres © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, VEGAP, Barcelona, 2018

Gala (7th September 1894 – 10th June 1982), born into a family of intellectuals from Kazan (Russia), spent her childhood in Moscow before moving to Switzerland and then Paris. There she befriended such prominent members of the surrealist movement as Max Ernst. In 1929 she travelled to Cadaqués, where she met Dalí. The two fell in love and started to live together, first during an eight-year exile in the United States and then in Portlligat, New York and Paris.

Gala, an enigmatic and intuitive lady famous as Salvador Dalí’s wife, muse and model, is the subject of this exhibition. Abandoning traditional stereotypes on the role of this figure, the show follows her transformation into a fully-fledged artist, exploring her artistic cooperation with Dalí and revealing the possible shared authorship of some works.

Click here for more information.

Featured Exhibitions: ‘Zuloaga. Character and Emotion’, Centro Cultural Bancaja, Valencia (until 26 August 2018) and ‘Sorolla and Spirituality’ (until 2 September 2018)

ZuloagaZuloaga. Character and Emotion (until 26 August 2018)

This exhibition features some 66 paintings by the Basque artist, several of which are displayed in public for the first time. Ranging in date from 1888, when Zuloaga was 18, to 1945, the works trace the artist’s development from his training in Paris to the mature work inspired by Spanish artists such as Velázquez, Ribera, Zurbarán, Goya and El Greco. The curators, Sofía Barrón y Carlos Alonso, focus on Zuloaga as both a landscapist and a portraitist. They showcase his representations of turn-of-the-century aristocracy, bourgeoisie and intellectuals, as well as his intimate portraits of family members. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue and is organised in collaboration with the Museo Zuloaga in Pedraza (Segovia) and its president, the artist’s granddaughter, María Rosa Suárez Zuloaga.

SorollaSorolla and Spirituality (until 2 September 2018)

This exhibition features the work Yo soy el pan de la vida, exhibited to the public for the first time since its recent restoration, the result of a collaboration with the owners of the work, the Lladró family. Curated by Felipe Garín, the exhibition explores the religious themes which the Valencian artist explored briefly in the earlier part of his career. It comprises six works produced between 1883 y 1899, including ¡Triste herencia!, Monja en oración, Santa ClotildeMesa petitoria, and La Virgen María, all on loan from major public collections.

Opens today: Frida Kahlo: Making Her Self Up, V&A Museum, London

640Open until 4 November 2018, this exhibition presents an extraordinary collection of personal artefacts and clothing belonging to the iconic Mexican artist Frida Kahlo. Locked away for 50 years after her death, this collection has never before been exhibited outside Mexico. Click here to book tickets and see related events.

 

Updated Programme: COLLECTING SPAIN: SPANISH DECORATIVE ARTS IN BRITAIN AND SPAIN, Hochhauser Auditorium, Victoria and Albert Museum, 8 and 9 June 2018

V&ACoordinators: Ana Cabrera and Lesley Miller

This conference explores collecting practices, attitudes to and perceptions of Spanish decorative arts in Britain and Spain from the 19thcentury onwards, and how these attitudes influenced the development of museums and museum collections in both countries. The case studies aredrawnfrom the British and Spanish museum collections.

The conference is organisedin joint sessions dealing with the same subject from British and then Spanish perspectives. The first day considers the collecting of particular media while the second day focuses on the dissemination, display and conservation of these collections. The conference includes poster sessions during the coffee breaks.

Click here to buy tickets

Programme

Friday, 8thJune 2008: Collecting Spanish Decorative Arts

10.00             Registration and collecting of conference packs; displaying of posters

10.20            Introduction

Ana Cabrera, V&A

10:30       Collecting, Display & Dissemination: The Changing Face of the Decorative Arts Collection at South Kensington, 1852-1873

Susanna Avery-Quash, National Gallery, London

Lustreware and Furniture

Chair: Holly Trusted, V&A

11.00             Collecting Spanish Lustreware at the Victoria and Albert Museum

Mariam Rosser-Owen, Asian Department, V&A

11:30            A Survey and History of the Collecting of Spanish Decorative Arts: Lustreware

Jaume Coll, Museo Nacional de Cerámica, Valencia

12.00-12.30.     COFFEE BREAK

12:30      Collecting Spanish Furniture, Woodwork and Leatherwork, 1850-1950

Nick Humphrey, Furniture, Textiles and Fashion department, V&A

13:00             Collecting Spanish Furniture in Madrid, 1880-1920

Sofía Rodríguez, Museo Nacional de Artes Decorativas, Madrid

13.30-14.30       LUNCH

Textiles and Fashion

Chair: Sonnet Stanfill, V&A

14:30             Following the Thread: Collecting Spanish Textiles at the Victoria and Albert Museum

Ana Cabrera, Marie S.-Curie Fellow, V&A

15:30             Textile Collecting in Catalonia

Silvia Carbonell, Centre de Documentació i Museu Tèxtil, Terrasa

16:00            Fashion and Spain at the Victoria and Albert Museum

Oriole Cullen, Furniture, Textiles and Fashion Department, V&A

16:30             From Dress to Fashion: The Collection of The Museo del Traje

Helena López del Hierro, Museo del Traje, Madrid

16.30-17.00       TEA BREAK

Sculpture and Plaster Casts

Chair: Edward Payne, Auckland Castle Project

17.00             A Vogue for St Francis

Xavier Bray, Wallace Collection, London

17:30       Spanish Monuments Displayed at South Kensington: Raising the Profile of Spanish Art through Plaster Casts

Holly Trusted, Sculpture, Metalwork, Ceramics and Glass Department, V&A

18:00       Electrical Treasuries: The Decorative Arts Collection from Antiquity at the Museo Nacional de Reproducciones, 1881-1915

María Bolaños, Museo Nacional de Escultura, Valladolid

18.30-19.00       DISCUSSION

Saturday, 9thJune 2008: Collecting Spanish decorative arts continued

Silver

Chair: Antonia Boström, V&A

10:15       The Scholar, the Scoundrel and the Skater: How the V&A Collections of Hispanic Silver were formed

Kirstin Kennedy, Sculpture, Metalwork, Ceramics and Glass Department, V&A

10:45             Collecting Spanish Silver

Jesús Rivas, Universidad de Murcia

11.15-11.45COFFEE BREAK

Displaying, Interpreting and Conserving Spanish Decorative Arts

Chair: Christopher Wilk, V&A

11.45            Displaying Decorative Arts in Britain and Spain. A Comparative Analysis

Isabel Rodríguez, Museo Nacional de Artes Decorativas, Madrid

12.15             Spain in the Europe 1600-1815 Galleries at the V&A

Lesley Miller, Furniture, Textiles and Fashion Department, V&A

12.45             The20th-century Galleries at the V&A

Corinna Gardner and Johanna Agerman Ross, Design, Architecture and Digital Department, V&A

13.15-14.15LUNCH

Displaying, Interpreting and conserving Spanish decorative arts

Chair: Joanna Norman, V&A

14.15             The Conservationof the Cast Courts. New Discoveries from Spanish Casts

Victor Borges, Conservation Department, V&A

14:45             Collecting in Action: Building a Spanish Gallery in Bishop Auckland

Edward Payne, The Auckland Project

15.15             Closing remarks

Joanna Norman, Head of the Victoria and Albert Research Institute (VARI)

Miguel González Suela, Directorate of the State Museum, Spanish Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports

Featured Exhibition: ‘The Art of Diplomacy: Brazilian Modernism Painted for War’

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Thea Haberfeld                Landscape, 1943

Oil on canvas
35 x 52 cm
Doncaster Museum and Art Gallery

‘‘The Art of Diplomacy: Brazilian Modernism Painted for War,’ on show at the at the Sala Brasil of London’s Brazilian Embassy until 22 June, recreates an exhibition of modern Brazilian painting held at the Royal Academy and seven regional galleries in 1944. The show was part of a concerted politic and cultural effort to cement Brazilian-British relations after the South American country’s entrance in the Allied coalition in 1942. Having successfully eluded German U-boats during the trans-Atlantic crossing and overcome the reservations of major museum directors, the paintings in the exhibitions introduced more than 100.000 visitors to the nuances of a country which was then largely unknown. Attended by such major intellectuals as T.S. Eliot and H.G. Wells, the show was a major success, resulting in several new acquisitions by British museums.

 

 

Click here to read an extensive review of this exhibition on Apollo, or visit the exhibition’s website.

The Art of Diplomacy: Brazilian Modernism Painted for War’ is at the Sala Brasil Arts Centre, Embassy of Brazil, until 22 June.

Marvel or monster? Madrid’s Torres Colón to become protected architectural heritage

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El País reports that the Colón Towers, two high-rise buildings in the vicinity of Madrid’s Plaza de Colón and Biblioteca Nacional, may soon become listed. Designed by Antonio Lamela (December 1, 1926–April 1, 2017), the towers’ suspended structure was innovative at the time of their construction, between 1967 and 1976. In the 1990s new fire regulations resulted in the construction of an art nouveau roof, known as ‘el enchufe’ (‘the plug’), which links the towers and provides access to an emergency staircase.  

According to the Asociación para la Protección de las Torres Colón, which is campaigning for the recognition of the towers’ architectural importance, ‘su valor arquitectónico, del que su sistema estructural es parte indiscutible y esencial, además de su proyección nacional e internacional, merece ser reconocido como parte del patrimonio arquitectónico madrileño.’

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