Tag Archives: Brazil

Iberian and Latin American Art at the 58th Venice Biennale

The 58th Biennale of Venice opened on 11 May. Here is a (non-comprehensive) list of Iberian and Latin American artists represented at the exhibition, which runs until 24 November 2019, and at accompanying events.

Mexican artist Teresa Margolles was awarded a Special Mention at the event’s opening ceremony. By shifting existing structures from the real world into the Exhibition halls, Margolles creates sharp and poignant works that deal with the plight of women grossly affected by the narcotics trade in her native country. Her work Muro Ciudad Juárez. 2010 can be found in the Biennale’s central pavilion at the Giardini, entitled May You Live in Interesting Times and curated by Ralph Rugoff.

Other Latin American artists invited to participate in the Biennale’s international exhibition (split between the Giardini and Arsenale) are Jill Mulleady (born in 1980 in Uruguay), Gabriel Rico (born in 1980 in Mexico) and Tomás Saraceno (born in 1973 in Argentina).

The international exhibition is accompanied by 89 national participations. Spain’s pavilion, located at the entrance of the Giardini, showcases Perforated, a collaboration between Itziar Okariz and Sergio Prego. Through performance, video, and sound, Okariz explores the displacements between the subject, the language, and its physical presence. Prego’s sculptural works relate to architecture, calling materiality into question through the use of lightweight, flexible materials that allow the form to only exist in a specific state or as a result of a continuous action on the constituent material. Both artists reiterate the alternative functions of the body in our technified society.

Brazil’s pavilion, Swinguerra, takes its title from a combination of swingueira, a popular dance movement in the north-east of Brazil, and guerra, war. Wagner & de Burca’s work focuses on the powerful expressions of popular culture in contemporary Brazil, and their complex relationship with international and local traditions.

In Uruguay’s exhibition, La casa empática, paintings, drawings, photographs, and mural works by Yamandú Canosa are arranged as a ‘landscape-territory’ of the world, an inclusive and empathic ‘total landscape’. The total landscape is completed by the intervention on the facade and by the starry sky installed in the ceiling of the pavilion.

Metáfora de las tres ventanas. Venezuela: Identidad en tiempo y espacio is the pavilion of Venezuela. Three metaphorical windows— thresholds for light, air, and the gaze—symbolise the long construction of collective history and an all-encompassing narrative filled with challenges and rebellion. Venezuela aims to promote its libertarian identity, woven over the centuries, and share it in a clear gesture of invitation to the complicity of others.

Other national pavilions are located in the Arsenale. Argentina’s exhibition, El nombre de un país/The Name of a Country is a punk, Frankensteinish bestiary that flaunts a high-fashion collection attitude. Mariana Telleria traces a highway with an infinite number of linguistic lanes, activating confusion—mixing things together, building monsters—and sustaining viewers’ awareness in a continual state of transit.

In Chile’s Pavilion, Altered Views, Voluspa Jarpa offers a proposal for decolonisation through a review of European history. Altered Views comprises three reversed cultural spaces/models: the Hegemony Museum, the Subaltern Portrait Gallery, and the Emancipating Opera. The project collects concepts that defined colony: race and cross-breeding, subordinate male subjects, cannibalism, gender, civilisation and barbarism, monarchy and republic, appealing to a critical view from a transtemporal journey.

Mexico is represented by Actos de dios/Acts of God by Pablo Vargas Lugo. This exhibition which speculates on the life of Christ to generate a non-linear narrative that raises new questions. What would happen if the man who was chosen to redeem humanity had set out to fulfil all the predictions made by the prophets about his life without being certain that he could accomplish them?

“Indios antropófagos”. A butterfly Garden in the (Urban) Jungle, the exhibition of Peru, is a paradox: a post-conceptual exploration of the fiery sensory impact of Amazon culture on certain (neo)Baroque horizons in Peruvian art, namely in Christian Bendayán’s work, where it is energised by a critical reconsideration of the Amazon as a constructed image.

Other national exhibitions are dotted around Venice. In Cannaregio, the Dominican Republic presents Naturaleza y biodiversidad en la República Dominicana. This is the country’s first independent national pavilion at the Biennale. It offers a reflection on ecological threats affecting the luxuriant local nature, the Earth and humankind.

Next to the Dominican Republic is Guatemala’s Interesting State. The term ‘interesting state’ evokes a woman who is pregnant. Acts of violence against women constitute the denial of existence. Guatemala is an ‘interesting State’ because of the persistence of this devastating phenomenon. Art therefore becomes an ethical instrument, in which the seductive aesthetic nature of the works is there to serve an indispensable social denunciation and an essential opportunity for redemption.

Portugal’s pavilion, a seam, a surface, a hinge or a knot, features artist Leonor Antunes reflecting on the functions of everyday objects and contemplating their potential to be materialised as abstract sculptures. The artist is interested in how craftsmanship traditions from various cultures intersected in the work of Venetians such as Carlo Scarpa, Savina Masieri and Egle Trincanato. Elements of the exhibition are fabricated with Falegnameria Augusto Capovilla, one of the still-active Venetian carpentries that worked closely with Scarpa.

The Cuban pavilion, located on the island of San Servolo and entitled A cautionary environment/Entorno aleccionador brings together installations, paintings, and interdisciplinary works on allegorical themes of the times in which we live. The invited artists, Alejandro Campins, Ariamna Contino, Alex Hernández and Eugenio Tibaldi, discuss the relationship between man and the environment.

The Biennale’s programme is accompanied by a series of collateral events. Catalonia in Venice’s To Lose Your Head (Idols) documents the complex life of statues, which some artists today recreate and reflect upon. This multi-authored exhibition explores the theory of art reception and documents the complex life of public statues in our time. In a world of images, iconoclasm and iconodulia, it questions the fetishism of images as living entities and encourages conversations as a way to foster human happiness, awareness and freedom.

The latest works by the contemporary Portuguese sculptor Joana Vasconcelos (born 1971) are being displayed under the title What are you hiding? May you find what you are looking for at the Venice Biennale on the island of San Clemente across the Palazzo Kempinsky gardens and in the church of San Clemente itself, supported by the film production company MGM. In the church the exhibition shows her large-scale floor sculpture Madragoa (2015­–2019), inspired by Lisbon’s buildings and façades, which explores the intersections of sculpture, architecture and painting. This piece has new elements specially created for it since it was first shown in Macau in 2015. In the gardens Vasconcelos is displaying I’ll be Your Mirror #1 (2019), a giant Venetian carnival mask made of mirrors, which the sculptor recently showed at the Guggenheim, Bilbao in a solo show. Also on show in the gardens is Betty Boop PA (2019), a high-heeled shoe crafted out of saucepans, which proposes a revision of the “feminine” in today’s world by bringing together two tropes of a woman’s private and public image.

Glass works by Vasconcelos are on view in the exhibition Glasstress 2019, which features artists Carlos Garaicoa, Javier Pérez, José Parlá, Jaume Plensa and Bernardì Roig, among others.

Javier Pérez, Carroña, 2011, glass chandelier, stuffed crows (Glasstress 2019)
Advertisements

Featured Exhibition: Tarsila do Amaral. Cannibalizing Modernism, Museu de Arte de Sao Paulo Assis Chateaubriand, Sao Paulo, Brazil, until 28 July 2019

This is the most comprehensive exhibition dedicated to the work of Brazilian artist Tarsila do Amaral (1886–1973), a pioneering figure in early 20th century Latin American art and who is currently being reassessed in the context of global modernisms. After studying with Fernand Léger (1881–1955) and André Lhote (1885–1962) in Paris, Tarsila, as she is widely known in Brazil, cannibalized modern European references to create a unique style of her own, true to her origins both in form and content, through the use of caipira [Brazilian countryside] colours, found in architecture and decorative arts: “pure blue, violaceous rose, bright yellow, singing green,” in her own words;  as well as representations of typical and local characters, scenes, and narratives. Much of her work was made in dialogue with two leading modernist intellectuals of her time: Mário de Andrade (1893–1945) and Oswald de Andrade (1890–1954). Tarsila’s work parallels the development of Oswald de Andrade’s antropofagia, a key concept in 20th-century Latin American thought. Antropofagia could be understood as a poetic program through which intellectuals in the tropics would ‘cannibalize’ European cultural references in order to produce something singular and hybrid of their own, bringing indigenous, Afro-Atlantic, and local elements into their work. The controversial painting A Negra [The Black Woman] has received special attention from the authors and is a central work in the exhibition. The exhibition aims at widening the perspectives from which we may access not only the artist’s work but also the larger narratives on global modernism, taking into account questions of race, class and colonialism.

Tarsila do Amaral: Cannibalizing Modernism is curated by Adriano Pedrosa and Fernando Oliva and is contextualized in a full year dedicated to women artists at MASP in 2019 under the heading Women’s Histories, Feminist Histories. The accompanying publication is the most comprehensive exhibition catalogue on Tarsila to date. With separate editions in Portuguese and in English, 360 pages each, it reproduces 113 of her works, as well as documents and photographs. The book features newly commissioned essays by Adriano Pedrosa, Amanda Carneiro, Fernando Oliva, Irene V. Small, Mari Rodríguez Binnie, Maria Bernardete Ramos Flores, Maria Castro, Michele Greet, Michele Bete Petry and Renata Bittencourt, historical texts by Paulo Herkenhoff and Sergio Miceli, and commentaries on Tarsila’s works by Artur Santoro, Carlos Eduardo Riccioppo, Guilherme Giufrida, and Matheus de Andrade.


Click here for more information.

Featured Exhibition: ‘The Art of Diplomacy: Brazilian Modernism Painted for War’

pinturas-thea-haberfeld_landscape-01

Thea Haberfeld                Landscape, 1943

Oil on canvas
35 x 52 cm
Doncaster Museum and Art Gallery

‘‘The Art of Diplomacy: Brazilian Modernism Painted for War,’ on show at the at the Sala Brasil of London’s Brazilian Embassy until 22 June, recreates an exhibition of modern Brazilian painting held at the Royal Academy and seven regional galleries in 1944. The show was part of a concerted politic and cultural effort to cement Brazilian-British relations after the South American country’s entrance in the Allied coalition in 1942. Having successfully eluded German U-boats during the trans-Atlantic crossing and overcome the reservations of major museum directors, the paintings in the exhibitions introduced more than 100.000 visitors to the nuances of a country which was then largely unknown. Attended by such major intellectuals as T.S. Eliot and H.G. Wells, the show was a major success, resulting in several new acquisitions by British museums.

 

 

Click here to read an extensive review of this exhibition on Apollo, or visit the exhibition’s website.

The Art of Diplomacy: Brazilian Modernism Painted for War’ is at the Sala Brasil Arts Centre, Embassy of Brazil, until 22 June.

Featured Exhibition: Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium

xlarge_helio_oiticica-to_organize_delirium-3

Hélio Oiticica (b. 1937), Tropicália, 1966–67. Plants, sand, birds, and poems by Roberta Camila Salgado. César and Claudio Oiticica Collection, Rio de Janeiro. © César and Claudio Oiticica, Rio de Janeiro. Image courtesy Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh. Photograph by Bryan Conley

Hélio Oiticica. To Organize Delirium, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Closes 1 October 201

Final venue of a tour around America for this exhibition, considered to be the first comprehensive retrospective in the USA of the Brazilian artist (1937-1980). Ranging from geometric paintings to immersive interactive environments and wearable works of art, the exhibition is also the first to explore in depth his New York years (1971-78) and his return to Rio (1978-80).  It includes a restaging of his installation Eden, which was first revealed at the Whitechapel Art Gallery, London, in 1969, and which included a pool of water, a sand-box in which visitors were encouraged to sit and a tent where the audience could listen to music and read magazines. Eden was an expression of Oiticica’s view that in order to encourage creativity one needed time to relax and think. The installation is reconstructed with help from the artist’s nephew César Oiticica Filho, the curator of the Project Hélio Oiticica in Brazil. A fully illustrated catalogue covering the artist’s entire career with essays by authors from the USA and Latin America accompanies the exhibition.

Closing Soon: Lygia Pape: A Multitude of Forms @ Met Breuer, New York, 21 March – 23 July 2017

The first monographic exhibition in the United States devoted to Brazilian artist Lygia Pape (1927–2004). A critical figure in the development of Brazilian modern art, and a pioneer of the Neo-Concrete movement. Pape combined geometric abstraction with notions of body, time, and space in unique ways that radically transformed the nature of the art object in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Covering a prolific career that spanned five decades, this exhibition examines Pape’s rich oeuvre as manifest across varied media—from sculpture, prints, and painting to installation, photography, performance, and film.

For more information visit: Lygia Pape: A Multitude of Forms

Image Caption: Lygia Pape (Brazilian, 1927–2004). Divisor (Divider), 1968. Performance at Museu de Arte Moderna, Rio de Janeiro, 1990. Photo by Paula Pape. © Projeto Lygia Pape. Source: Metropolitan Museum.

Latin America in Construction: Architecture 1955-1980: New York

torres del parque
Exhibition:
Latin America in Construction: Architecture 1955-1980
New York, Museum of Modern Art
March 29, 2015–July 19, 2015

Brings together models, drawings and archival photographs as well as new photography of key buildings, not only those by the Brazilian Oscar Niemeyer and Mexican Luis Barragán but also less well known structures by Cuban architects, such as Hugo d’Acosta.
The exhibition is accompanied by two major publications: a catalogue and an anthology of primary texts translated from Spanish and Portuguese.

CFP: El Retablo en el espacio Iberoamericano (Lisbon, 26-27 Nov 2015)

2015-03-RetabloLisbonCFP:
El Retablo en el espacio Iberoamericano
Lisbon, Portugal, November 26 – 27, 2015

Deadline: Apr 30, 2015

El Instituto de História da Arte de la Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas da Universidade Nova de Lisboa organiza el I Simpósio de Historia del Arte – El Retabulo en el espacio Iberoamericano: Forma, función e iconografía, que tendrá lugar en la Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas, el 26 y 27 de noviembre de 2015.
Se invita a todos los interessados a enviar sus propuestas sobre el retablo en el espacio Iberoamericano teniendo en cuenta los siguientes temas:
– El retablo Iberoamericano: identidades, transferencias y asimilaciones.
– El retablo y el espacio: diseño, arquitectura, pintura y escultura.
– El retablo y la iconografía: interpretación, significado y función.
– El patrimonio retablístico: conservación, restauración, defensa y valorización.
Más informaciones: https://retabuloiberoamericano.wordpress.com/