Tag Archives: cultural relations

RECORDING: Piers Baker-Bates, ‘”In the Spanish Fashion”: An Italian-Spanish Cultural Relationship Reconsidered’. Online talk for the Research Seminar Series organized by ARTES and the Zurbarán Centre For Spanish and Latin American Art

Recording of Piers Baker-Bates’ talk delivered online on January 13th, 2021, as part of the research seminar series organized by Durham University’s Zurbarán Centre For Spanish and Latin American Art with ARTES Iberian & Visual Culture Group, with the collaboration of Instituto Cervantes in the UK

This is the first in a series of 12 seminars, many of which will also be recorded and available on the ARTES site.

The weekly sessions usually take place on Wednesdays, 6.00-7.00pm, except the fourth session scheduled for Tuesday, 2 February. The talks last ca. 40 minutes and are followed by Q&A.

The series is free and open to all with an interest in the visual arts. Booking is essential. Please email the Zurbarán Centre (Zurbaran.centre@durham.ac.uk) to register and to receive a zoom link. Please note registration closes 24 hours before the seminar.

Please click here for more information.

Featured Exhibition: ‘The Art of Diplomacy: Brazilian Modernism Painted for War’

pinturas-thea-haberfeld_landscape-01

Thea Haberfeld                Landscape, 1943

Oil on canvas
35 x 52 cm
Doncaster Museum and Art Gallery

‘‘The Art of Diplomacy: Brazilian Modernism Painted for War,’ on show at the at the Sala Brasil of London’s Brazilian Embassy until 22 June, recreates an exhibition of modern Brazilian painting held at the Royal Academy and seven regional galleries in 1944. The show was part of a concerted politic and cultural effort to cement Brazilian-British relations after the South American country’s entrance in the Allied coalition in 1942. Having successfully eluded German U-boats during the trans-Atlantic crossing and overcome the reservations of major museum directors, the paintings in the exhibitions introduced more than 100.000 visitors to the nuances of a country which was then largely unknown. Attended by such major intellectuals as T.S. Eliot and H.G. Wells, the show was a major success, resulting in several new acquisitions by British museums.

 

 

Click here to read an extensive review of this exhibition on Apollo, or visit the exhibition’s website.

The Art of Diplomacy: Brazilian Modernism Painted for War’ is at the Sala Brasil Arts Centre, Embassy of Brazil, until 22 June.