Tag Archives: Picasso

Featured exhibition: Picasso, Braque, Gris, Blanchard, Miró y Dalí. Grandes Figuras de la Vanguardia, Museo de Bellas Artes de Asturias, Oviedo, until 6 January 2019

The exhibition Picasso, Braque, Gris, Blanchard, Miró y Dalí. Grandes Figuras de la Vanguardia will showcase eight works from the Colección Masaveu and the Colección Pedro Masaveu. All these works were collected by the Masaveu family, a Catalan dynasty of entrepreneurs and philanthropists who settled in Asturias in 1840. The exhibition is the result of a collaboration between the Museo de Bellas Artes de Asturias, the Fundación María Cristina Masaveu Peterson and the Corporación Masaveu. It has been curated by Alfonso Palacio, the director of the Museo de Bellas Artes de Asturias. A 17-page leaflet guide to the exhibition can be downloaded by clicking here.

Click here for more information on this exhibition.

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Opens today: Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy at Tate Modern, London

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Pablo Picasso The Dream (Le Rêve) 1932, Private Collection © Succession Picasso/DACS, London 2017

Co-organised by Tate Modern and the Musée Picasso, Paris, the exhibition Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy at Tate Modern chronicles an intensely creative year in the life of this artist. Focusing on representing his lover Marie-Thérèse Walter, he produced some of his most innovative compositions.
Surprisingly, this will be the Tate’s first ever solo exhibition dedicated to Picasso. Featuring paintings, drawings, and archive documents, the exhibition will reveal the man behind the myth, allowing visitors to discover the full complexity of this famous artist and of his exceptional life.

Picasso portrait to lead Sotheby’s Impressionist and Modern Art Evening Sale, 28 February 2018

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Pablo Picasso, Femme au béret et à la robe quadrillée (marie-Thérèse Walter), 1937 © SUCCESSION PICASSO/DACS 2018. 

Pablo Picasso’s Femme au béret et à la robe quadrillée (Marie-Thérèse Walter) (1937) will be the star of Sotheby’s evening sale tomorrow. It is one of Picasso’s last paintings of his muse Marie-Thérèse Walter, whom he represented countless times in the 1930s. Several paintings of Marie-Thérèse will feature in the exhibition Picasso 1932: Love, Fame, Tragedy, opening on 8 March 2018 at Tate Modern, London. While works in the exhibition chronicle the romantic highpoint of their relationship, the painting auctioned by Sotheby’s marks its end. Indeed, the dark shadow surrounding Marie-Thérèse’s face may evoke Picasso’s growing passion for Dora Maar, his lover between 1935 and 1943.

 

 

Featured Exhibition: Picasso/Rivera: Still Life and the Precedence of Form

mm-70-1000pxPicasso/Rivera: Still Life and the Precedence of Form, Meadows Museum, Dallas, USA, until  5 November

This focused exhibition of paintings is inspired by a work in the Meadows Museum’s collection, Picasso’s Still Life in a Landscape (1915). In the early 20th century, Picasso and the Mexican artist Diego Rivera both lived and worked in Paris. Initially friends, in 1915 they fell out because Diego Rivera accused Picasso of plagiarising the foliage from one of his own paintings.

The source of Rivera’s ire was the perceived semblance between his 1915 Zapatista Landscape (The Guerrilla) and Picasso’s Seated Man (1915-16), which in its first iteration – as seen by Rivera in another visit to Picasso’s studio in August 1915 – was known as Man Seated in Shrubbery. Rivera noted acute similarities between his canvas and that of the early state of Picasso’s work; namely, both works featured a similarly structured still life set outdoors. The Mexican artist’s very specific complaint was his former mentor’s liberal borrowing of Rivera’s formulaic foliage – scumbled patches of green and white paint on a dark ground.

Picasso/Rivera: Still Life and the Precedence of Form takes as its point of departure another case study of the two artists’ works: Picasso’s Still Life in a Landscape (1915) at the Meadows, which will be displayed for the first time with Rivera’s Still Life with Gray Bowl (Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidential Library, Austin), painted in the same year. Exhibited in close proximity, these two paintings together encapsulate the two artists’ overlapping of themes and motif appropriation during that period.

Picasso/Rivera: Still Life and the Precedence of Form affords a closer look at the development of Picasso’s Still Life in a Landscape in the Meadows collection by presenting it together with its analogue from the Columbus Museum of Art as well as Rivera’s variation on the theme from Austin. The visual dialogue taking place in 1915 between these two giants of modern art will be further outlined through the display of Rivera’s 1915 Still Life with Bread Knife, a second generous loan from the Columbus Museum of Art. Beyond the rich anecdotes regarding the relationship of the two artists, this group of paintings provides an opportunity to find parallels as well as deviations between these canvases. In spite of limited wartime resources, 1914-15 proved to be a fecund era of creativity for both Picasso and Rivera.

Featured exhibition: Picasso. Ceramics from the Attenborough Collection

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Pablo Picasso, Heads of Women, Aztec vase, 1957. Image by kind permission of the Estate of Lord and Lady Attenborough and The Leicester Arts and Museums Service. © Succession Picasso/DACS, London 2017.

Picasso. Ceramics from the Attenborough Collection, York Art Gallery, York. Closes 5 November 2017.

Lord and Lady Attenborough began collecting ceramics by Picasso in 1954 and continued collecting for over 50 years, building one of the most significant private collections in the UK. Highlights from their collection have been loaned to York by the New Walk Museum and Art Gallery, Leicester. The Picasso ceramics created in the 1950s will be shown within York Art Gallery’s Centre of Ceramic Art (CoCA), which showcases ceramics by more than 600 artists including the founders of the British Studio Ceramics movement.

Exhibition: Picasso and the Mediterranean, @ Fundación Canal, Madrid

_CACHE_20-FPCN-1858-PAN-R-BAJA_415x0Picasso and the Mediterranean
Fundación Canal, Calle Mateo Inurria, Madrid
1 June – 15 August 2017

Free exhibition of 91 works, mainly ceramics and prints, selected from the Picasso Museo Casa Natal in Málaga. About half the exhibition is devoted to the inspiration Picasso drew from bull-fighting and its rituals and includes his series of Toro lithographs from 1945-1946, which encompass naturalistic, cubist and surreal representations of the animal. Two other sections focus on the influence of Greco-Roman antiquity on Picasso’s nudes and mythological figures and the final section includes works showing the influence of ancient cultures including that of the Arab world.

For more information, click here: Picasso and the Mediterranean

Image: © Sucesión Pablo Picasso, VEGAP, Madrid, 2017. Source: Fundación Canal

Closing soon: Picasso and Naples: Parade

Picasso and Naples: Parade
Museo di Capodimonte, Naples,
and the Antiquarium, Pompeii
8 April-10 July 2017

Exhibition across two venues celebrating the centennial of Picasso’s trip to Italy in 1917. The artist arrived in Rome on February 18, 1917, in the company of Jean Cocteau, with whom he was working on the designs for Parade, a ballet for Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes (with music by Eric Satie).Spending a little over two months in Italy, Picasso visited Naples twice, in March and April 2017. The displays include examples of Picasso’s stage and costume designs not only for Parade but also for Petrushka.

Catalogue

Click here for Joffrey Ballet’s revival of Parade