Tag Archives: Picasso

Online Resources from the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and MoMA

Since 2016, MoMA and the Guggenheim Museum have worked on digitising exhibition catalogues and other material related to their displays and collections.

MoMA’s ‘Exhibition History‘ page offers access to photographs, interpretation, checklists and other material for 4,918 exhibitions from the museum’s founding in 1929 to the present. ARTES members may be particularly interested to discover a 1931 exhibition dedicated to Diego Rivera, the show American Sources of Modern Art (Aztec, Mayan, Incan) of 1933, the ground-breaking Cubism and Abstract Art of 1936, the 1939 show Picasso: Forty years of his art and exhibitions dedicated to the Brazilian artist Candido Portinari and to Joan Miró in 1940. The archive offers a way to explore the museum’s history during its closure for refurbishment and redisplay (re-opens October 21).

On archive.org, art lovers and researchers can read and download more than 200 catalogues published by the Guggenheim Museum. Highlights include the exhibition Tauromaquia (Collezione Peggy Guggenheim, Venice, 1985), Berriaren tradizioa: Guggenheim bildumako maisulanak, 1945–1990 (Museo de Bellas Artes de Bilbao, 1995), and The Aztec Empire (Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 2004).

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Closing Soon: ‘Olga Picasso’, Museo Picasso Málaga, until 2 June

Pablo Picasso, Olga Pensive (winter 1923), Musée national Picasso-Paris (c) RMN-Grand Palais (Musée national Picasso-Paris)/Mathieu Rabeau, Sucesión Pablo Picasso, VEGAP, Madrid, 2018

The Museo Picasso Málaga presents Picasso’s first wife Olga Khokhlova and her story in the first show of its 2019 exhibition calendar. The exhibition Olga Picasso was inspired by the letters and photographs found in the travel trunk of the Russian dancer, Bernard Ruiz-Picasso’s grandmother. The exhibition focuses on the years of Olga’s relationship with Picasso. It offers context on the creation of some of Picasso’s greatest works, connecting them with a personal story that developed alongside another, political and social, story.

Olga Khokhlova (Nezhin, Ukraine, 1891– Cannes, France, 1955) was the daughter of a colonel in the Russian Imperial Army. In 1911 she joined the prestigious and innovative Ballet Russes company, which was at that time highly successful in Europe under the direction of Serguei Diaghilev. She first met Pablo Picasso in Rome in the spring of 1917, when the artist was designing the sets and costumes for the ballet Parade. They were married in Paris, on 12th July 1918, and their first and only child, Paul, was born in February 1921. The couple separated in 1935, although they remained married until Olga’s death in Cannes, in 1955.

The Russian ballerina’s travel trunk, which her son received when he inherited the chateau of Boisgeloup—currently owned by the Fundación Almine y Bernard Ruiz-Picasso para el Arte (FABA)—contained previously unseen letters and photographs. For many years, the drawers harboured Kodak envelopes full of photos that told the story of Bernard’s grandparents, their life together, their travels, Picasso’s ateliers and more. In other compartments lay hundreds of letters in French and Russian, tied with little pink or blue silk ribbons. Olga’s trunk, engraved with her initials, also held her dance attire, ballet shoes, tutus, programmes and such personal objects as a Crucifix and a Russian Orthodox Bible. The contents of the trunk, which was the only personal belonging Olga kept after her separation from Picasso, revealed new aspects of the artist’s work during their relationship.

Approximately 350 items will be shown in the exhibition, including paintings, works on paper, photographs, letters, documents and films. It has been jointly curated by Émilia Philippot, conservator of the Musée national Picasso-Paris; Joachim Pissarro, professor of art history and director of Hunter College Art Gallery (New York); and Bernard Ruiz-Picasso, co-chair of the Fundación Almine y Bernard Ruiz-Picasso para el Arte, FABA, president of the Executive Board of Museo Picasso Málaga and member of its Board of Trustees. The exhibition has been adapted for Museo Picasso Málaga by José Lebrero, the museum’s artistic director, and Sofía Díaz, its exhibitions coordinator.

Click here for more information.

The exhibition will travel from Málaga to Madrid, where it will be on show at the CaixaForum from 19 June to 22 September 2019. Click here for details.

Featured Exhibition: Picasso’s Women: Fernande to Jacqueline, Gagosian, New York, until 22 June 2019

The art dealers Gagosian, New York, in partnership with members of the Picasso family, present an exhibition in honour of their late friend and colleague, Sir John Richardson, the eminent biographer of Picasso who died in March 2019. The exhibition Picasso’s Women: Fernande to Jacqueline, features paintings and sculptures showing the central role and influence of the many women in Picasso’s life.

The exhibition runs until 22 June 2019 at Gagosian, 980 Madison Avenue, New York. Richardson had previously organized six major exhibitions of Picasso’s work at Gagosian. In the early 1960s, John Richardson was planning to write a study of Picasso’s portraits and spent hours with the artist, poring over reproductions of his works. As Picasso spoke about the complexities of his pictorial thinking—pointing out, for example, that a portrait of Dora Maar might also contain elements referring to her romantic predecessor Marie-Thérèse Walter, and her successor Françoise Gilot—Richardson began to believe that a detailed biographical treatment of Picasso’s portraiture would close a notable gap in Picasso scholarship. Decades later he would sit down to write what would become the monumental multivolume biography, A Life of Picasso.

Picasso was as eclectic in his choice of muse as he was in style: the bohemian Fernande Olivier; disciplined Olga Khokhlova; blonde Venus Marie-Thérèse; passionate artists Dora and Françoise; Sylvette David, the young woman with a high ponytail; and Jacqueline Roque, the devoted, romantic beauty. Not merely mute muses, Fernande and Françoise published memoirs; Olga and Marie-Thérèse kept extensive archives of photographs and letters over decades; Dora gave interviews to researchers and documented Picasso’s work and private life in photographs.

Opens Today: The Young Picasso, Blue and Rose Periods, Fondation Beyeler, Basel, until 26 May 2019

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PABLO PICASSO, FAMILLE DE SALTIMBANQUES AVEC UN SINGE, 1905
Gouache, watercolour and ink on cardboard, 104 x 75 cm
Göteborg Konstmuseum, Purchase 1922
© Succession Picasso / 2018, ProLitteris, Zurich
Photo: © Göteborg Konstmuseum

In 2019, as an exceptional cultural highlight, the Fondation Beyeler is mounting a unique exhibition devoted to Pablo Picasso’s masterpieces of his early Blue and Rose periods. This will be the most comprehensive presentation ever seen in Europe of Picasso’s paintings and sculptures from 1901 to 1906, each one of which is a milestone on the road to recognition as the twentieth century’s paramount artist. Picasso’s pictures from this period are counted among the most beautiful examples of modern art and are certainly some of the most valuable art works anywhere in the world.

At the age of just twenty, the aspiring genius Picasso (1881 – 1973) was already engaged in a restless search for new themes and forms of expression, which he immediately brought to perfection. One artistic revolution followed another, in a rapid succession of changing styles and visual worlds. The forthcoming exhibition at the Fondation Beyeler places the focus on the Blue and Rose periods, and thus on a central phase in Picasso’s work. It also sheds fresh light on the emergence, from 1907 onward, of Cubism, as an epochal new movement that was nevertheless rooted in the art of the preceding period.

In these poignant and magical works, realized in Spain and France, Picasso – the artist of the century – creates images that have a universal evocative power. Matters of existential significance, such as life, love, sexuality, fate, and death, find their embodiment in the delicate beauty of young women and men, but also in depictions of children and old people who carry within them happiness and joy, accompanied by sadness.

The exhibition features around 75 masterpieces on loan from major museums and private collections worldwide. In a multimedia space, fascinating and interactive books and a film allow visitors to immerse themselves in the young artist’s life and work.

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Featured exhibition: Picasso, Braque, Gris, Blanchard, Miró y Dalí. Grandes Figuras de la Vanguardia, Museo de Bellas Artes de Asturias, Oviedo, until 6 January 2019

The exhibition Picasso, Braque, Gris, Blanchard, Miró y Dalí. Grandes Figuras de la Vanguardia will showcase eight works from the Colección Masaveu and the Colección Pedro Masaveu. All these works were collected by the Masaveu family, a Catalan dynasty of entrepreneurs and philanthropists who settled in Asturias in 1840. The exhibition is the result of a collaboration between the Museo de Bellas Artes de Asturias, the Fundación María Cristina Masaveu Peterson and the Corporación Masaveu. It has been curated by Alfonso Palacio, the director of the Museo de Bellas Artes de Asturias. A 17-page leaflet guide to the exhibition can be downloaded by clicking here.

Click here for more information on this exhibition.

Opens today: Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy at Tate Modern, London

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Pablo Picasso The Dream (Le Rêve) 1932, Private Collection © Succession Picasso/DACS, London 2017

Co-organised by Tate Modern and the Musée Picasso, Paris, the exhibition Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy at Tate Modern chronicles an intensely creative year in the life of this artist. Focusing on representing his lover Marie-Thérèse Walter, he produced some of his most innovative compositions.
Surprisingly, this will be the Tate’s first ever solo exhibition dedicated to Picasso. Featuring paintings, drawings, and archive documents, the exhibition will reveal the man behind the myth, allowing visitors to discover the full complexity of this famous artist and of his exceptional life.

Picasso portrait to lead Sotheby’s Impressionist and Modern Art Evening Sale, 28 February 2018

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Pablo Picasso, Femme au béret et à la robe quadrillée (marie-Thérèse Walter), 1937 © SUCCESSION PICASSO/DACS 2018. 

Pablo Picasso’s Femme au béret et à la robe quadrillée (Marie-Thérèse Walter) (1937) will be the star of Sotheby’s evening sale tomorrow. It is one of Picasso’s last paintings of his muse Marie-Thérèse Walter, whom he represented countless times in the 1930s. Several paintings of Marie-Thérèse will feature in the exhibition Picasso 1932: Love, Fame, Tragedy, opening on 8 March 2018 at Tate Modern, London. While works in the exhibition chronicle the romantic highpoint of their relationship, the painting auctioned by Sotheby’s marks its end. Indeed, the dark shadow surrounding Marie-Thérèse’s face may evoke Picasso’s growing passion for Dora Maar, his lover between 1935 and 1943.