Tag Archives: Dallas

Opens today: ‘Zurbarán: Jacob and his Twelve Sons, Paintings from Auckland Castle’

 

de Zurbaran, Francisco, 1598-1664; Levi III

Levi from the Auckland Castle Series

Zurbarán: Jacob and his Twelve Sons, Paintings from Auckland Castle, Meadows Museum, Dallas, USA, September 17, 2017 – January 7, 2018 

Francisco de Zurbarán was born in Fuente de Cantos, in Western Spain, but spent most of his working life in Seville. Like Ribera, Zurbarán is also considered a Caravaggista (a follower of the Italian painter Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio, active 1571-1610) particularly for his exceptional use of chiaroscuro.

These 13 paintings (12 by Zurbarán and one a direct copy of the work by Zurbarán) are a visual narrative of Jacob’s deathbed act of bestowing a blessing on each son, foretelling their destinies and those of their tribes. Although each painting holds its own as an exceptional portrait, seeing the works together provides a unique experience for viewers, transporting them across history to make them a witness to that moment. At the Meadows, the paintings will be displayed together in one gallery.

It is not known who originally commissioned the series, but they were auctioned from the collection of a Jewish merchant named Benjamin Mendez in 1756. Richard Trevor, Bishop of Durham, acquired the paintings for Auckland Castle, seeing in the public presentation of these works an opportunity to make a statement about the need for social, political and religious understanding and tolerance between Christians and Jews in Great Britain.

While in the USA, the paintings will also undergo in-depth technical study for the first time at the Kimbell Art Museum. This will include the use of infrared reflectography, ultra-violet light, x-radiography and pigment analysis. The goals of this work are twofold: first, to gain a better understanding of Zurbarán’s artistic process by exploring this unique series of related works; and second, to identify any additional needs for their ongoing conservation and care after they return to the U.K.

Accompanying the exhibition and conservation research will be an illustrated catalogue containing scholarly essays exploring the series from various historical, religious and artistic perspectives. Dr. Mark A. Roglán, Director, Meadows Museum, is the scientific director of the project and has helped to gather contributions by Claire Barry, Director of Conservation, Kimbell Art Museum; Professor John Barton, Oriel and Laing Professor of the Interpretation of Holy Scripture, Emeritus at Oxford University; Dr. Jonathan Brown, Carroll and Milton Petrie Professor of Fine Arts at New York University; Dr. Christopher Ferguson, Curatorial, Conservation and Exhibitions Director, Auckland Castle; Dr. Susan Grace Galassi, Senior Curator, The Frick Collection; Akemi Herráez Vossbrink, PhD Candidate at the University of Cambridge; Alexandra Letvin, PhD Candidate at Johns Hopkins University; and Dr. Edward Payne, Senior Curator, Spanish Art, Auckland Castle. This exhibition and study have been co- organized by the Meadows Museum, SMU; The Frick Collection; and Auckland Castle; in association with the Kimbell Art Museum. A generous gift from The Meadows Foundation has made this exhibition and study possible, with additional support from the Centro de Estudios Europa Hispánica and the Center for Spain in America.

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Featured Exhibition: Picasso/Rivera: Still Life and the Precedence of Form

mm-70-1000pxPicasso/Rivera: Still Life and the Precedence of Form, Meadows Museum, Dallas, USA, until  5 November

This focused exhibition of paintings is inspired by a work in the Meadows Museum’s collection, Picasso’s Still Life in a Landscape (1915). In the early 20th century, Picasso and the Mexican artist Diego Rivera both lived and worked in Paris. Initially friends, in 1915 they fell out because Diego Rivera accused Picasso of plagiarising the foliage from one of his own paintings.

The source of Rivera’s ire was the perceived semblance between his 1915 Zapatista Landscape (The Guerrilla) and Picasso’s Seated Man (1915-16), which in its first iteration – as seen by Rivera in another visit to Picasso’s studio in August 1915 – was known as Man Seated in Shrubbery. Rivera noted acute similarities between his canvas and that of the early state of Picasso’s work; namely, both works featured a similarly structured still life set outdoors. The Mexican artist’s very specific complaint was his former mentor’s liberal borrowing of Rivera’s formulaic foliage – scumbled patches of green and white paint on a dark ground.

Picasso/Rivera: Still Life and the Precedence of Form takes as its point of departure another case study of the two artists’ works: Picasso’s Still Life in a Landscape (1915) at the Meadows, which will be displayed for the first time with Rivera’s Still Life with Gray Bowl (Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidential Library, Austin), painted in the same year. Exhibited in close proximity, these two paintings together encapsulate the two artists’ overlapping of themes and motif appropriation during that period.

Picasso/Rivera: Still Life and the Precedence of Form affords a closer look at the development of Picasso’s Still Life in a Landscape in the Meadows collection by presenting it together with its analogue from the Columbus Museum of Art as well as Rivera’s variation on the theme from Austin. The visual dialogue taking place in 1915 between these two giants of modern art will be further outlined through the display of Rivera’s 1915 Still Life with Bread Knife, a second generous loan from the Columbus Museum of Art. Beyond the rich anecdotes regarding the relationship of the two artists, this group of paintings provides an opportunity to find parallels as well as deviations between these canvases. In spite of limited wartime resources, 1914-15 proved to be a fecund era of creativity for both Picasso and Rivera.

Modern Spanish Art at the Meadows Museum

2016-06-Modern-Spanish-Art-from-the-ACAC-Dallas-upcoming
Modern Spanish Art from the Asociación Colección Arte Contemporáneo

Meadows Museum, Dallas, TX

9 October 2016 – 19 January 2017

 

Modern Spanish Art from the Asociación Colección Arte Contemporáneo is the first exhibition in America to present a comprehensive survey of Modern Art in Spain from the Belle Époque through the Kennedy years. The rich and diverse art created in Spain during this period is largely unknown in the U.S. due to the turmoil that took place in Spain at this time. Juxtaposing the modern art collection of the Meadows Museum with works from the Asociación Colección Arte Contemporáneo (ACAC) in the Museo Patio Herreriano of Valladolid, this exhibition brings together more than 90 paintings, sculptures and works on paper to demonstrate the most important aspects of Spanish modern art and shed light on the global connection between Spanish art and other international modern art movements.

Exhibition: Dalí, Meadows Museum

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Salvador Dalí: L’homme poisson (1930)

Salvador Dalí, An Early Surrealist Masterpiece
Meadows Museum, Dallas, Texas

Exhibition closes: 7 August 2016

The 1930s were one of the most creatively fruitful decades of Salvador Dalí’s career. L’homme poisson (The Fish Man) shows both his tremendous imagination as well as his technical adroitness, and offers a revealing glimpse into the artist’s inner psyche. After an auspicious beginning as part of the first exhibition of surrealist works held in the U.S., in 1931, the painting has remained out of the public domain for much of its existence. This exhibition celebrates the Meadows’ acquisition of L’homme poisson—the first painting by Dalí to enter the collection of a Texas museum—and presents a renewed look at this early masterpiece within the artist’s oeuvre of surrealism.

Meadows Museum: Online Collections

2016-Meadows-Velasquez

Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez: Portrait of Queen Mariana

Meadows Museum
Southern Methodist University
Dallas, Texas

The entire collection of the Meadows Museum, which has notable holdings of Spanish art, has just been digitised and is available online for browsing and searches.

Murillo to Goya, Dallas and Madrid

2014-06-Murillo-Meadows-HamburgThe Spanish Gesture: Drawings from Murillo to Goya from the Hamburger Kunsthalle, Meadows Museum, Dallas, Texas, May 25-August 31, 2014.
The Kunsthalle of Hamburg holds one of the most significant collections of Spanish drawings found outside of Spain, containing works by Alonso Cano, Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, Juan de Valdés Leal and Francisco de Goya y Lucientes, among others. This is the first exhibition to present the collection on a large scale, 123 years after they were purchased. As part of the continued collaboration between the Meadows Museum and the Prado, the jointly organized exhibition will present around 80 drawings, first in Dallas, then at the Prado, Madrid.