Tag Archives: Salvador Dalí

Closing soon: Dalí’s Aliyah: A Moment in Jewish History, Meadows Museum, Dallas, until 13 January 2019

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Salvador Dalí, The Land Come to Life: “The mountains and the hills shall break forth before you into singing and all the trees of the field shall clap their hands” (Isaiah 55.12), © 2018 Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Artists Rights Society. Photo by Kevin Todora

In 1966, Samuel Shore, head of Shorewood Publishers in New York, commissioned Salvador Dalí (1904–1989) to commemorate the twentieth anniversary of the founding of the State of Israel in 1948. Such a commission was not uncommon for the artist. In fact, from approximately 1965 to 1979, the artist’s output was largely comprised of painted works on paper, completed on commission and made expressly for production as limited-edition prints. 

The Shore commission was for a series of twenty-five paintings depicting the renewal of the Jewish people. Dalí completed his mixed media paintings in gouache, watercolour, and Indian ink on paper; the paintings were then reproduced as lithographs and published in a limited edition of 250 sets of twenty-five lithographs each. Dalí took inspiration from both the Hebrew Bible as well as contemporary history to address a variety of subject matter related to Jewish history and diaspora, spanning the course of over 2,000 years. Titled Aliyah, a Hebrew word that literally means ‘migration to the land of Israel’, the series was completed in 1968 in time for the celebration of Israeli Independence Day on April 3. Following their exhibition in 1968 the paintings and prints were offered for sale and dispersed; there are only a handful of complete sets known today. This rare complete set is shown for the first time since its acquisition by the Meadows Museum in 2017.

The set was generously given to the Museum by Linda P. and William A. Custard in celebration of Meadows Museum advisory council member Janet Pollman Kafka, and her twentieth year as Honorary Consul of Spain in Dallas. 

Featured Exhibition: Gala Salvador Dalí: A Room of One’s Own in Púbol, Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya, Barcelona, until 14 October

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Salvador Dalí. Gala Placidia. Galatea of the Spheres, 1952. Fundació Gala- Salvador Dalí, Figueres © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, VEGAP, Barcelona, 2018

Gala (7th September 1894 – 10th June 1982), born into a family of intellectuals from Kazan (Russia), spent her childhood in Moscow before moving to Switzerland and then Paris. There she befriended such prominent members of the surrealist movement as Max Ernst. In 1929 she travelled to Cadaqués, where she met Dalí. The two fell in love and started to live together, first during an eight-year exile in the United States and then in Portlligat, New York and Paris.

Gala, an enigmatic and intuitive lady famous as Salvador Dalí’s wife, muse and model, is the subject of this exhibition. Abandoning traditional stereotypes on the role of this figure, the show follows her transformation into a fully-fledged artist, exploring her artistic cooperation with Dalí and revealing the possible shared authorship of some works.

Click here for more information.

News from the world of Hispanic art

Many things happened last week in the world of Spanish and Latin American visual culture.

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The Prado’s Jeronimos Wing. Photo by Luis García on Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA 3.0.

London’s Sir John Soane Museum announced a new series of annual lectures and prizes intended to raise the profile of architects, artists and writers who broadened society’s understanding of architecture and the built environment. The inaugural lecture, scheduled for November 1 at the Royal Institution in London, will be delivered by Rafael Moneo, designer of the Prado’s Jeronimos Extension, which opened in 2007. As reported by The Art Newspaper, Moneo will be awarded the Soane Medal, a copy of the medal presented in 1835 to Sir John Soane by “the Architects of England”, in recognition of his “essential services to architecture”.

 

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Francis Bacon, Triptych, 1991, oil on linen, 198.1 x 147.6 cm, MOMA Museum, New York. Credit: William A. M. Burden Fund and Nelson A. Rockefeller Bequest Fund (both by exchange); © 2017 Estate of Francis Bacon/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/DACS, London.

On 21 July The Art Newspaper reported that Spanish Police recovered three paintings by Francis Bacon stolen from the private collection of Bacon’s acquaintance José Capelo in Madrid in 2015. A tip-off from the Art Loss Register enabled the recovery, which follows the arrest of ten people associated with the robbery in the past two years. Bacon portrayed Capelo in a work of 1987 now owned by the Swiss Galerie Gmurzynska and in one of his last paintings, the 1991 Triptych now at the MOMA.

 

 

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Lygia Pape, installation shot of Ttéia I, C, 2002, at the 53rd Biennal of Venice. Jean-Pierre Dalbéra on Flickr.

A less positive news comes from US District Court for the Southern District of New York. The daughter of Brazilian artist Lygia Pape, whose monographic exhibition A Multitude of Forms closed yesterday at Met Breuer, has sued LG Electronics, several retailers and Getty Images Korea for copyright infringement. According to the complainants, LG Electronics approached the Pape estate (Projeto Lygia Pape) to license her work Ttéia (2003), which they wished to use as default wallpaper and packaging for their new phone K20 V. Pape’s estate refused LG’s request, citing the artist’s life-long resistance to the commercialisation of her work. Nevertheless, LG persevered in their use of the image, using a too-close unauthorized derivation of the work on the phone’s wallpaper and packaging. As a result, Pape’s daughter has asked the Court to recall the packaging, advertising, and other materials that contain the infringing image, including the phone itself if necessary. As noted by the plantiffs’ lawyer John Cahill, ‘This is an extreme, perhaps unique, case in which a multinational corporation—fully aware that it was doing wrong—abused a work of fine art in the service of the profit motive.’ A positive resolution of the case may ensure better protection for artists’ rights in the future.

 

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Salvador Dalí in 1965. Roger Higgins, Library of Congress, New York World-Telegram & Sun Collection. Wikimedia Commons.

To end on a lighter note, Dalí’s famously exuberant mustache is still in perfect shape, almost 30 years after the artist’s passing. The information was reported by Narcís Bardalet, the embalmer who took care of the Surrealist’s body after his death in 1989, following the exhumation of Dalí’s corpse last week. Ordered by a Spanish Court, the exhumation will enable a DNA examination to determine whether María Pilar Abel Martínez is an illegitimate daughter of the artist, as she claims since 2007.

 

Teatro-Museo Dalí Exhibition

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De sueños, paseos nocturnos y vivencias. Dalí in Madrid
Teatro-Museo Dalí, Figueras, Gerona
10 May – 16 October 2016

23 works mainly watercolours and drawings created when Dalí lived as a student in Madrid,1922-926. Amongst the items shown is the watercolour of Salvador Dalí and Maruja Mallo in the Café de Oriente of 1923.

CLosing soon: Salvador Dalí at the Menil (Houston)

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The Secret of the Hanging Egg: Salvador Dalí at the Menil
Menil Collection, Houston, Texas

Exhibition  closes 19 June 2016

The Menil has borrowed from the Dali Museum, St Petersburg, Florida Dalí’s Eggs on a Plate without the Plate and displayed it alongside its own Surrealist collection including artists with whom he collaborated in Paris.

Click here for a 2-page leaflet on the painting

Exhibition: Dalí, Meadows Museum

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Salvador Dalí: L’homme poisson (1930)

Salvador Dalí, An Early Surrealist Masterpiece
Meadows Museum, Dallas, Texas

Exhibition closes: 7 August 2016

The 1930s were one of the most creatively fruitful decades of Salvador Dalí’s career. L’homme poisson (The Fish Man) shows both his tremendous imagination as well as his technical adroitness, and offers a revealing glimpse into the artist’s inner psyche. After an auspicious beginning as part of the first exhibition of surrealist works held in the U.S., in 1931, the painting has remained out of the public domain for much of its existence. This exhibition celebrates the Meadows’ acquisition of L’homme poisson—the first painting by Dalí to enter the collection of a Texas museum—and presents a renewed look at this early masterpiece within the artist’s oeuvre of surrealism.

Dalí by Robert Descharnes (Dalí Museum)

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Dalí Revealed: Candid Moments from the Artist’s Life

Photographs by Robert Descharnes (1926-2014).

Dalí Museum, St. Petersburg, Florida

On view until Spring 2016

The photographer made the acquaintance of the Surrealist artist in 1950, while they were both traveling to the United States.