Tag Archives: Prado Museum

Celebrating the Prado: A Day of Special Events at the National Gallery, London, 30 September 2019

The National Gallery will celebrate the 200th anniversary of Spain’s foremost artistic institution, the Museo del Prado in Madrid, with a day of special events. Read below or click here to discover what’s on.

In conversation: Celebrating 200 years of the Prado

Lunchtime talk, Sainsbury Wing Theatre, National Gallery, London, Monday 30 September 2019, 1–1.45pm

Miguel Falomir © Archivo Fotográfico. Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid

Discover Madrid’s Prado Museum: past, present and future. Miguel Falomir, Director of the Prado Museum, Madrid, joins Gabriele Finaldi, Director of the National Gallery, to discuss the history and dynamic future of Spain’s most eminent art museum, which celebrates its bicentenary this year.

Click here for more information.

Picasso and the Prado

Lunchtime talk, Sainsbury Wing Theatre, National Gallery, London, Monday 30 September 2019, 2–2.45pm

Pablo Picasso in Antibes, Summer 1946

The Prado Museum in Madrid held a special place in Picasso’s heart and mind. As a young artist he visited the museum many times, drawn to the world of El Greco and Velázquez. Later, in 1936, the Spanish Republic awarded him the title of Honorary Director-in-Exile of the Prado Museum in gratitude for his support. In 1957 he created a series of 58 variations of Velázquez’s ‘Las Meninas’, the iconic work in the Prado. Art historian Gijs van Hensbergen tells the story of Picasso’s life-long relationship with the Prado.

Click here for more information.

Black and light: Discover the mystique of the Prado Museum by night

Film Screening and Q&A, Sainsbury Wing Theatre, National Gallery, London, Monday 30 September 2019, 3–5.20pm

© 2017- Alvaro Perdices

Join award-winning film-maker Álvaro Perdices for a screening of his stunning 2015 film ‘Negro y Luz’, an artistic essay on darkness and light exploring the Prado Museum at night.

3 pm Introduction to the film with Álvaro Pedrices
3.10 pm Film showing of Negro y Luz (2015)
5.30 pm Q&A with Álvaro Perdices
5.40 pm Close

Click here for more information.

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ARTES Glendinning Lecture: Javier Barón, ‘Two Masters of the Prado: Velázquez, El Greco and Modern Painting’, Instituto Cervantes, London, 27 February 2019

Screenshot 2019-02-01 at 13.31.04This year’s Glendinning Lecture, an annual event in honour of the great Hispanist Nigel Glendinning, will celebrate the 200th anniversary of the Museo Nacional del Prado.

Dr Javier Barón will deliver a lecture on how Velázquez and El Greco influenced modern painting.

From its opening in 1819, the Prado offered artists a unique opportunity to study the oeuvre of Spanish Old Masters, especially Murillo, Velázquez and El Greco. This was, precisely, the chronological order in which these masters influenced foreign painters.

During the nineteenth century, Velázquez was the most appreciated Spanish master. The Prado owned the most extensive collection of this artist in the world. So, many painters, amongst them Wilkie, Courbet, Manet, Renoir, Sargent, Chase and others came to Madrid to see his masterworks. Velázquez’s approach to everyday life, as well as his large and loose brushstrokes, were relevant to naturalistic painters.

El Greco was especially appreciated after the first monographic exhibition of his work took place at the Prado in 1902. His influence was already important in the mainstream renewal of painting spearheaded by Pablo Picasso and cubism in Paris. At the same time, El Greco was the major reference for Central European Expressionism. American artists also appreciated the suggestiveness of his painting when seeking to lay the foundation of their own modernity.

Javier Barón is Doctor in History of Art by the University of Oviedo, where he was graduated with honours back in 1989. Before joining Prado Museum, he was a professor of Art History at the University of Oviedo (1991–2002). In 2003, Barón was appointed as Head of Nineteenth-century Painting Department at the Prado Museum, a position he held until 2014, when he became Senior Curator. He is correspondent member of the Spanish Royal Academy of History, the Spanish Royal Academy of Fine Arts and the Royal Academy of Fine Arts of San Telmo, in Málaga, as well as member of the Royal Institute of Asturian Studies, Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres, member of the Board of Trustees of the Sorolla Museum and Member of the Madrid City Council Board of Valuation of Works of Art.

Free and open to all, but please book a ticket here.

News: The Centre for Spain in America will sponsor a New Fellowship at the Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts

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Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, Fray Julián of Alcalá’s Vision of the Ascension of the Soul of King Philip II of Spain, 1645-46, Clark Art Institute

The Clark Art Institute’s Research and Academic Programme recently received a $150,000 grant from the Center for Spain in America that provides funds to host a series of fellowships over the next three to six years to encourage the study of Spanish art. The first fellowship, available for the 2018–19 academic year, is open to candidates from all nations.

The Center for Spain in America (CSA) promotes advanced study and public awareness of Spanish art and visual culture in the United States, also focusing on the history of Spanish presence and the influence of Spanish art and culture on North America. CSA cooperates with universities, libraries, archives, museums, and other educational or cultural institutions fostering academic excellence in the field of Spanish studies in the United States and supporting activities such as symposia, lecture series, exhibitions, and publications.

The CSA Fellowship at the Clark will focus on the study of all aspects of Spanish art from the early medieval period to the beginning of the twentieth century, and on the worldwide impact of Spanish art and artists. The programme is open to scholars or museum professionals researching individual Spanish artists or specific works of art; pursuing projects that include particular periods, geographic regions, subjects, or themes in Spanish art; studying the collecting and connoisseurship of Spanish art, particularly in the Americas; and examining the influence and importance of Spanish art and its reception throughout the world. It is anticipated that CSA Fellows may undertake publishing projects and/or exhibition research activities during their tenure at the Clark.

The Center for Spain in America is affiliated with the Madrid-based Centro de Estudios Europa Hispánica. José Luis Colomer, a noted scholar of Spanish art, directs both organizations and has worked closely with Olivier Meslay, Felda and Dena Hardymon Director of the Clark, to establish the new programme.

The CSA Fellowship underscores the Clark’s international initiatives. Over the last decade, the Research and Academic Programme has hosted a number of leading Spanish scholars as fellows, including several curators from the Museo del Prado, Madrid. The Clark and the Prado have also forged a strong collaborative curatorial relationship. In 2010, the Clark lent its entire collection of works by Pierre-Auguste Renoir to the Prado for the highly successful exhibition Pasión por Renoir. In 2016, the Prado reciprocated by lending many of its finest works to the Clark for the exhibition Splendor, Myth, and Vision: Nudes from the Prado.

ARTES will post more information on the fellowship as it becomes available.

News from the world of Hispanic art

Many things happened last week in the world of Spanish and Latin American visual culture.

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The Prado’s Jeronimos Wing. Photo by Luis García on Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA 3.0.

London’s Sir John Soane Museum announced a new series of annual lectures and prizes intended to raise the profile of architects, artists and writers who broadened society’s understanding of architecture and the built environment. The inaugural lecture, scheduled for November 1 at the Royal Institution in London, will be delivered by Rafael Moneo, designer of the Prado’s Jeronimos Extension, which opened in 2007. As reported by The Art Newspaper, Moneo will be awarded the Soane Medal, a copy of the medal presented in 1835 to Sir John Soane by “the Architects of England”, in recognition of his “essential services to architecture”.

 

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Francis Bacon, Triptych, 1991, oil on linen, 198.1 x 147.6 cm, MOMA Museum, New York. Credit: William A. M. Burden Fund and Nelson A. Rockefeller Bequest Fund (both by exchange); © 2017 Estate of Francis Bacon/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/DACS, London.

On 21 July The Art Newspaper reported that Spanish Police recovered three paintings by Francis Bacon stolen from the private collection of Bacon’s acquaintance José Capelo in Madrid in 2015. A tip-off from the Art Loss Register enabled the recovery, which follows the arrest of ten people associated with the robbery in the past two years. Bacon portrayed Capelo in a work of 1987 now owned by the Swiss Galerie Gmurzynska and in one of his last paintings, the 1991 Triptych now at the MOMA.

 

 

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Lygia Pape, installation shot of Ttéia I, C, 2002, at the 53rd Biennal of Venice. Jean-Pierre Dalbéra on Flickr.

A less positive news comes from US District Court for the Southern District of New York. The daughter of Brazilian artist Lygia Pape, whose monographic exhibition A Multitude of Forms closed yesterday at Met Breuer, has sued LG Electronics, several retailers and Getty Images Korea for copyright infringement. According to the complainants, LG Electronics approached the Pape estate (Projeto Lygia Pape) to license her work Ttéia (2003), which they wished to use as default wallpaper and packaging for their new phone K20 V. Pape’s estate refused LG’s request, citing the artist’s life-long resistance to the commercialisation of her work. Nevertheless, LG persevered in their use of the image, using a too-close unauthorized derivation of the work on the phone’s wallpaper and packaging. As a result, Pape’s daughter has asked the Court to recall the packaging, advertising, and other materials that contain the infringing image, including the phone itself if necessary. As noted by the plantiffs’ lawyer John Cahill, ‘This is an extreme, perhaps unique, case in which a multinational corporation—fully aware that it was doing wrong—abused a work of fine art in the service of the profit motive.’ A positive resolution of the case may ensure better protection for artists’ rights in the future.

 

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Salvador Dalí in 1965. Roger Higgins, Library of Congress, New York World-Telegram & Sun Collection. Wikimedia Commons.

To end on a lighter note, Dalí’s famously exuberant mustache is still in perfect shape, almost 30 years after the artist’s passing. The information was reported by Narcís Bardalet, the embalmer who took care of the Surrealist’s body after his death in 1989, following the exhumation of Dalí’s corpse last week. Ordered by a Spanish Court, the exhumation will enable a DNA examination to determine whether María Pilar Abel Martínez is an illegitimate daughter of the artist, as she claims since 2007.

 

Velázquez Portrait of Philip III (Prado)

Velázquez: Portrait of Philip III

Museo Nacional del Prado, Room 24
Villanueva Building, Room 24

6 June – 29 October 2017

On display for the first time in the Museum’s galleries is the Portrait of Philip III by Velázquez, a work donated by William B. Jordan to the American Friends of the Prado Museum, which has ceded it to the Museum as a long-term deposit.

Velázquez’s painting is displayed alongside the Prado’s Philip II offering the Infante don Fernando to Victory by Titian, which has very recently been restored (with the support of Fundación Iberdrola España). In the 17th century Titian’s painting hung in the same room (the Salón Nuevo in the Alcázar in Madrid) as The Expulsion of the Moriscos by Velázquez, a painting directly connected with the newly acquired portrait of Philip III, which was executed as a study for it.

This donation and long-term deposit with the Prado will assist in completing the Museum’s presentation of Velázquez as a court portraitist. A work previously unknown to scholars, it casts new light on one of the key paintings produced by the artist during his early years at court: The Expulsion of the Moriscos.

Also on temporary display are Philip III by Pedro Vidal; and Philip IV in Armour and The Infante don Carlos, both by Velázquez, thus creating a context for understanding the Philip III portrait and the reasons for its attribution to Velázquez (stylistic analysis, technical characteristics, and its relationship to The Expulsion of the Moriscos).

The Portrait of Philip III is a previously unpublished work with stylistic features and technical characteristics that allow it to be attributed to Velázquez and to be associated with The Expulsion of the Moriscos, a work painted in 1627 in competition with Vicente Carducho, Eugenio Cajés and Angelo Nardi. It was lost in the Royal Alcázar (Madrid) fire of 1734, but descriptions of it survive confirming that the principal figure depicted in it was Philip III, shown standing next to an allegory of Spain and pointing towards the Moriscos as they were being expelled. Velázquez never met Philip III, who died in 1621, and he based his work on portraits of the monarch by other artists. This canvas is a preliminary study that he used to establish an image of the King, thus explaining its sketchy nature as a working tool rather than an independent, finished work.

The recent restoration of Titian’s Philip II offering the Infante don Ferdinand to Victory, has recovered the qualities of Titian’s original, but has also made Carducho’s enlargements more visible. This is particularly evident in the architectural elements; and in the inferior quality blue pigments that Carducho used, resulting in a different aging process and making his modifications visible. Following the current display, the canvas will be shown with Carducho’s additions concealed.

Applications deadline, 18 March 2016: EEHAR-CSIC / Museo Nacional del Prado

Abierta la convocatoria de ayudas EEHAR-CSIC / Museo Nacional del Prado

EEHAR-CSIC / Museo Nacional del Prado

Deadline: Friday, 18 March 2016!

La Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología en Roma-CSIC y el Museo Nacional del Prado comienzan una colaboración científica para promover iniciativas dirigidas a jóvenes investigadores en los campos de la Historia, la Historia del Arte y las Ciencias Humanas. La primera de ellas es la organización de un Taller dedicado a las Geografías de la pintura barroca, un encuentro entre especialistas de este campo y jóvenes investigadores que tendrá lugar en la Escuela Española de Historia y Arqueología en Roma entre los días 10 y 12 de mayo de 2016.
For more information, click here.

Exhibition closing soon! The Divine Morales (Prado, Madrid; Bilbao; Barcelona)

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El Divino Morales

Museo del Prado, Madrid

Exhibition closed 10 January 2016

Moves to:

Museo de Bellas Artes de Bilbao, 9 February – 16 May

Museu Nacional d’Art Catalunya, Barcelona, 16/06-16/09 2016.

Nineteen works owned by the Prado, including the Christ on the Cross and the Resurrection gifted by Plácido Arango, plus 35 from national and international museums, private collectors and religious institutions. Works include the Virgin with the Little Bird from the parish church of San Agustín in Madrid, the Virgin and Child with the Infant Saint John from the New Cathedral in Salamanca and the Ecce Homo from the Museu Nacional de Arte Antiga in Lisbon, which was recently restored in the Prado workshops.

Catalogue: 272 pages, 26,60 €