Tag Archives: Meadows Museum

Madrid’s Palacio de Liria to Become a Museum

Francisco de Goya y Lucientes (Spanish, 1746-1828), The Duchess of Alba in White, 1795. Oil on canvas. Colección Duques de Alba


As reported by El País and other Spanish newspapers, the Liria Palace, residence of the Dukes of Alba and home to Spain’s most important private collection, is being transformed into a museum and will soon open to the public every day of the week.

Touring from Madrid to Dallas, the recent exhibition Treasures from the House of Alba: 500 Years of Art and Collecting (Meadows Museum, 2015–16) has familiarised the public with masterpieces from this unparalleled collection. Yet the opening of a museum in the Liria Palace will allow visitors to experience the artworks in the spaces for which they were commissioned and collected.

Unlike such nearby collections as the Cerralbo o Lázaro Galdiano, the palace will continue to function as a residence. Works will be displayed according to the wishes of the last duchess of Alba, Cayetana Fitz-James Stuart y de Silva (1926–2014), who oversaw the partial opening of the palace to the public in 1975.

The museum’s opening date has not yet been announced.

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CSA Curatorial Fellowship at the Meadows Museum, Dallas

The Meadows Museum, SMU, Dallas, has announced that the Center for Spain in America (CSA) will support the museum’s pre-doctoral curatorial fellowship for 2019–2020. Established in 2011, the pre-doctoral fellowship provides an intensive scholarly, professional experience with the opportunity to research Spanish art at the Meadows and other national and international institutions.

CSA will also underwrite the catalog for the forthcoming exhibition Alonso Berruguete: First Sculptor of Renaissance Spain (National Gallery of Art, October 13, 2019–February 17, 2020; Meadows Museum, March 29–July 26, 2020). It will be the first general book on Berruguete published in English.

The New York-based CSA fosters the study of Spanish history, art and literature by creating and funding doctoral fellowships at European and American universities, as well as research centers with archival and bibliographical material relevant to the field of Hispanism. The Center and its Spanish counterpart, Centro de Estudios Europa Hispánica (CEEH), have collaborated with the Meadows Museum on several projects prior to this announcement, including the exhibition and catalog for The Lost Manuscripts from the Sistine Chapel: An Epic Journey from Rome to Toledo (2011); the exhibition and catalog for The Spanish Gesture: Drawings From Murillo to Goya in the Hamburger Kunsthalle (2014); Sorolla in America: Friends and Patrons (2015), a study of the major collectors of Sorolla’s work; and the catalog for Zurbarán: Jacob and His Twelve Sons, Paintings from Auckland Castle.

Students wishing to apply for the CSA Curatorial Fellowship can find more information on the Meadows Museum’s website.

Opens Today: Fortuny: Friends and Followers, Meadows Museum, Dallas, until June 2, 2019

Mariano-Fortuny-The-Choice-of-a-Model

Mariano Fortuny y Marsal (Spanish, 1838–1874), The Choice of a Model, 1868–74. Oil on wood. National Gallery of Art, Washington. Corcoran Collection (William A. Clark Collection), 2015.143.12.

A painting by Mariano Fortuny y Marsal (1838–1874), The Choice of a Model (1868–74), is on long-term loan from the National Gallery of Art, DC, to the Meadows Museum. In honor of this prestigious loan, the Museum will host an exhibition dedicated to Fortuny and his world, drawing from its rich holdings of works on paper as well as key loans from private and public collections, including the Dallas Museum of Art and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, in order to showcase many of the friends, family, and followers who engaged with the popular Spanish painter’s work. Fortuny’s paintings were especially prized by nineteenth-century American collectors as well as by contemporaneous artists. The legacy of that popularity resonates with the distinctly American provenance of both the Meadows’s Beach at Portici and the National Gallery’s The Choice of a Model, and their current ownership by American museums.

 

Though today Fortuny is lesser known outside the country of his birth, the Spanish painter was extremely popular in both Europe and the United States during his lifetime and well into the early twentieth century. Imitators of his characteristically proto-Impressionist, painterly style and eclectic, “exotic” genre scenes were so plentiful that their style came to be described with its very own “ism”: “Fortunismo” (Fortuny-ism). Fortuny: Friends and Followers explores that legacy by bringing together a diverse group of artists, including the important French artists Jean-Léon Gérôme (1824–1904), James Tissot (1836–1902), Jean Louis Ernest Meissonier (1815– 1891). Fortuny’s sphere of influence is explored through a variety of themes including intimate representations of family and home, trends of modern life in European cosmopolitan centers like Paris and Venice, cultural arts from Spain and beyond, and much more.

Click here for more information.

Closing soon: Dalí’s Aliyah: A Moment in Jewish History, Meadows Museum, Dallas, until 13 January 2019

dali–dallas

Salvador Dalí, The Land Come to Life: “The mountains and the hills shall break forth before you into singing and all the trees of the field shall clap their hands” (Isaiah 55.12), © 2018 Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Artists Rights Society. Photo by Kevin Todora

In 1966, Samuel Shore, head of Shorewood Publishers in New York, commissioned Salvador Dalí (1904–1989) to commemorate the twentieth anniversary of the founding of the State of Israel in 1948. Such a commission was not uncommon for the artist. In fact, from approximately 1965 to 1979, the artist’s output was largely comprised of painted works on paper, completed on commission and made expressly for production as limited-edition prints. 

The Shore commission was for a series of twenty-five paintings depicting the renewal of the Jewish people. Dalí completed his mixed media paintings in gouache, watercolour, and Indian ink on paper; the paintings were then reproduced as lithographs and published in a limited edition of 250 sets of twenty-five lithographs each. Dalí took inspiration from both the Hebrew Bible as well as contemporary history to address a variety of subject matter related to Jewish history and diaspora, spanning the course of over 2,000 years. Titled Aliyah, a Hebrew word that literally means ‘migration to the land of Israel’, the series was completed in 1968 in time for the celebration of Israeli Independence Day on April 3. Following their exhibition in 1968 the paintings and prints were offered for sale and dispersed; there are only a handful of complete sets known today. This rare complete set is shown for the first time since its acquisition by the Meadows Museum in 2017.

The set was generously given to the Museum by Linda P. and William A. Custard in celebration of Meadows Museum advisory council member Janet Pollman Kafka, and her twentieth year as Honorary Consul of Spain in Dallas. 

New Pre-Doctoral Fellowship for the Study of Spanish Art, Museo Nacional del Prado/Meadows Museum

recortadab-2The Meadows Museum at SMU in Dallas and the Museo Nacional del Prado in Madrid have announced a new pre-doctoral fellowship, part of the unique international partnership that unites these two leading museums. A grant from the Center for Spain in America (CSA) supports now the pre-doctoral Meadows/Prado Fellowship, designed to provide students with an intensive scholarly, professional, and international experience in curatorial work. The fellowships are an annual exchange with one appointment made by each institution.

The CSA and its Spanish counterpart, the CEEH, have collaborated with the Meadows Museum on several projects prior to this announcement, including the exhibition and catalogue for The Lost Manuscripts from the Sistine Chapel: An Epic Journey from Rome to Toledo (2011); the exhibition and catalogue for The Spanish Gesture: Drawings From Murillo to Goya in the Hamburger Kunsthalle (2014); Sorolla in America: Friends and Patrons (2015); and the exhibition catalogue Zurbarán: Jacob and His Twelve Sons, Paintings from Auckland Castle (2017).

Applications accepted until March 23, 2018

Forthcoming Exhibition: ‘Memory, Mind, Matter: The Sculpture of Eduardo Chillida’ at the Meadows Museum, Dallas

peine-del-viento-9-640x471

Eduardo Chillida, Peine del Vento, 1977
San Sebastián, Guipuzkoa, Spain

This spring, the Meadows Museum will present Dallas’s first exhibition dedicated exclusively to the work of Eduardo Chillida (1924–2002). Chillida, one of Spain’s most celebrated modern sculptors, is famous for his monumental iron and stone sculptures that shape both urban and rural landscapes. This exhibition includes 66 of the artist’s works, from his sculptures, to his drawings, collages, gravitations, graphic works, and a selection of his books. Co-curated by William Jeffett, chief curator of exhibitions for The Dalí Museum, and Ignacio Chillida, the artist’s son, the works in Memory, Mind, Matter: The Sculpture of Eduardo Chillida come exclusively from the Museo Chillida-Leku in Hernani (San Sebastián, Spain); the exhibition travels to Dallas from the Salvador Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida. A complimentary exhibition, Chillida in Dallas: De Musica at the Meyerson, is curated by Meadows/Mellon/Prado Curatorial Fellow Amanda W. Dotseth and will focus on the landmark commission by Chillida at Dallas’s Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center. The two exhibitions will open on February 4, 2018, and run through June 3.

The exhibition will be accompanied by an educational programme which will include:

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 10:30 A.M.
LUIS CHILLIDA, director, Fundación Eduardo Chillida-Pilar Belzunce
Memory, Mind, Matter: The Public Art of Eduardo Chillida in

Focus

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 12:15 P.M.
AMANDA W. DOTSETH, Meadows/Mellon/Prado curatorial fellow, Meadows
Museum
Medieval and Modern: Alabaster from Gil de Siloé to
Eduardo Chillida

THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 6:00-7:00 P.M.
BEATRIZ CORDERO, professor, Saint Louis University, Madrid
Lightness and Rightness: Eduardo Chillida and James Johnson
Sweeney in the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

FRIDAY, APRIL 20, 12:15 P.M.
JED MORSE, chief curator, Nasher Sculpture Center
Chillida in Dallas Part I: Chillida Downtown

SATURDAY, APRIL 21, 10:00 A.M.-1:00 P.M.
FAMILY DAY

FRIDAY, APRIL 27, 12:15 P.M.
SCOTT WINTERROWD, director of education, Meadows Museum
Chillida in Dallas Part II: Chillida in Dallas

 

Art historian, philanthropist and ARTES member William Jordan has died at 77

The Dallas News reports that internationally recognised art historian William B. Jordan died Monday in Dallas after a short illness.

After obtaining a Ph.D. from the Institute of Fine Arts in New York, he helped Mr. Algur Meadows form a new collection of Spanish paintings for Southern Methodist University. Later on, he was curator at the Dallas Museum of Art, Kimbell Art Museum and, eventually, a trustee of the Nasher Sculpture Center and the DMA.

In 1986, Dianne Goode and Dr. Bill Jordan are seen in this Fete Set photo.(Joe Laird /Staff Photographer)

In 1986, Dianne Goode and Dr. Bill Jordan are seen in this Fete Set photo.
(Joe Laird /Staff Photographer)

Jordan was known for his unerring eye and outstanding ability to identify potential acquisitions and new masterpieces. Perhaps his crowning achievement was the discovery and subsequent personal gift to the Prado Museum in Madrid of the Portrait of Philip III by the greatest Spanish painter of the Golden Age, Diego Velázquez. Jordan donated the work (estimated at $6 million) to the Prado on Dec. 17, 2016 and was consequently made a trustee of the most significant museum of Spanish art in the world.