Tag Archives: 20th century

Featured Exhibition: Futuruins, Palazzo Fortuny, Venice, until 24 March 2019

palazzofortunyinterniBorn in Granada in 1871, Mariano Fortuny trained as a painter in Paris before settling in Venice at 18. Moving in international artistic circles, he befriended Gabriele D’Annunzio, Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Marchesa Casati and Prinz Fritz Hohenlohe-Waldenburg, among others. He was fascinated by the idea of the Gesamtkunstwerk, a total union of music, drama and visual presentation which he strove to realise in his set designs. In addition to his work for the theatre, he decorated aristocratic homes and museums. His luxury textiles were produced in a factory on the Guidecca in Venice and sold in shops in all European capitals. Towards the end of the 1930s Mariano Fortuny retired to a palace in the San Beneto district of Venice. Decorated by the artist, the palazzo now hosts the Fortuny Museum.

04-muve-san-pietroburgo-web-banner-quadrato-mobile-px-443-x-443Currently on show at the museum is Futuruins. The exhibition focuses on the the multiple meanings attributed to ruins through the centuries. Works from Venetian Civic Museums, the State Hermitage Museum and other international collections explore the architectural and sculptural remains of the Greco-Roman, Egyptian, Assyrian-Babylonian and Syrian civilisations. Contemporary art looks at the physical and moral ruins of today’s society. This is an exploration of the ruins of architecture, cities and suburbs, but also of men and ideas, as the result of time, negligence, degeneration, natural or political tragedies such as war and terrorism.

Ruins are an allegory for the inexorable passage of time, always uncertain and changeable, disputed between past and future, life and death, destruction and creation, Nature and Culture. The aesthetics of ruins is a crucial element in the history of Western civilisation. The ruin as concept symbolises the presence of the past but at the same time contains within itself the potential of the fragment. Fragments of antiquity, covered by the patina of time, hold cultural and symbolic implications that turn them into valid ‘foundation stones’ for building the future. Coming from the past, they confer a wealth of meaning on the present and offer an awareness to future projects.

Curated by Daniela Ferretti, Dimitri Ozerkov with Dario Dalla Lana, the exhibition includes works by such modern artists as Acconci Studio, Giorgio de Chirico,  Jean Dubuffet, Anselm Kiefer, Alberto Burri. Franco Guerzoni, Christian Fogarolli, Giuseppe Amato, Renato Leotta and Renata De Bonis have realised new commissions for the event. In addition, the State Hermitage Museum has lent more than 80 pre-modern works,  including paintings by Albrecht Dürer, Monsù Desiderio, Giovanni Paolo Pannini, Jacopo and Francesco Bassano, Parmigianino, Veronese, Jacob van Host the Elder, Arturo Nathan and Alessandro Algardi.

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Featured exhibition: Hermen Anglada-Camarasa. Una revisión pictórica de la colección, Caixaforum, Palma de Mallorca, until 30 August 2020

AngladaCamarasaRevisioPictorica_cartell_desktop-v3-esThroughout his career the Catalan painter Hermen Anglada-Camarasa (Barcelona 1871–1959 Pollença) worked mainly in the ‘modernista’ style. During WWI he travelled to Mallorca for the first time and eventually settled for the rest of his life in the north of the island, where in 1967, following the artist’s wishes his house in Pollença was turned into a museum. This exhibition in Palma de Mallorca displays a wide range of his paintings alongside his collection of costume, furniture and Japanese prints, in a setting evocative of his house. 

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Research Seminar: Inigo Thomas, ‘Who was Tomàs Harris?’, UCL, London, 24 January 2019

Harris, Tomas, 1908-1964; Two Olive Trees Grown Together

Tomàs Harris, Two Olive Trees Grown Together, UCL Art Museum © the artist’s estate. Photo credit: UCL Art Museum

This seminar will be dedicated to Tomàs Harris (1908–1964). Harris was a MI5 spy, but also a painter of Spanish landscapes and a scholar of Spanish art. His outstanding collection of prints by Goya is now at the British Museum.

The lecture will take place in Seminar Room 3, UCL History of Art, 20 Gordon Square, London, 6–8pm. Works made or collected by Harris will be on display at UCL Art Museum on the afternoon on the lecture, 2–5:30pm.

Click here for more information.

 

 

Closing soon: Dalí’s Aliyah: A Moment in Jewish History, Meadows Museum, Dallas, until 13 January 2019

dali–dallas

Salvador Dalí, The Land Come to Life: “The mountains and the hills shall break forth before you into singing and all the trees of the field shall clap their hands” (Isaiah 55.12), © 2018 Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Artists Rights Society. Photo by Kevin Todora

In 1966, Samuel Shore, head of Shorewood Publishers in New York, commissioned Salvador Dalí (1904–1989) to commemorate the twentieth anniversary of the founding of the State of Israel in 1948. Such a commission was not uncommon for the artist. In fact, from approximately 1965 to 1979, the artist’s output was largely comprised of painted works on paper, completed on commission and made expressly for production as limited-edition prints. 

The Shore commission was for a series of twenty-five paintings depicting the renewal of the Jewish people. Dalí completed his mixed media paintings in gouache, watercolour, and Indian ink on paper; the paintings were then reproduced as lithographs and published in a limited edition of 250 sets of twenty-five lithographs each. Dalí took inspiration from both the Hebrew Bible as well as contemporary history to address a variety of subject matter related to Jewish history and diaspora, spanning the course of over 2,000 years. Titled Aliyah, a Hebrew word that literally means ‘migration to the land of Israel’, the series was completed in 1968 in time for the celebration of Israeli Independence Day on April 3. Following their exhibition in 1968 the paintings and prints were offered for sale and dispersed; there are only a handful of complete sets known today. This rare complete set is shown for the first time since its acquisition by the Meadows Museum in 2017.

The set was generously given to the Museum by Linda P. and William A. Custard in celebration of Meadows Museum advisory council member Janet Pollman Kafka, and her twentieth year as Honorary Consul of Spain in Dallas. 

Closing Soon: Cortés. Retrato y estructura, Fundación Unicaja de Cádiz, until 31 January 2019

Estudio-del-pintor4

The painter’s study. Estudio del pintor. Private collection, Madrid. Photo: María Bisbal.

Hernán Cortés Moreno (Cádiz, 1953) has succeeded in renewing the genre of Spanish portraiture by introducing to it elements of abstraction, pop art and cinematography. This exhibition of some 130 portraits of key individuals important to the history, politics and culture of Spain over recent decades and includes a portrait of Sir John Elliott, the historian of Spain and the Americas and Emeritus President of ARTES. Other sitters include the former Socialist prime minister, Felipe González, the historian, physician and philosopher Gregorio Marañón and the British-born architect Norman Foster as well as friends and family members from the 1980s onwards. 

Click here for more information, and here for the artist’s website

Conference: Gotik global – kolonial – postkolonial, Dresden, October 26–7, 2018

prac3a7a_da_se_03Gotik global – kolonial – postkolonial: Gotisierende Sakralarchitektur auf der Iberischen Halbinsel und in Lateinamerika vom 19. bis zum 21. Jahrhundert

Dresden, Technische Universität, Institut für Kunst und Musikwissenschaft, Raum ABS/E08/H, 26. – 27.10.2018
Tagung der Technischen Universität Dresden, Institut für Kunst- und Musikwissenschaft der Philosophischen Fakultät in Zusammenarbeit mit der Carl Justi-Vereinigung e.V.

Immer wieder werden im iberischen und iberoamerikanischen Raum – wie weltweit –  auch heute noch gotisierende Kirchen errichtet. Einige sind typisch für die Neugotik, andere, wie die Almudena-Kathedrale in Madrid oder diejenige von Vitoria-Gasteiz, scheinen als verspätete Bauten des 20. Jahrhundert aus europäischer Sicht aus der Zeit gefallen zu sein. Doch wird gerade in Lateinamerika bis heute an zahlreichen solcher Projekte weitergebaut.
So scheint es zunächst sinnvoll zu überprüfen, ob die stillschweigende Annahme, „die Gotik“ sei eine abgeschlossene Stilepoche, aus globaler Perspektive überhaupt stimmt. Wie ging die zweifellos zunächst kolonial begründete Gotik-Ausbreitung in den überseeischen Gebieten der ehemals spanischen und portugiesischen Weltreiche in eine eigene postkoloniale Adaption über, welche Gründe gab es hierfür und welche stilistischen Ausprägungen wurden und werden gefunden? Wie begann die Entwicklung in den „Mutterländern“? Ist sie dort und in den ehemaligen Kolonien ähnlich oder unterschiedlich verlaufen, gibt es fortdauernde Verbindungen? Lassen sich Parallelen in anderen Weltregionen beobachten? Sind die Phänomene alleine auf die Gotik beschränkt oder gibt es Parallelen für andere Stile?
Im Workshop der Carl Justi-Vereinigung e.V. soll diese Problematik stichprobenartig untersucht werden. Denn ein systematischer Gesamtüberblick ist zur Zeit kaum möglich, sind doch nicht einmal die potenziell wichtigsten Bauten bekannt.

PROGRAMM:
FREITAG, DEN 26.10.2018

Eröffnung / Begrüßung / Einführung
9.30 Uhr
Grußworte
Prof. Dr. Antonio Hurtado (Dresden), Prorektor der TU Dresden
Prof. Dr. Lutz Hagen (Dresden), Dekan der Philosophischen Fakultät
Prof. Dr. Margit Kern (Hamburg), Vorstand der Carl Justi-Vereinigung e.V.

10.00 Uhr
Bruno Klein (Dresden): Gotische Architektur des 20. und 21. Jahrhunderts –
global – kolonial − postkolonial

10.45 Uhr
Pablo de la Riestra (Nürnberg/Buenos Aires): Einmal Gotik – immer Gotik

11.30 Uhr Pause

Von der Neugotik zur Moderne:
Kastilische und katalanische Beispiele
12.00 Uhr
Henrik Karge (Dresden):
Vicente Lampérez y Romea – Gotik als Idealbild und historisches Phänomen

12.45 Uhr
Judith Urbano (Barcelona): La finalización de la Catedral de Barcelona y otros proyectos neogóticos de Augusto Font y Carreras

13.30 Uhr Pause

15.30
Joan Molet Petit (Barcelona):
Las interpretaciones del gótico en la obra del arquitecto Josep Vilaseca, entre lo arqueologista y lo victoriano

16.15 Uhr
Sergio Fuentes Mila (Barcelona): Revisitar el gótico en la arquitectura civil barcelonesa de finales del siglo XIX. El caso del arquitecto José Doménech y Estapá (1858-1917)

17.00 Uhr
Bettina Marten (Bonn/Dresden): Considerations on the Almudena-Cathedral at Madrid

18.00 Mitgliederversammlung der CJV

20.00 Uhr
Gemeinsames Abendessen

SAMSTAG,  DEN 27.10.2018

Die „moderne“ Neugotik in Lateinamerika
10.00 Uhr
Bruno Klein: Einführung

10.15 Uhr
Martín Checa Artasu (Mexiko-Stadt/Barcelona):
The religious orders as diffusers of the neo-gothic architecture in Latin America

11.00 Uhr
María Aranda Alonso (Madrid/Dresden):
El templo de la Merced de San José de Costa Rica : Punto de partida para estudiar el neogótico en Centroamérica

11.45 Uhr
Paula Vermeersch (São Paulo):
O processo construtivo da Catedral da Sé, São Paulo, 1911-1954

12.30 Uhr
Barbara Borngässer (Dresden):
Neugotik und Moderne im Süden Brasiliens: Die Kirchenbauten Gottfried Böhms

13.15 Uhr
Abschlussdiskussion

16.00 Uhr
Besichtigung aktueller „gotischer“ Architektur in Dresden (Schlosskapelle,  Sophienkirchen-Monument)

Kontakt:
bruno.klein@tu-dresden.de
barbara.borngaesser@online.de
bettina.marten1@tu-dresden.de

Conference: Performing Otherness: a Postcolonial Approach to Francoist Spain Performing Otherness: a Postcolonial Approach to Francoist Spain, Edinburgh College of Art, October 26, 2018

image001

Photomontage by Jean Harold, sent to Picasso by Jean Cocteau and captioned, on the back: by “Picasso – Negro period”

This international symposium opens up discussion of Spanish art and culture in relation to the construction of discourses of coloniality in 20th-century Spain, especially in the Francoist period.

It attempts to identify methodological approaches that would allow us to understand the consolidation of hegemonic colonial discourses and how they continue in Spain today. This examination involves an analysis of constructs of Otherness in two directions – inwards and outwards. On the one hand, how did artists, performers, writers, or other cultural brokers, based in Spain, exoticise other cultures as well as their own culture as part of official rhetoric (e.g. state-funded exhibitions relating to colonial territories in Africa; translations of Chinese texts/images, state administration of rural Spain). On the other hand, the analysis is concerned with Spanish (self-)representation as Other within international contexts (eg. Picasso in African attire; flamenco in imagery for tourism/political campaigns; Hispanic Studies as a political contestation to the dictatorship).

Organisation: María Iñigo Clavo (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya) of the R&D Research Group “Experiences of the Political in Francoist Spain” (MINECO) with Claudia Hopkins in the School of History of Art, University of Edinburgh.

Schedule

9am – 9.30am: Registration

9.30am – 10am: Welcome and introduction, Yayo Aznar (Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia) and María Iñigo Clavo (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya)

10am – 1pm: Panel 1:  Appropriating the exotic, Chair: Paloma Gay-Blasco (University of St Andrews)

  • 10am – 10.30am: Neil Cox (University of Edinburgh), [Talk on Picasso – title tbc]
  • 10.30am – 11am: Esther Planas (University of the Arts London), Dissociative Fugue Disorder. Auto-exoticism as bio politics: Ways of questioning the production of culture during Francoism
  • 11am – 11.15am: Tea/Coffee Break
  • 11.15am – 11.45am: Francisco Aix (Universidad de Sevilla), Flamenco as a means to identity. An Andalusian perspective
  • 11.45am – 12.15pm: Alicia Fuentes Vega (Universidad Complutense Madrid), Title to be confirmed  
  • 12.15pm – 1pm: Panel discussion

2pm – 5pm: Panel 2: On the meaning of colony in Francoism, Chair: Richard Williams (University of Edinburgh)

  • 2pm – 2.30pm: Helena Miguélez-Carballeira (Bangor University), The Spanish rural subject and the Instituto Nacional de Colonización (1939-1971): A Biopolitical Perspective
  • 2.30pm – 3pm: Claudia Hopkins (University of Edinburgh), The Dream of a Spanish-Moroccan Brotherhood. Art and Exhibitions, 1936-1956
  • 3pm – 3.15pm: Tea/Coffee Break
  • 3.15pm – 3.45pm: Carles Prado Pons (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya). A triangulated alterity: China in Spain, 1880-1930
  • 3.45pm – 4.15pm: José Saval (University of Edinburgh). Latin American Boom or Boomerang: the impact of the periphery in the metropolis.
  • 4.15pm – 5pm: Panel discussion and closing remarks

Free to attend, booking required. Click here to reserve a ticket. 

Click here for more information.