Tag Archives: design

‘Hidden Gems’, ICOM-ICDAD virtual conference, 15- 16 October 2020, registration is open

The ICDAD 2020 virtual conference looks at “hidden gem” objects, exploring collections from Asia, Europe, the US, and Mexico.

Please click here to register for the conference

About this Event

Every public decorative arts and design collection has hidden corners and unplumbed depths, and many private collections are difficult for outsiders to access during the best of times, much less during a pandemic. As decorative arts and design professionals face the possibility that we might not be able to visit each other’s museums and discuss with colleagues in person for some time, this conference gives us the opportunity to uncover unexpected objects and stories that have not yet been told. Focusing on decorative arts and design collections from around the globe, the 2020 ICDAD conference explores collections recently brought to light, reinterprets beloved objects through a new lens, and shows how technology can make storied historical art newly relevant.

Because this is a global conference, times are listed for New York, Paris, and the local time of each presenter. The schedule is as follows:

Program

Times are listed for New York, Paris, and the local time of each presenter.

DAY 1: Thursday, October 15
Session One
7:00 AM USA Eastern time; 13:00 Paris; 16:00 Ekaterinburg, Russia; 19:00 Taiwan; 20:00 Japan

Naoyuki Watanabe — Oda Collection of 20th Century Design

Annie Ting-An Lin — Objects Betwixt and Between: Objects from the Nationaal Museum van Wereldculturen

Ludmila Budrina — Malachites of the Demidoff Family: Reconstruction of the Collection and Potential Digital Representation

Moderators: Melissa Rinne, Shoshana Resnikoff

Session Two
12:00 PM USA Eastern time; 18:00 Paris; 18:00 Netherlands; 19:00 Finland

Femke Coevert, Dafne Diamante, Aafke Weller, and Maud van Suylen — Panoramas from the Depths of the Rijksmuseum’s Storage Room

Maddalena Napolitani — Balthazar-Georges Sage: The “Hidden Collector” and his Cabinet of Decorative Arts

Leena Svinhufvud and Susanna Thiel — The Design Attic: Investigating Hidden Processes in Designer Archives

Moderators: Kai Lobjakas, Shoshana Resnikoff

Session Three
7:00 PM USA Eastern; 1:00 Paris; 6:00 PM Mexico Central

Rebecca Tilles — Uncovering Hillwood, Washington D.C.’s Hidden Gem

Harrison Schley – The Zalinsky Collection: A Union Soldier’s Trove of Japanese Swords and Art

Claudia Marín — Devotion and Self-Representation in the 18th Century: Arts and Crafts at Museo de Arte Religioso Ex Convento de Santa Mónica

Moderators: Annamarie Sandecki, Shoshana Resnikoff


DAY 2: Friday, October 16
Session Four
9 AM USA Eastern; 15:00 Paris; 14:00 Portugal

Levi Higgs —Mining the David Webb Jewelry Archive

Naoko Adachi — Finding a Place in Museums for Japanese Photograph Albums from the Late-Nineteenth Century

Samantha Coleman-Aller — Hidden Gems: A Rare Group of Irish Glass Pieces

Moderators: Kai Lobjakas, Shoshana Resnikoff

Opens Today: Super/Natural: Textiles of the Andes, Art Institute of Chicago, until 23 June 2019

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Mantle (detail), 100 BC/AD 200, Paracas

Over the course of millennia, textiles were the primary form of aesthetic expression and communication for the diverse cultures that developed throughout the desert coasts and mountain highlands of the Andean region. Worn as garments, suspended on walls of temples and homes, and used in ritual settings, textiles functioned in multiple contexts, yet, within each culture, the techniques, motifs, and messages remained consistent.
This exhibition features over 60 textiles along with a small selection of ceramics from the museum’s collection that together explore the ways select Andean cultures developed distinct textile technologies and approaches to design. While emphasizing the unique aspects of each culture and highlighting Andean artistic diversity, the exhibition also invites comparisons across cultures and time periods. These objects speak to shared ideas concerning everyday life, the natural world, the supernatural realm, and the afterlife, demonstrating a unified visual language that spans the Andes region from its ancient past to modern communities.

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Featured Exhibition: Futuruins, Palazzo Fortuny, Venice, until 24 March 2019

palazzofortunyinterniBorn in Granada in 1871, Mariano Fortuny trained as a painter in Paris before settling in Venice at 18. Moving in international artistic circles, he befriended Gabriele D’Annunzio, Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Marchesa Casati and Prinz Fritz Hohenlohe-Waldenburg, among others. He was fascinated by the idea of the Gesamtkunstwerk, a total union of music, drama and visual presentation which he strove to realise in his set designs. In addition to his work for the theatre, he decorated aristocratic homes and museums. His luxury textiles were produced in a factory on the Guidecca in Venice and sold in shops in all European capitals. Towards the end of the 1930s Mariano Fortuny retired to a palace in the San Beneto district of Venice. Decorated by the artist, the palazzo now hosts the Fortuny Museum.

04-muve-san-pietroburgo-web-banner-quadrato-mobile-px-443-x-443Currently on show at the museum is Futuruins. The exhibition focuses on the the multiple meanings attributed to ruins through the centuries. Works from Venetian Civic Museums, the State Hermitage Museum and other international collections explore the architectural and sculptural remains of the Greco-Roman, Egyptian, Assyrian-Babylonian and Syrian civilisations. Contemporary art looks at the physical and moral ruins of today’s society. This is an exploration of the ruins of architecture, cities and suburbs, but also of men and ideas, as the result of time, negligence, degeneration, natural or political tragedies such as war and terrorism.

Ruins are an allegory for the inexorable passage of time, always uncertain and changeable, disputed between past and future, life and death, destruction and creation, Nature and Culture. The aesthetics of ruins is a crucial element in the history of Western civilisation. The ruin as concept symbolises the presence of the past but at the same time contains within itself the potential of the fragment. Fragments of antiquity, covered by the patina of time, hold cultural and symbolic implications that turn them into valid ‘foundation stones’ for building the future. Coming from the past, they confer a wealth of meaning on the present and offer an awareness to future projects.

Curated by Daniela Ferretti, Dimitri Ozerkov with Dario Dalla Lana, the exhibition includes works by such modern artists as Acconci Studio, Giorgio de Chirico,  Jean Dubuffet, Anselm Kiefer, Alberto Burri. Franco Guerzoni, Christian Fogarolli, Giuseppe Amato, Renato Leotta and Renata De Bonis have realised new commissions for the event. In addition, the State Hermitage Museum has lent more than 80 pre-modern works,  including paintings by Albrecht Dürer, Monsù Desiderio, Giovanni Paolo Pannini, Jacopo and Francesco Bassano, Parmigianino, Veronese, Jacob van Host the Elder, Arturo Nathan and Alessandro Algardi.

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Updated Programme: COLLECTING SPAIN: SPANISH DECORATIVE ARTS IN BRITAIN AND SPAIN, Hochhauser Auditorium, Victoria and Albert Museum, 8 and 9 June 2018

V&ACoordinators: Ana Cabrera and Lesley Miller

This conference explores collecting practices, attitudes to and perceptions of Spanish decorative arts in Britain and Spain from the 19thcentury onwards, and how these attitudes influenced the development of museums and museum collections in both countries. The case studies aredrawnfrom the British and Spanish museum collections.

The conference is organisedin joint sessions dealing with the same subject from British and then Spanish perspectives. The first day considers the collecting of particular media while the second day focuses on the dissemination, display and conservation of these collections. The conference includes poster sessions during the coffee breaks.

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Programme

Friday, 8thJune 2008: Collecting Spanish Decorative Arts

10.00             Registration and collecting of conference packs; displaying of posters

10.20            Introduction

Ana Cabrera, V&A

10:30       Collecting, Display & Dissemination: The Changing Face of the Decorative Arts Collection at South Kensington, 1852-1873

Susanna Avery-Quash, National Gallery, London

Lustreware and Furniture

Chair: Holly Trusted, V&A

11.00             Collecting Spanish Lustreware at the Victoria and Albert Museum

Mariam Rosser-Owen, Asian Department, V&A

11:30            A Survey and History of the Collecting of Spanish Decorative Arts: Lustreware

Jaume Coll, Museo Nacional de Cerámica, Valencia

12.00-12.30.     COFFEE BREAK

12:30      Collecting Spanish Furniture, Woodwork and Leatherwork, 1850-1950

Nick Humphrey, Furniture, Textiles and Fashion department, V&A

13:00             Collecting Spanish Furniture in Madrid, 1880-1920

Sofía Rodríguez, Museo Nacional de Artes Decorativas, Madrid

13.30-14.30       LUNCH

Textiles and Fashion

Chair: Sonnet Stanfill, V&A

14:30             Following the Thread: Collecting Spanish Textiles at the Victoria and Albert Museum

Ana Cabrera, Marie S.-Curie Fellow, V&A

15:30             Textile Collecting in Catalonia

Silvia Carbonell, Centre de Documentació i Museu Tèxtil, Terrasa

16:00            Fashion and Spain at the Victoria and Albert Museum

Oriole Cullen, Furniture, Textiles and Fashion Department, V&A

16:30             From Dress to Fashion: The Collection of The Museo del Traje

Helena López del Hierro, Museo del Traje, Madrid

16.30-17.00       TEA BREAK

Sculpture and Plaster Casts

Chair: Edward Payne, Auckland Castle Project

17.00             A Vogue for St Francis

Xavier Bray, Wallace Collection, London

17:30       Spanish Monuments Displayed at South Kensington: Raising the Profile of Spanish Art through Plaster Casts

Holly Trusted, Sculpture, Metalwork, Ceramics and Glass Department, V&A

18:00       Electrical Treasuries: The Decorative Arts Collection from Antiquity at the Museo Nacional de Reproducciones, 1881-1915

María Bolaños, Museo Nacional de Escultura, Valladolid

18.30-19.00       DISCUSSION

Saturday, 9thJune 2008: Collecting Spanish decorative arts continued

Silver

Chair: Antonia Boström, V&A

10:15       The Scholar, the Scoundrel and the Skater: How the V&A Collections of Hispanic Silver were formed

Kirstin Kennedy, Sculpture, Metalwork, Ceramics and Glass Department, V&A

10:45             Collecting Spanish Silver

Jesús Rivas, Universidad de Murcia

11.15-11.45COFFEE BREAK

Displaying, Interpreting and Conserving Spanish Decorative Arts

Chair: Christopher Wilk, V&A

11.45            Displaying Decorative Arts in Britain and Spain. A Comparative Analysis

Isabel Rodríguez, Museo Nacional de Artes Decorativas, Madrid

12.15             Spain in the Europe 1600-1815 Galleries at the V&A

Lesley Miller, Furniture, Textiles and Fashion Department, V&A

12.45             The20th-century Galleries at the V&A

Corinna Gardner and Johanna Agerman Ross, Design, Architecture and Digital Department, V&A

13.15-14.15LUNCH

Displaying, Interpreting and conserving Spanish decorative arts

Chair: Joanna Norman, V&A

14.15             The Conservationof the Cast Courts. New Discoveries from Spanish Casts

Victor Borges, Conservation Department, V&A

14:45             Collecting in Action: Building a Spanish Gallery in Bishop Auckland

Edward Payne, The Auckland Project

15.15             Closing remarks

Joanna Norman, Head of the Victoria and Albert Research Institute (VARI)

Miguel González Suela, Directorate of the State Museum, Spanish Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports