Author Archives: tomnickson2013

CEEH ARTES Scholarships 2021. Call for applications, deadline 31st January 2021

Thanks to the generous support of CEEH (Centro de Estudios Europa Hispánica), ARTES, awards a number of scholarships each year to students working on any aspect of Spanish or Hispanic visual culture before 1900. The deadline for all applications is 31st January each year and the Scholarship Committee usually informs successful applicants by 15th March. Scholarship winners are normally invited to an awards ceremony at the ARTES AGM in the summer. Please read the guidelines for each scholarship, as well as the general guidelines below.

Travel scholarships

Final year undergraduates and postgraduate students registered for a full or part-time degree course at a UK university may apply for up to £1000 towards the costs of travel to Spain for research purposes (which may include field work, attendance at a conference, or other recognised forms of research).

£3000 scholarship for PhD students at a UK university

ARTES offers one scholarship each year to a student registered for a full- or part-time doctoral degree at a UK university. The scholarship is intended to contribute towards the costs of tuition, living and/or research, and therefore students with full funding are not eligible.

£3000 scholarship for PhD students or post-doctoral scholars in Spain who wish to conduct research in the UK

Doctoral students or those who received their doctorate less than four years before the application deadline may apply for this scholarship provided that they were or are registered for doctoral study at a university in Spain.

New Virtual Tour of Cristo de la Luz in Toledo

In association with ARTES, MAVCOR – the Center for the Study of Material & Visual Cultures of Religion – is delighted to announce the first in a series of virtual tours of buildings around the world.

The tour of the remarkable mosque of Christ of the Light in Toledo, Spain, is freely accessible at https://mavcor.yale.edu/material-objects/giga-project/christ-light-mosque-toledo.  Users can explore the building in three dimensions, with additional texts, images and commentaries by Dr Tom Nickson.

Juan Facundo Riaño Essay Medal 2020

12.124.1ARTES is delighted to announce the winner of the 2020 Juan Facundo Riaño Essay Medal, awarded with the generous support of the Office of Cultural and Scientific Affairs of the Spanish Embassy in London

Plate [detail], Portugal, ca. 1500–1525, embossed silver-gilt, 3.3 x diam. 22 cm. New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art. Image: Public Domain.

This year’s prize is awarded to Dr Simon Park, an early career scholar at the University of Oxford. Simon’s essay, ‘Chasing Wild Men (in Silver)’ examined silverwork in early Renaissance Portugal, and was highly commended by the committee.

We regret that the postponement of our AGM means we cannot award the prize in person, but congratulate Simon on a wonderful piece of research.

 

 

ARTES CEEH Scholars 2020

ARTES and CEEH are delighted to announce the first ever ARTES CEEH Scholars! Out of many excellent applications, we are very pleased to make the following four awards:

Scholarship for a PhD student in the UK (£3000)

Carter LyonCarter Lyon (University of Glasgow)

Title: Spanish Golden Age Art Theory in Practice: A case study of Vicente Carducho’s Self Portrait in the collection of Sir William Stirling Maxwell

Supervisors: Dr Mark Richter and Dr Hilary Macartney

PC.116_01

Vicente Carducho, Self Portrait (c. 1633-38). Oil on canvas. 102 x 83cm. The Stirling Maxwell Collection, Pollok House, Glasgow, PC.116. © CSG CIC Glasgow Museums and Libraries Collections

My research concerns the relationship between art theory and artistic practice in the Spanish Golden Age as evidenced in the works of the scholar-artist Vicente Carducho (1568-1638). At the core of my project are Carducho’s Self Portrait (c. 1633-38, Glasgow Museums) and his treatise Diálogos de la Pintura (1633). Adopting a technical art history methodology, I have conducted a technical study of Self Portrait that I will interpret in light of Carducho’s presentation of painting as a liberal art and his proposals for its practice. Consideration of Carducho’s professional activities and contemporary Spanish paintings and treatises will inform my analysis.

 

 

 

Scholarship for a PhD/post-doc student in Spain (£3000)

Alex MillonAlexandra Millón Maté (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)

Title: “Fancy pictures”? The British Reception of Murillo, 1650-1900

Supervisors: Professor Felipe Pereda Espeso (Harvard University) and Dr. María Cruz de Carlos Varona (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid).

The main purpose of this interdisciplinary project is to study the reception of genre painting by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (Seville, 1617-1682) in the United Kingdom between 1650 and 1900. It is a project dedicated to one of the fundamental chapters of my doctoral thesis registered at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. To carry out this project, it is necessary to reside in London for at least 6-8 weeks to have daily access to the National Gallery Archive, the British Library, the City of London Archive, the Royal Academy Archive, the Tate Gallery Archive and Dulwich Picture Gallery Archive.

Alex Millon2

Esteban Murillo, Four Figures on a Step, c. 1655-60. Kimbell Art Museum painting

In the same way, it will be very important for my work to have a longer access to the archives of Nigel Glendinning and Enriqueta Harris both at the Warburg Institute and at the University of London, as well as the collection and auction documentation area of The Courtauld Institute of Arts. Exceptionally, this project also includes some trips to other nearby cities to continue documentation work at Bedforshire Archives, Dyrham Park and Kingston Lacy, and just one more trip to Scotland. In Edinburgh I will visit the Spanish collection of the Scottish National Gallery and consult the documentary section dedicated to Murillo in his library and, in Glasgow, I will visit the collection of Sir William Stirling Maxwell at Pollok House.

ARTES CEEH Travel Scholarships (£1000 each)

RasbridgeVictoria Rasbridge (University College London)

Title: Intersecting Identities: Troubled and Troubling Representations of Queenship on the Early Modern Spanish Stage

Supervisor: Dr Alexander Samson

I plan to spend eight days in Almagro in early July, sufficient time to attend the three-day AHCT conference, explore the archives, and attend a variety of performances. Specifically, in the Museo Nacional de Teatro, I will examine the ‘Genealogía’ of the ‘Cofradía de la Novena’ manuscript found in the ‘archivo documental’. Its collection of members’ personal anecdotes pertaining to specific performances and roles will grant new insight into how visual representations and staged performances of queenship were adapted for different audiences in different spaces. Moreover, the unique opportunity to view the comedia in its original setting will allow me to experience first-hand how performance and staging have been adapted to the physical space of the corral and, in turn, how that space dictated or prevented specific staging choices.

Rasbridge1

Queen Mariana of Austria, Diego Velázquez [1652]. Oil on Canvas, 231 x 131cm . Madrid, Museo Nacional Del Prado

Following this, I intend to spend a further ten days in Madrid dividing my time between the Real Biblioteca and the BNE. Firstly, in the Real Biblioteca, I will investigate the numerous comedia manuscripts and personal correspondence detailing royal reactions to performances held in its ‘Conde de Gondomar’ collection. Secondly, in the BNE, I will consult the extensive ‘Teatro’ collection, particularly interesting for its copy of Calderón de la Barca’s ‘Triunfar muriendo’ and a rare 48-volume series of comedias (1652-1704). Using these materials, I will examine marginal annotations to uncover how important scenes have been staged and enacted.

 

Sarah Slingluff (University of Edinburgh)

Sarah SlinguffTitle: Material Culture of the Arab/Berber Conquest: Excavations at the fortress of Zorita Castle and Surveying the Museums of the thaghr al-awsaṭ

Supervisor: Dr Glaire Anderson

I intend to conduct research this July at Zorita Castle in order to discover the ways in which those who led the Arab/Berber conquest of the Iberian Peninsula lived. In addition to the excavation, I will document holdings of museums in Castile La Mancha, Extremadura, and Madrid relating to life in Islamic Spain. This research allows a comparison of early medieval elite and non-elite experiences in central Spain.

Sarah Slinguff2

View of the fortress of Zorita de los Canes, from Recopolis. Photo by Sarah Slingluff, March 2020

This work will support my doctoral thesis on both the life of non-elite peoples in early medieval Spain, but also on the ways that this experience is represented in Spanish institutions.

 

 

Professor Trevor Dadson, 1948-2020

ARTES records with regret the death of Professor Trevor Dadson in January 2020. As Editor-in-Chief of the Hispanic Research Journal from 2012 to 2017, Trevor was a tremendous enthusiast of the annual visual arts issue, and a great supporter of its editors, Tom Nickson and Sarah Symmons.

Trevor was also an incredibly distinguished scholar whose work encompassed cultural, literary and social history. He dedicated his career to the study of the Spanish Golden Age, becoming one of the world’s foremost experts on the era. He  published dozens of books, chapters and research papers throughout his career and was made a Fellow of the British Academy in 2008. In that same year, the Spanish town of Villarrubia de los Ojos named a new street after him, and in 2015 he was awarded the title of Encomienda de la Orden de Isabel la Católica by King Felipe VI of Spain for his services to Spanish culture. In 2016, he was elected a Corresponding Fellow of the Real Academia Española and the Real Academia de la Historia.

His monographs include a major study in Spanish of the Moriscos of the Campo de Calatrava in Spain (2007), a history of the printing of the ‘Rimas’ by Lupercio and Bartolomé Leonardo de Argensola (2010), a study of Diego de Silva y Mendoza, Count of Salinas (2011), and an edition in Spanish of the travel diaries of Elizabeth Lady Holland and the novelist George Eliot, who both visited Spain in the nineteenth century (2012). Other books include the letters memorials of the Count of Salinas (Marcial Pons-CEEH, 2015), an edition of the Count’s unedited poetry based on the autograph originals (Real Academia Española, 2016), and a revised and updated second edition of his book on the Moriscos of Villarrubia de los Ojos (Iberoamericana-Vervuert.

In 2014 he published a book in English on the Moriscos of the Campo de Calatrava: Tolerance and Coexistence in Early Modern Spain (Tamesis Books); a revised edition of this work in Spanish was published by Cátedra in 2017. His latest projects included an edition of the more than 500 letters the Count of Salinas sent as Viceroy from Lisbon between 1617 and 1622, as well as editing a volume of studies on Islamic Culture in Spain to 1614 by L. P. Harvey (former Professor of Spanish at Queen Mary).

Trevor will be remembered as an exceptional scholar and energetic scholar. Our thoughts are with his family at this time.

[this obituary is adapted from one published by Queen Mary, where Trevor taught for many years: https://www.qmul.ac.uk/sllf/news/stories/remembering-trevor-dadson.html%5D

 

Book launch for ‘Gothic Architecture in Spain: Invention and Imitation’, Courtauld Institute of Art, 12th February, 6.30-8pm

Please join us for the launch of Gothic Architecture in Spain: Invention and Imitation, eds Tom Nickson and Nicola Jennings: https://courtauld.ac.uk/event/gothic-architecture-in-spain-invention-and-imitation-book-launch 

6.30pm, Research Forum South Room, Courtauld Institute of Art, Vernon Square, Penton Rise, London WC1X 9EW

From the dazzling spectacle of Burgos Cathedral to the cavernous nave of Palma Cathedral or the lacy splendour of San Juan de los Reyes, Spain preserves a remarkable variety of inventive but little understood Gothic buildings. Yet Gothic architecture in Spain and the Spanish kingdoms has traditionally been assessed in terms of its imitation of northern European architecture, dismissed for its ‘old-fashioned’ or provincial quality, and condemned for its passive receptivity to ‘Islamic influence’. But did imitation really triumph over invention in the architecture of medieval Iberia? Are the two incompatible? Can inventio and imitatio offer useful or valid analytical tools for understanding Gothic architecture? And to what extent are invention or imitation determined by patrons, architects, materials or technologies? This essay collection brings together leading scholars to examine Gothic architecture from across Iberia from the thirteenth to the sixteenth century, and provides the first significant account of Spanish Gothic architecture to be published in English since 1865.

The launch directly follows a Medieval Work-in-Progress Seminar by Beate Fricke, ‘Colour and Chaos’, starting at 5pm in the same room. Attendance is free and all are welcome to attend. Details here: https://courtauld.ac.uk/event/colour-and-chaos

Call for submissions: ARTES Essay Prize and CEEH scholarships, deadline 31 January 2020

The deadline for the ARTES’ annual essay prize is fast approaching at the end of January: further details here

 

 

 

31 January is also the deadline for our annual scholarships, including

The Juan Facundo Riaño Essay Medal: Call for Submissions, deadline 31 January

To encourage emerging scholars that are based in the UK, ARTES, in collaboration with the Embassy of Spain, awards an annual essay medal to the author of the best art-historical essay on a Hispanic theme, which must be submitted in competition and judged by a reading Sub-Committee. The medal is named after Juan Facundo Riaño (1829-1901), the distinguished art historian who was partly responsible for a growing interest in Spanish culture in late nineteenth-century Britain. The winner is also awarded a cash prize of £400, and the runner-up is awarded a certificate and prize of £100 – both prizes are generously sponsored by the Office for Cultural and Scientific Affairs of the Embassy of Spain. Prize-winners also receive a year’s free membership to ARTES, and the winning essays are considered for publication in the annual visual arts issue of Hispanic Research Journal. See the information about eligibility and rules of competition. The deadline is 31st January each year. 

Entering the Essay Competition

The judges will be looking for evidence of originality of thought and high academic and literary quality. Essays must focus on the production or reception of the art, architecture or visual culture of the Hispanic world, defined in the broadest possible terms.

As a permanent reminder of the winner’s achievement, an essay medal is awarded, together with a cash prize of £400. The winning essay will be considered for publication in the annual visual arts issue of Hispanic Research Journal. The runner-up may be awarded the ARTES commendation certificate, together with a prize of £100, and an essay so commended may also be considered for publication in Hispanic Research Journal. Both prize-winners also receive a year’s free membership to ARTES.

Essays are submitted by 31st January each year, and are read by the Essay Medal Committee, appointed by ARTES. The decision of the Committee shall be final. Presentation of the medal is usually made at a special ceremony in London in July the same year, and the result is announced on the ARTES website.

Previous Winners

2019: No award was made

2018: Javier Vicente Arenas, a Masters student at the Warburg Institute, for ‘Constructing a “Transmediterranean” Identity: Rodrigo de Borgia’s Italian Angels in Valencia Cathedral (1472-81)’.

2017: David Cambronero, a MA student at The Courtauld, for ‘Lighting the Great Mosque of Cordoba in the Caliphal Period’.

2016: Leah McBride, a PhD student at Glasgow University, for ‘‘The grave is only half full; who will help us fill it?’: The Politics of Trauma in Alfredo Jaar’s Rwanda Project‘.

2015: Rebekah Lee, a PhD student at the University of York, for ‘Catherine of Austria, Queen of Portugal and the Courtly Portrayal of Middle Age’.

2014: Lesley Thornton-Cronin, a first year PhD student at Glasgow University, for ‘Image-Making by Means of Metaphoric Transposition in the Work of Joan Miró’.

2013: Maite Usoz, a third year PhD student at King’s College, London, for  ‘Sex and the City: Urban Eroticism in Rodrigo Muñoz Ballester’s Manuel Series’.

Regulations for the Essay Medal

1. Essays must be anonymous. Entrants must select a pseudonym under which to submit their text, with a sealed envelope bearing the pseudonym and containing their real name, address and telephone number. Please note that because of the anonymity of the submissions, no acknowledgement of receipt will normally be sent. If a receipt is required, please send a stamped envelope addressed to your pseudonym or to a friend.

2. There is no age limit for entrants, but the Essay Medal Committee reserves the right to give preference to entrants who have not previously published in the field of Hispanic visual arts. We welcome submissions from researchers in a variety of circumstances, but envisage that most essays will be submitted from early career scholars, post-graduate students or undergraduates with exceptionally good end-of-degree dissertations. Details of degrees or qualifications, as well as previous publications, must be submitted with the entrant’s real name and address. Entrants should ideally be resident or studying in the UK, but exceptions may be made if entrants can demonstrate sustained engagement with students, scholars, objects or materials in the UK.

3. The Hispanic world is defined in its broadest sense to include all Hispanic and Lusophone regions (including, for example, Latin America). Visual arts are defined in their broadest sense to include all material and visual culture, including film and photography.

4. The essay must not have been previously published and must not have been awarded any national or international prize. A note of any departmental prizes awarded to it must accompany the entrant’s real name and address.

5. Essays may be up to 8,000 words in length, including bibliography (though this is not not necessary if full footnotes are given), all notes and appendices. Entrants are encouraged to submit shorter pieces, however. Shorter submissions will not be penalised on grounds of length, but overlength essays will be refused. A word count and a summary of up to 250 words (additional to the work total) must be included.

6. The essay should demonstrate original thinking. It may be based on a dissertation, and may involve original research, although essays based on a survey of secondary material will also be considered if they are of suitable quality. However, the essay should be self-contained and especially prepared for this competition.

7. Entries must be written in English. They must be typed or printed, double-spaced, and contained in a simple folder. Pages should not be stapled or bound together, and each page should be numbered. Diagrams or illustrations may be included and should be captioned. They may take the form of photocopies, provided they can be easily read. Sources of information and images must be acknowledged. Entrants are advised that their essays and illustrations will need to be photocopied.

8. The winning essay may be  considered for publication in the visual arts issue of Hispanic Research Journal, subject to the usual process of refereeing, and to acceptance by the Editors, whose decision on this is final. In the event of the essay being accepted for publication, some reworking may be required. Essays may not be offered for publication elsewhere while they are sub judice.

9. In the case of any dispute about the award, the decision of the ARTES Essay Medal Committee shall be final.

10. ARTES reserves the right to make no award if none of the entries is considered worthy.

11. The closing date for entries is 31st January each year. Essays received after this date will not be considered.

12. Two identical copies of the essay should be sent to: Dr Tom Nickson, Courtauld Institute of Art, Vernon Square, Penton Rise, London WC1X 9EW, UK. Envelopes should be clearly marked ‘Artes Essay Medal’. Electronic copies cannot be accepted.

13. Any queries should be directed to tom.nickson@courtauld.ac.uk