Author Archives: tomnickson2013

Lecture, ‘Images, devotion and emotion in 13th- and 14th-century Castile’. 5pm, Wednesday 18th April, 2018. Courtauld Institute of Art

image001Fernando Gutiérrez Baños (University of Valladolid), ‘Images, devotion and emotion in 13th- and 14th-century Castile’.

5pm, Wednesday 18th April 2018. Courtauld Institute of Art

What was the role of images in the religious experience of Castilian people of the 13th and 14th centuries? There is no clear answer, and the scarcity of written evidence has prompted much problematic speculation. However, on the basis of the images themselves and of relevant literary sources, including the well-known Cantigas de Santa María and works by 14th-century authors such as Juan Ruiz and Juan Manuel, it is possible to explore a number of key issues. The talk will be divided into three sections. One focuses on the 13thcentury: ‘Active images: the Cantigas de Santa María and their aftermath’. Another looks to the 14th century: ‘Passive images: the reception and dissemination of the Crucifixus dolorosus in Castile’. And it concludes by looking ‘beyond’ Art History. In the 1960s a Spanish politician coined the (in)famous tourist slog, ‘Spain is different’. His aim was to encourage foreigners to visit Spain, but the slogan is representative of a commonplace that has been repeated time and again since the Romantic era. Ultimately, my talk offers an invitation to reconsider whether Castilian and Spanish devotional practices are really so very different from those recorded elsewhere in medieval western Europe.

Fernando Gutiérrez Baños is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Art History of the University of Valladolid (Spain). He has been Frances A. Yates Short-Term Research Fellow at London’s Warburg Institute (2006) and Visiting Fellow at Princeton’s Index of Christian Art (2013). He specialises in art of the 13th and 14th centuries, focusing mainly on painting and art patronage. He is currently developing a research project on Castilian tabernacle-altarpieces of the Late Middle Ages, funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy, Industry and Competitiveness and by the European Union through the ERDF (reference HAR2017-82949-P).

This is the second lecture in the Coll & Cortes Medieval Spain Seminar Series 2018-20, focused on images and devotion in late medieval Spain.

Lecture: Felipe Pereda, ‘Images’ Oblivious Memory: Funerary Laments from Ancient Greece to El Greco’. Courtauld Institute of Art, London, 4pm, Thursday 25th January, 2018

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Felipe Pereda (Harvard), will give the inaugural lecture for the 2018-19 Coll & Cortes Medieval Spain Seminar Series at 4pm on Thursday 25th January in the Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre of the Courtauld Institute of Art, London.

An old narrative tradition going back to Ancient Egypt but documented across the Mediterranean – from the Middle East to Greece — shows women attending funerals performing theatrical, but also highly ritualized gestures that express unbearable pain. This visual trope corresponds to a practice that was surveyed and prosecuted in this part of the world well before the arrival of Christianity. The practice continued in Iberia throughout the Middle Ages, producing from the 12th century onwards an extraordinary tradition of painting and monumental sculpture. This lecture will explore the persistence, survival and repression of this practice and discuss the contribution of the visual arts to the production of cultural memory.

 

Felipe Pereda is Fernando Zóbel de Ayala Professor of Spanish Art at Harvard University. Born in Madrid, he studied at the Universidad Complutense, and the Autónoma University where he received his PhD (1995) and taught until 2011. In more recent years, he has also taught at the Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas (Universidad Autónoma de México), and Johns Hopkins University (2011-15). He has worked on Spanish late medieval and early modern art, art theory, image theory and history of architecture.

His books include, La arquitectura elocuente (1999), El atlas del Rey Planeta (3rd. ed. 2003), and Images of Discord. Poetics and Politics of the Sacred Image in 15th century Spain (Spanish ed. 2007; English translation, Harvey Miller, forthcoming). He has recently published on artists such as Luis de Morales, Ribera, or Zurbarán.

Lecture: ” The Palace of Pedro I in Seville, ‘very much like the residence of the Muslim kings’?”, SOAS, 7pm, 11 October 2017

ISLAMIC ART CIRCLE at SOAS
Monthly Lecture

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The Palace of Pedro I in Seville, ‘very much like the residence of the Muslim kings’?
Dr Tom Nickson
Wednesday, 11 October 2017
7.00 p.m., Khalili Lecture Theatre, Main Building, SOAS
Chaired by Professor Hugh Kennedy
Enquiries: rosalindhaddon@gmail.com

Job: Assistant Curator, Spanish Gallery, Auckland Castle, UK

Spanish galleryAuckland Castle Trust is seeking an Assistant Curator to support the Senior Curator: Spanish Art in the delivery of the Spanish Gallery project.

Salary: £19,500 to £21,500

Click here to see the full job description
Please send a CV and covering letter of no more than 2 sides to recruitment@aucklandcastle.org by July 5 2017

Lecture: Tom Nickson on ‘Sensing the Holy: Architecture and the Senses in Medieval and Early Modern Spain’

10-toledo-cathedral-11The London Society for Medieval Studies is hosting a lecture on Tuesday, January 24th at 7.00pm by:

Tom Nickson (The Courtauld Institute of Art) presenting on: ‘Sensing the Holy: Architecture and the Senses in Medieval and Early Modern Spain’.

Wolfson Room (NB01), IHR Basement, Senate House (located on Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU).

All those who are interested in Medieval Studies are very welcome to attend!

Curators in Conversation: Ribera across the Generations. 6:30-8:30 pm, Thursday 9th February, 2017

 

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With
Gabriele Finaldi (Director, The National Gallery) &
Edward Payne (Senior Curator: Spanish Art, Auckland Castle Trust)
at
Colnaghi, 26 Bury Street, London SW1Y 6AL

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ARTES welcomes Gabriele Finaldi, curator of Ribera: Master of Drawing at the Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid (22 November 2016 – 19 February 2017), in conversation with Edward Payne, curator of the exhibition’s second incarnation Between Heaven and Hell: The Drawings of Jusepe de Ribera at the Meadows Museum, Dallas (12 March – 11 June 2017). They will be discussing the genesis of the exhibition which celebrates the publication of the first complete catalogue raisonné of Ribera’s drawings. The event will take place in the stunning new Colnaghi gallery in Bury Street, followed by wine and jamón provided by Spanish restaurateurs Brindisa.

ARTES would like to thank the Instituto Cervantes and its Director, Julio Crespo Maclennan for their support with this event.

This event is open to ARTES members only. RSVP to Alice@colnaghi.com

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Call for Submissions: Travel scholarships, deadline 31 January 2019

Thanks to the generous support of art dealers Coll & Cortés, ARTES offers travel scholarships for BA and postgraduate students at UK universities who are working on any aspect of Spanish, Portuguese or Latin American visual culture before 1800.

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Final year undergraduates and postgraduate students registered for a full or part-time degree course at a UK university may apply for up to £600 towards the costs of travel to Spain, Portugal or Latin America for research purposes (which may include field work, attendance at a conference, or other recognised forms of research). Reports by those previously awarded travel scholarships are available here.

The deadline for these awards is 31st January 2019.

Scholarship application guidelines.

  1. Applications should be made in English as a single MS Word or PDF file and sent to artesscholarships@gmail.com . Applicants are requested to include ‘Travel Scholarship’ in the email subject, but should not expect acknowledgement of receipt.
  2. All applications should include: a) project title, b) a max 100-word project summary, c) a max 600-word explanation of the research to be conducted (including explanation of the necessity of travel); d) a short breakdown of how the money will be spent, together with details of any other funding received; e) an academic CV. Applicants should ensure that an academic advisor sends a reference to the same email address by the 31st January deadline: this may be in English, Spanish or Portuguese. Applications without a reference will not be considered.
  3. Candidates may apply for any other scholarship or award offered by ARTES, but are unlikely to be successful in more than one category in any one year.
  4. Application is open to any student or scholar who can demonstrate compliance with the criteria set out above, other than employees of Coll & Cortés, committee members of ARTES, or their immediate families. Scholarships are not awarded to students who have not yet begun their programme of study, are valid for one year only, and are not renewable. Applications may be submitted for travel conducted in the 12 months prior to the submission deadline, though funding for such trips is likely to be considered less urgent than for forthcoming trips that would not be possible without funding.
  5. Applications will be assessed according to the following criteria: Originality of research, significance of research, feasibility of successful completion, academic rigour (command of the field, spelling, fluency etc), potential of the applicant (an assessment of the strength of the CV, taking into account the student’s current status), financial need, value for money, strength of reference, necessity of travel.
  6. Successful scholarship winners are normally informed by 1st March, and are invited to attend a presentation in London in July (exceptions may be made if the costs of attendance at this event are prohibitive). They are required to write a 600-word report on their funded research project, to be sent to artesscholarships@gmail.com within nine months of receipt of the scholarship.
  7. Any publications arising from research supported by these scholarships should include acknowledgement of ARTES.
  8. The scholarships come with no institutional affiliation, and ARTES and Coll & Cortés cannot take responsibility for the support or welfare of scholarship holders.
  9. The decision of the Scholarship Committee shall be final. The Committee reserves the right to make no awards in cases where it deems that applications are not of satisfactory quality. Coll & Cortés and ARTES accept no legal responsibility to any applicant or third party arising from this notice, or the award or otherwise of a scholarship.  The Scholarship Committee will not enter into correspondence with unsuccessful applicants or their academic advisors regarding its decisions.

ARTES private visit to the V&A’s Opus Anglicanum exhibition, 9am, Weds 14 December

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The Toledo Cope (detail), copyright Toledo, Tesoro de la Catedral, Museo de Tapices y Textiles de la Catedral

 

The stunning exhibition of medieval English embroidery at the Victoria & Albert Museum includes several pieces long held in Spanish treasuries, including two wonderful copes from Toledo and Daroca. Curator Glyn Davies has kindly offered to take ARTES members on a private visit to the exhibition on Wednesday 14th December at 9am (ie before the exhibition opens to the public at 10am). Tom Nickson (ARTES Vice-Chair) will also speak briefly about how these English embroideries came to Spain, and their fate thereafter.

 

This event is open to ARTES members only. To join us (£35/£20) see details here. Members can confirm a place by emailing artesiberia@gmail.com, and should arrive at the V&A’s Secretariat Gate by 8.50am (NB, latecomers cannot be admitted).