Tag Archives: Al-Andalus

Post-doc: 3 positions at the University of Louvain, ‘The origin and early development of philosophy in tenth-century al-Andalus: the impact of ill-defined materials and channels of transmission’

photoPost-doc: 3 position, 3-year contracts, ERC Advanced project 740618: The origin and early development of philosophy in tenth-century al-Andalus: the impact of ill-defined materials and channels of transmission (2017-2022), Université catholique de Louvain, Belgium
Deadline: 10 November 2017

PhilAnd is a five-year Advanced ERC project to start in October 2017 at the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL) under the supervision of Prof. Godefroid de Callataÿ. The objective of PhilAnd is to conduct a large-scale exploration of how, and under which form, philosophy appeared for the first time in al-Andalus. At the crossroads of several major lines of enquiries in modern scholarship and in line with recent discoveries having important chronological implications, PhilAnd focuses on the 10th century, a period usually disregarded by historians on the assumption that philosophy as such was not cultivated in the Iberian Peninsula before the 11th-12th centuries. Its originality is also to put emphasis on ‘ill-defined’ materials and channels of transmission, a field which remains largely unexplored. PhilAnd will be conducted in partnership with the Warburg Institute (University of London).
As part of this project, three post-doc positions of three years each (to start from 2 January 2018) are offered at the UCL in relation with the three following sub-projects (SP):
1) the Ikhwān al-afā’: This SP will aim at producing a comprehensive survey of all the elements which are likely to inform us about the chronology of redaction and – where applicable – of introduction into al-Andalus of the three works that have commonly been ascribed in sources to this most influential group of thinkers known as Ikhwān al-Ṣafā’ (‘The Brethren of Purity’), namely: a) the Rasā’il (‘the Epistles’); b) the Risāla Jāmi‘a (‘The Comprehensive Epistle’) and, c) the Risāla Jāmi‘at al-Jāmi‘a (‘The Super-Comprehensive Epistle’). This chronology is currently far from clear.
2) Ibn Washiyya and the Nabatean Corpus: This SP aims to evaluate the impact of the Filāḥa Nabaṭiyya (‘The Nabatean Agriculture’), a complex and enigmatic Arabic treatise on agriculture written in the Orient, on the development of both Islamic and Jewish Neoplatonism in al-Andalus from the 10th to the 12th century. The focus will be on the reception of the ‘philosophical’ and bāṭinī (rather than agronomical) aspects of the work, with the aim of understanding why this notoriously esoteric work remained so influential even to Jewish thinkers like Judah Halevi and Maimonides.
3) Ibn Masarra: This SP will lead to the first monograph entirely devoted to Ibn Masarra’s Kitāb khawāṣṣ al-ḥurūf (‘The Book of the Properties of Letters’), consisting of an extensively annotated translation of this mystical treatise, together with an in-depth exploration of its place in the history of ‘ilm al-ḥurūf, the Islamic science of letters – including its links with the Jewish Kabbala – up to the time of Ibn ‘Arabī. This will fill an important gap and provide a valuable resource for the study of Islamic mysticism in al-Andalus.

The qualifications required for any of these sub-projects are:

  1. a PhD in Islamic Studies, in Middle Eastern Studies, or related fields;
  2. an excellent command of Classical Arabic (the knowledge of additional languages such as ancient Greek, Latin and in particular Hebrew is considered an advantage);
  3. a first-rate track record and research experience;
  4. publications of articles in peer-reviewed international journals or monographs with recognized academic publishers;
  5. academic writing and presentation skills in English (the working language of the project);
  6. the ability to work both individually and as part of a team.

These three post-doc positions are full-time equivalent. They are offered for a period of 12 months, renewable twice (three years in total) upon good performance. The post-docs retained will be required to reside in Belgium for the whole period of their fellowship. They will be asked to contribute to the intellectual life of the ERC project and of the UCL.


How to apply?

Applications should be made via pdf files and contain the following:

(1) a cover letter setting out the candidate’s qualifications and motivation for applying for one of the three positions offered (maximum 2 pages);

(2) a curriculum vitae (maximum 3 pages);

(3) a list of publications;

(4) two samples of published work (articles, chapters) in pdf (preferably in English);

(5) a transcript of grades and/or copy of the PhD certificate;

(6) the name (with title, affiliation and email) of four people who have accepted to be contacted as potential referees.
Applications should be made electronically and sent to the following address:

godefroid.decallatay@uclouvain.be

The application deadline is 10 November 2017
Interviews will be arranged between 4 and 6 December 2017.

Candidates selected for the interviews will be contacted by mid-November 2017, and asked to write a short research design on a topic to be announced at that moment.

Employment should become effective from 2 January 2018.

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CFP: The Artistic Heritage of al-Andalus (Berlin, October 2017)

2017-01-carljusti-logoCFP: The Artistic Heritage of al-Andalus (Berlin, 27-28 Oct 17)
Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, October 27 – 28, 2017

Deadline: 28 February 2017

The distinction between own and foreign culture plays a pivotal role in the making of religious, ethnic, and national identities. This was demonstrated by Bernd Roeck in his 2007 introduction to the forth volume in the series Cultural Exchange in Early Modern Europe. Forging European Identities, 1400-1700. Only the resurgence of a majority society and its demarcation against a minority society enables the forming of identity. But what happens in a multi-confessional and multi-ethnic society like the one that existed on the Iberian Peninsula until 1614? Can the foreign repertoire be distinguished clearly from the own at all, or has it not rather become part of a mutual cultural reality?

The history of Spain is defined by phases of cultural opening and seclusion. Whereas Alfonso X and Pedro I furthered the integration of al-Andalus’ art and architecture into the national narrative through their pro-Islamic cultural policy, the staging of a unified Catholic culture became the central topic of painting, sculpture and architecture during the Counter-Reformation. Only from the 18th century, a re-valorisation of the Islamic heritage in al-Andalus took place. Its part in forming a Spanish national identity was subject to controversial discussion on the background of changing historic and political necessities in the 19th and 20th centuries. Simultaneously, architects of the time advertised the Moorish Revival and helped Ibero-Islamic architecture to gain global centre stage. The Alhambrismo not only became one of the most favoured interior styles of the 19th century, but also dominated the Great Exhibitions which regularly took place after 1851. Besides Spain, Prussia (1867), Brazil (1876), or Mexico (1884) presented themselves with a Neo-Moorish exhibition pavilion.

This year’s annual conference of the Carl Justi Association aims to examine selectively the importance of al-Andalus for the forming of national identity from the Middle Ages to the present age. Papers on the following thematic emphases are requested:

– Exchange and confrontation during the Reconquista (1085-1492)
– Stating of a unified Catholic culture during Counterreformation
– Re-valorisation and historiographic debate in the 18th/19th centuries
– Franquismo and national renewal in the 20th/21st centuries

Presentations will have a duration of 20 mins. Languages of the conference are German, Spanish, English. Please send your abstract of max. 300 words and a short curriculum vitae to:
conference@transculturalstudies.ch

Workshop – Islamic Archaeology Day (28 January 2017, London)

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3rd Islamic Archaeology Day 2017
(Jointly hosted by SOAS and UCL)
Saturday, 28 January 2017
UCL Institute of Archaeology, Room 612
31-34 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PY

Includes talks on al-Andalus!

We invite you to register online at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/islamic-archaeology-day-2017-tickets-2953…. The registration fee of £10 (£5 for students) will cover lunch, refreshments and a wine reception. We would be very grateful if you could register as soon as possible and before Friday, January 20th so we can order the appropriate amount of sandwiches in time!

Corisande Fenwick
Hugh Kennedy
Scott Redford
Tim Williams

Programme

10:30 Registration and Coffee
11:00 Welcome & Introduction
Corisande Fenwick, Hugh Kennedy, Scott Redford, Tim Williams
11:15 Dehistan (Turkmenistan), archaeological evidence of a pilgrimage city
Alistair Northedge
11:40 Islamic archaeology in the Moroccan Sahara: settlement dynamics in the Draa Valley
Corisande Fenwick, Maria Gatto, Louise Rayne, Martin Sterry, David Mattingly and Youssef Bokbot
12:05 Islamic archaeology in East Africa, challenges and obstacles
Stephane Pradines
12:30 Citadels, Bazars and Shrines – An Overview of the Current State of Islamic Archaeology in Afghanistan
Arezou Azad and Andy Miller

1:00 Lunch (provided)

2:00 From Fustat to Merv: Revisiting the Beginnings and Technical Development of Islamic Glazed Wares
Moujan Matin, Oliver Watson, Michael Tite
2:25 Studying medieval Iranian world metalware: the ISLAMETAL project
Annabelle Collinet
2:50 Royal workshops: recent investigations into production at Madinat al-Zahra and the Alhambra.
Chloë N. Duckworth, Kate Welham, Derek Pitman, Alberto García Porras and David J. Govantes Edward
3:15 The yellow opaque glazes from Madinat al-Zahra (second half of the 10th century): a rare local production or an import?
Elena Salinas, Trinitat Pradell and Michael Tite

3:45 Tea break

4:15 Suburban life in early Islamic Jarash (Jordan): New evidence for urban development over the longue durée
Louise Blanke
4:40 The Islamic-Christian frontier in medieval central Iberia: new research at Molina de Aragón and Atienza
Guillermo García-Contreras Ruiz, Rowena Banerjea, Alex Brown and Aleks Pluskowski
5:05 The role of archaeology in the representation of Islamic Middle East: A European museum prospective
Benedict Leigh
5:30 Archaeology of the Pearl-Fishing Towns of the Arabian Gulf: Case Studies in Globalization during the Late Islamic Period
Rob Carter

6pm Reception in SCR.

7pm Dinner (at own expense) at local restaurant.

Al-Andalus: Intensive Summer Course (Cordoba)

Al-Andalus

Al-Andalus, Problems and Perspectives
CASA ÁRABE, CORDOBA
25-30 JULY 2016

This Intensive Summer Course held in Casa Árabe Cordoba will introduce English speakers to the fascinating history of al-Andalus. Specialists from different Spanish academic institutions will guide a select group of students in a series of seminar-style intensive classes throughout a week-long course.

Together we will explore the political, social and economic aspects of this history, examine the intellectual and artistic developments and achievements that the civilization of al-Andalus reached, and look at its various contemporary meanings and legacies. Students will be familiarized with various types of sources, textual and material remains, and the relevant scholarship in order to reach a better understanding of al-Andalus.

VENUE

The choice of the Casa Árabe in Cordoba as the venue for the course hardly needs any explanation. It is housed in the beautiful Casa Mudejar, a 14-16th century building whose restoration received the World Heritage City Award 2011 from the Spanish Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports. The Casa is located at a three-minute walk from the Mosque-Cathedral.

INTENDED STUDENTS AND COURSE STRUCTURE

The course is directed at university students and scholars who – regardless of their specialization – want to become familiar with the most relevant issues related to the history of al-Andalus. Taught in English, it aims at guiding the participants to the wide range of scholarly research on al-Andalus. Thirty students will be selected from among the applicants (for the application procedure see below and click here).

Students are not required to have knowledge of Arabic or any other language except English; for those who are proficient in Arabic, guidance in the Arabic sources will be provided as a complement.

A basic bibliography of studies in English will be provided once the selection of students has been made and registration has been finalized. The students selected are expected to become familiar with that bibliography before the beginning of the course. A more comprehensive bibliography, including the most relevant studies in a variety of languages, will be provided during the course.

In each class unit (2 hours), the teachers will provide a brief outline of the topic dealt with and devote the rest of the class to reading texts (in English translation) illuminating some salient aspects of the respective topic.

As the course is intensive and text-oriented, students are required to be present at each class. An attendance certificate will correspondingly be provided. For those interested in producing a research paper, assignments will be given and upon submission (within six months) an examination certificate can be obtained.

SCHEDULE

The course will take place during the last week of July, from Monday 25 to Saturday 30, with a total of 30 hours. On Saturday morning, class will be held in the Umayyad palatine town of Madinat al-Zahra’. The course will be completed by two archeological workshops on Wednesday and Friday morning.

 

El legado de al-Ándalus: Las antigüedades árabes en los dibujos de la Academia (Madrid)

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Exhibition
El legado de al-Ándalus: Las antigüedades árabes en los dibujos de la Academia
Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando
Madrid
22 September – 8 December 2015

Includes 175 works, the majority drawings along with six paintings and various prints from the Academy’s collections which illustrate Moorish antiquities from Andalucia.

Online catalogue, by Antonio Almagro and others.