Tag Archives: global

International Conference: Border Subjects/Global Hispanisms

International Conference: Border Subjects/Global Hispanisms, Birkbeck University, London, Friday 24 & Saturday 25 November 2017

lf_window_l

©Max Aguilera-Hellweg, El Trabajador, Ciudad Acuña, Mexico, The Border, July 1989.

This conference brings together scholars, curators, filmmakers, writers, and post-graduate students from Latin America and the Caribbean, the United States, Europe, and the UK. It stems from the ongoing collaboration between members of staff from the programmes of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies at Birkbeck, University of London, UK and the Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures, at the University of Pittsburgh, USA.

The processes we associate with contemporary forms of ‘globalization’ have – be they economic, political or cultural –spawned a variety of re-worldings that, via a number of transdisciplinary formations, have reconfigured the humanities, including Hispanism and Latin-Americanism, Cultural Studies, Postmodernism, Post-colonialism and even Post-structuralism being the most well-known. After the financial crisis, new (and not so new) trans, de-, and/or non-national or regional objects, subjects and assemblages are coming to the fore, redrawing and digitalizing established frontiers and differences as well as re-defining the politics of culture and its study. Before our very eyes, the transversal routes of migration world-wide are breaking down established frontiers, both in the old metropoli and in the so-called peripheries, at whose sites new cultural and political subjects are emerging. In the light of this global expansion of neoliberalism and new forms of governmentality, as well as the histories globalization brings into view, what are the concerns that are or should define the research agenda of a newly globalized Hispanism? In this conference, we revisit Luso-Hispanic and Latin@-American geographies, and reconsider the subjectivities emerging out of the above mentioned processes, in their varying conditions and trajectories, and also by way of the items in the material culture that conspire in their fashioning.

This conference is generously supported by The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities (BIH) and the Centre for Iberian and Latin American Visual Studies (CILAVS), both at Birkbeck, University of London. The Instituto Cervantes has also provided support for this event. In collaboration with Canning House and the Centre for Iberian and Latin American Visual Studies (CILAVS), a conversation between Ticio Escobar and John Kraniauskas will be hosted on Thursday 23 November 2017. Further information TBA.

Programme

Friday 24th November

Venue: Birkbeck, University of London Clore Management Lecture Theatre, Clore Management Centre, Torrington Square, London WC1E 7JL

9.30-9.45am            Welcome
Carmen Fracchia and Mari Paz Balibrea (CILAVS), Birkbeck, University of London

Session 1                  Black Nations in Imperial Spain
Chair, Carmen Fracchia, Birkbeck, University of London

9.45-11.15am          Elizabeth Wright, University of Georgia, ‘A Black Bard in the Court of Philip II’

Luis Méndez Rodríguez, University of Seville, ‘Another Way of Seeing Black Spain, Art, Society and Religion’

Helen Melling, Institute of Latin American Studies, University of London, ‘Envisioning Black Confraternities in Nineteenth-Century Peru’

11.15-11.30am        Tea/Coffee Break

Session 2                New Ecologies/ Post-Indigenism/ Museum Cultures in Latin America* Chair, Luciana Martins, Birkbeck, University of London

11.30-12.45pm        Sarah Radcliffe, University of Cambridge, ‘Border knowledges and socionatures: Sumak kawsay and de-/re-colonising food sovereignty in Ecuador’

Agata Lulkowska, PhD student, Birkbeck, University of London, ‘Transcending the borders of ‘indigenous’ filmmaking in Colombia’

Ticio Escobar, Museo de Arte Indígena Asunción, Lawyer, Author, Art Critic, and, former Minister of Culture of Paraguay, ‘Cultural critique as a positioning of the frontier, contemporaneity and difference’

*Please note that Ticio Escobar’s paper ‘La crítica cultural como posición de frontera, contemporaneidad y diferencia’ will be presented in Spanish.

12.45-2.30pm          Lunch

Session 3                  Transgressing Political Borders*
Chair, Luís Trindade, Birkbeck, University of London

2.30-4.00pm             Polly Savage, SOAS, University of London, ‘Transnational Art Education and International Solidarity with Independent Mozambique’

Christabelle Peters, University of Bristol, ‘Mana Africa, The Cultural Politics of Female Solidarity in Cuban-African Cooperation’

Inês Galvão, PhD student, University of Lisbon, ‘Crossing struggles through militant journalism: anti-apartheid, feminism and anti-colonialism in the trajectory of Stephanie Urdang’

*Please note this panel will continue at Birkbeck Cinema after the break. The Birkbeck Cinema is in 43 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PD.

4.00-5.00pm             Tea/Coffee Break

6.00 – 9.00pm

Film Screening*:     Spell Reel, 2017. Germany/Portugal/France/Guinea-Bissau. Directed by Filipa César. In Portuguese, Fula, Guinea-Bissau Creole, English, French; English subtitles. 96 min.

*To be screened with the presence of filmmaker Filipa César.

Spell Reel is the result of a multifaceted research and digitisation project that she initiated in 2011 with Sana na N’Hada and Flora Gomes. Having studied film in Cuba, the two began using the camera to observe the fight for independence in Guinea-Bissau (1963–74). After the decaying visual and audio material was digitised in Berlin, the filmmakers travelled with a mobile cinema to the places where the footage had originally been shot and showed it to audiences for the first time, adding their own commentary. They then moved on, also returning to Berlin. Spell Reel watches an archive at work to produce the present.

Programme

Saturday 25th November

Venue, Birkbeck, University of London. Room B36, Malet Street Main Building, London WC1E 7HX. Torrington Square entrance

Session 4                  Deterrioralization-Reterriorilization
Chair, John Kraniauskas, Birkbeck, University of London

10-11.30am              Juan Duchesne-Winter, University of Pittsburgh, ‘Neoanimism, South-South deterritorializations’

Jerome Branche, University of Pittsburgh, ‘The Bones of San José: Of Memory, Museums, and the Necropolitics of Slavery’

Conrad James, University of Birmingham, ‘You Should Know the Score by Now’, Spanish Caribbean (Native) New Yorkers’

11.30-11.45am        Tea/Coffee Break

Session 5                  Spaces of Flow, Travel and Friction
Chair, Patricia Siqueiras Bras, Birkbeck, University of London

11.45-1.15pm          Rory O’Bryen, University of Cambridge, ’The Fetish of Flow, Circulating Capital and The Novel in Nineteenth-Century Colombia’

Toby Green, King’s College London, ‘Travelling Concepts in the Atlantic World, Decoding Origins, Rethinking Alternatives’

Juan Poblete, University of California-Santa Cruz, ‘Americanism/o, Latin/o American frictions inside the United States’

1.15-3.00pm             Lunch

Session 6                  Latin Americanism in its Transtemporal Globality
Chair, Emily Baker, Birkbeck, University of London

3.00-4.30pm             Gonzalo Lamana, University of Pittsburgh, ‘Unthinkable Indians, Race, Coloniality and Metanoia in Colonial Peru’

Daniel Balderston, University of Pittsburgh, ‘Piglia’s Diaries, Recovering the Gestation of Plata quemada’

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CFP: Wider Worlds: Art and Audience Under the Spanish Crown, The Frick Collection, New York, April 5, 2018

zurbaran_asher-343x700
Call for Papers: 
Wider Worlds: Art and Audience Under the Spanish Crown, The Frick Collection, New York, April 5, 2018
Deadline: Dec 12, 2017

Symposium
The Frick Collection, New York

The Frick Collection is pleased to invite submissions for “Wider Worlds: Art and Audience under the Spanish Crown,” a public symposium inspired by the special exhibition Zurbarán: Jacob and His Twelve Sons, Paintings from Auckland Castle (January 31 to April 22, 2018). Co-organized with the Meadows Museum, in Dallas, where the paintings are currently on view, this exhibition marks the first time that Francisco de Zurbarán’s set of thirteen monumental canvases depicting the family of the biblical prophet Jacob will be displayed in the Americas.

Zurbarán’s paintings were probably commissioned in the 1640s for a monastery in colonial Spanish Peru, where the popularity of this particular iconography drew on histories positing the indigenous inhabitants of the Americas as “lost descendants” of the twelve tribes of Israel. The works traveled to England and, in 1756, entered the collection of the bishop Richard Trevor, an advocate for the rights of Jewish people. This history, as well as the apocryphal story of the paintings’ seizure by pirates, prompts us to think seriously about the afterlives of objects, anticipated versus accidental receptions, and art’s capacity for generating multivalent, sometimes competing, interpretations. For Jacob and His Twelve Sons, those interpretations range from justifying the enterprises of one colonial empire to serving as symbols of religious tolerance in another.

We welcome proposals for twenty-minute papers on the status of the art object and the circulation of objects and ideas in the early modern Hispanic world. Please send a C.V. and 250-word abstract by Tuesday, December 12, 2017, to academic@frick.org. Submissions from emerging scholars, including early career university and museum professionals and advanced doctoral students, are particularly encouraged. Possible lines of inquiry include:

• How artists, patrons, and audiences dealt with anxieties around distance, delay, and the conveyance of meaning in the diverse and multilingual early modern Hispanic world;
• Re-signification and/or halted trajectories in the biographies of objects, especially in a global context;
• The imaging of origin myths and master narratives;
• How Iberia’s Jewish and Islamic pasts were interrogated and reinterpreted in Catholic image practices;
• The issue of workshops, masters, and authorship and their relationship to global markets;
• The global and material turns in art-historical scholarship.

“Wider Worlds: Art and Audience under the Spanish Crown” is convened by Caitlin Henningsen (The Frick Collection) and Adam Jasienski (Southern Methodist University). Susan Grace Galassi (Senior Curator, The Frick Collection) will preside.

International Conference: Border Subjects/Global Hispanisms

International Conference: Border Subjects/Global Hispanisms, Birkbeck University, London, Friday 24 & Saturday 25 November 2017

lf_window_l

©Max Aguilera-Hellweg, El Trabajador, Ciudad Acuña, Mexico, The Border, July 1989.

This conference brings together scholars, curators, filmmakers, writers, and post-graduate students from Latin America and the Caribbean, the United States, Europe, and the UK. It stems from the ongoing collaboration between members of staff from the programmes of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies at Birkbeck, University of London, UK and the Department of Hispanic Languages and Literatures, at the University of Pittsburgh, USA.

The processes we associate with contemporary forms of ‘globalization’ have – be they economic, political or cultural –spawned a variety of re-worldings that, via a number of transdisciplinary formations, have reconfigured the humanities, including Hispanism and Latin-Americanism, Cultural Studies, Postmodernism, Post-colonialism and even Post-structuralism being the most well-known. After the financial crisis, new (and not so new) trans, de-, and/or non-national or regional objects, subjects and assemblages are coming to the fore, redrawing and digitalizing established frontiers and differences as well as re-defining the politics of culture and its study. Before our very eyes, the transversal routes of migration world-wide are breaking down established frontiers, both in the old metropoli and in the so-called peripheries, at whose sites new cultural and political subjects are emerging. In the light of this global expansion of neoliberalism and new forms of governmentality, as well as the histories globalization brings into view, what are the concerns that are or should define the research agenda of a newly globalized Hispanism? In this conference, we revisit Luso-Hispanic and Latin@-American geographies, and reconsider the subjectivities emerging out of the above mentioned processes, in their varying conditions and trajectories, and also by way of the items in the material culture that conspire in their fashioning.

This conference is generously supported by The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities (BIH) and the Centre for Iberian and Latin American Visual Studies (CILAVS), both at Birkbeck, University of London. The Instituto Cervantes has also provided support for this event. In collaboration with Canning House and the Centre for Iberian and Latin American Visual Studies (CILAVS), a conversation between Ticio Escobar and John Kraniauskas will be hosted on Thursday 23 November 2017. Further information TBA.

Programme

Friday 24th November

Venue: Birkbeck, University of London Clore Management Lecture Theatre, Clore Management Centre, Torrington Square, London WC1E 7JL

9.30-9.45am            Welcome
Carmen Fracchia and Mari Paz Balibrea (CILAVS), Birkbeck, University of London

Session 1                  Black Nations in Imperial Spain
Chair, Carmen Fracchia, Birkbeck, University of London

9.45-11.15am          Elizabeth Wright, University of Georgia, ‘A Black Bard in the Court of Philip II’

Luis Méndez Rodríguez, University of Seville, ‘Another Way of Seeing Black Spain, Art, Society and Religion’

Helen Melling, Institute of Latin American Studies, University of London, ‘Envisioning Black Confraternities in Nineteenth-Century Peru’

11.15-11.30am        Tea/Coffee Break

Session 2                New Ecologies/ Post-Indigenism/ Museum Cultures in Latin America* Chair, Luciana Martins, Birkbeck, University of London

11.30-12.45pm        Sarah Radcliffe, University of Cambridge, ‘Border knowledges and socionatures: Sumak kawsay and de-/re-colonising food sovereignty in Ecuador’

Agata Lulkowska, PhD student, Birkbeck, University of London, ‘Transcending the borders of ‘indigenous’ filmmaking in Colombia’

Ticio Escobar, Museo de Arte Indígena Asunción, Lawyer, Author, Art Critic, and, former Minister of Culture of Paraguay, ‘Cultural critique as a positioning of the frontier, contemporaneity and difference’

*Please note that Ticio Escobar’s paper ‘La crítica cultural como posición de frontera, contemporaneidad y diferencia’ will be presented in Spanish.

12.45-2.30pm          Lunch

Session 3                  Transgressing Political Borders*
Chair, Luís Trindade, Birkbeck, University of London

2.30-4.00pm             Polly Savage, SOAS, University of London, ‘Transnational Art Education and International Solidarity with Independent Mozambique’

Christabelle Peters, University of Bristol, ‘Mana Africa, The Cultural Politics of Female Solidarity in Cuban-African Cooperation’

Inês Galvão, PhD student, University of Lisbon, ‘Crossing struggles through militant journalism: anti-apartheid, feminism and anti-colonialism in the trajectory of Stephanie Urdang’

*Please note this panel will continue at Birkbeck Cinema after the break. The Birkbeck Cinema is in 43 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PD.

4.00-5.00pm             Tea/Coffee Break

6.00 – 9.00pm

Film Screening*:     Spell Reel, 2017. Germany/Portugal/France/Guinea-Bissau. Directed by Filipa César. In Portuguese, Fula, Guinea-Bissau Creole, English, French; English subtitles. 96 min.

*To be screened with the presence of filmmaker Filipa César.

Spell Reel is the result of a multifaceted research and digitisation project that she initiated in 2011 with Sana na N’Hada and Flora Gomes. Having studied film in Cuba, the two began using the camera to observe the fight for independence in Guinea-Bissau (1963–74). After the decaying visual and audio material was digitised in Berlin, the filmmakers travelled with a mobile cinema to the places where the footage had originally been shot and showed it to audiences for the first time, adding their own commentary. They then moved on, also returning to Berlin. Spell Reel watches an archive at work to produce the present.

Programme

Saturday 25th November

Venue, Birkbeck, University of London. Room B36, Malet Street Main Building, London WC1E 7HX. Torrington Square entrance

Session 4                  Deterrioralization-Reterriorilization
Chair, John Kraniauskas, Birkbeck, University of London

10-11.30am              Juan Duchesne-Winter, University of Pittsburgh, ‘Neoanimism, South-South deterritorializations’

Jerome Branche, University of Pittsburgh, ‘The Bones of San José: Of Memory, Museums, and the Necropolitics of Slavery’

Conrad James, University of Birmingham, ‘You Should Know the Score by Now’, Spanish Caribbean (Native) New Yorkers’

11.30-11.45am        Tea/Coffee Break

Session 5                  Spaces of Flow, Travel and Friction
Chair, Patricia Siqueiras Bras, Birkbeck, University of London

11.45-1.15pm          Rory O’Bryen, University of Cambridge, ’The Fetish of Flow, Circulating Capital and The Novel in Nineteenth-Century Colombia’

Toby Green, King’s College London, ‘Travelling Concepts in the Atlantic World, Decoding Origins, Rethinking Alternatives’

Juan Poblete, University of California-Santa Cruz, ‘Americanism/o, Latin/o American frictions inside the United States’

1.15-3.00pm             Lunch

Session 6                  Latin Americanism in its Transtemporal Globality
Chair, Emily Baker, Birkbeck, University of London

3.00-4.30pm             Gonzalo Lamana, University of Pittsburgh, ‘Unthinkable Indians, Race, Coloniality and Metanoia in Colonial Peru’

Daniel Balderston, University of Pittsburgh, ‘Piglia’s Diaries, Recovering the Gestation of Plata quemada’

CFP: International Perspectives on the History of Latin American Art, LASA 2018 (Barcelona, 23-26 May 2018)

01_diego_rivera_mural_01

Diego Rivera, The Making of a Fresco Showing the Building of a City, 1931, SFAI, San Francisco

CFP: International Perspectives on the History of Latin American Art, LASA 2018 (Barcelona, 23-26 May 18)

Deadline: 7 August 2017

The Art History of Latin America has been written, for the most part,  in the 20th and 21st century.  As a discipline it is the product of two distinct points of view: the individual countries’ national art histories and visions generated from other regions, which privilege supra-national conceptions of geography and identity. Be they the Hispanic art histories of the 1930s, the North American passion for Mexican muralism of the 1930s, the European interests in alternative forms of Baroque in the post Second World War period, or the high modernist interpretations of modern art in Latin America during the post-War period, the discipline of art history has been shaped by scholarship generated outside the region, as much as from the scholarship generated within it. In this panel we invite scholars to study the effects of a globalized perspective on Latin American Art History, specifically by analyzing the contributions of other regions to the understanding of the concept of Latin American art.  We welcome papers studying any of the topics above, as well as the recent histories that stress critical notions such as race, gender and class to create new readings of Latin American Art History.

To submit a paper proposal, please send a 100-200 word abstract and a c.v. to Michele Greet (mgreet@gmu.edu) and Mercedes Trelles (MERCEDESTRELLES@AOL.COM) by August 7, 2017. Submissions for session proposals are due to LASA by Sept. 7. We will inform you of your acceptance prior to that date so that papers that cannot be included in the panel may be submitted individually.