Tag Archives: Edinburgh

Conference: Performing Otherness: a Postcolonial Approach to Francoist Spain Performing Otherness: a Postcolonial Approach to Francoist Spain, Edinburgh College of Art, October 26, 2018

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Photomontage by Jean Harold, sent to Picasso by Jean Cocteau and captioned, on the back: by “Picasso – Negro period”

This international symposium opens up discussion of Spanish art and culture in relation to the construction of discourses of coloniality in 20th-century Spain, especially in the Francoist period.

It attempts to identify methodological approaches that would allow us to understand the consolidation of hegemonic colonial discourses and how they continue in Spain today. This examination involves an analysis of constructs of Otherness in two directions – inwards and outwards. On the one hand, how did artists, performers, writers, or other cultural brokers, based in Spain, exoticise other cultures as well as their own culture as part of official rhetoric (e.g. state-funded exhibitions relating to colonial territories in Africa; translations of Chinese texts/images, state administration of rural Spain). On the other hand, the analysis is concerned with Spanish (self-)representation as Other within international contexts (eg. Picasso in African attire; flamenco in imagery for tourism/political campaigns; Hispanic Studies as a political contestation to the dictatorship).

Organisation: María Iñigo Clavo (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya) of the R&D Research Group “Experiences of the Political in Francoist Spain” (MINECO) with Claudia Hopkins in the School of History of Art, University of Edinburgh.

Schedule

9am – 9.30am: Registration

9.30am – 10am: Welcome and introduction, Yayo Aznar (Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia) and María Iñigo Clavo (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya)

10am – 1pm: Panel 1:  Appropriating the exotic, Chair: Paloma Gay-Blasco (University of St Andrews)

  • 10am – 10.30am: Neil Cox (University of Edinburgh), [Talk on Picasso – title tbc]
  • 10.30am – 11am: Esther Planas (University of the Arts London), Dissociative Fugue Disorder. Auto-exoticism as bio politics: Ways of questioning the production of culture during Francoism
  • 11am – 11.15am: Tea/Coffee Break
  • 11.15am – 11.45am: Francisco Aix (Universidad de Sevilla), Flamenco as a means to identity. An Andalusian perspective
  • 11.45am – 12.15pm: Alicia Fuentes Vega (Universidad Complutense Madrid), Title to be confirmed  
  • 12.15pm – 1pm: Panel discussion

2pm – 5pm: Panel 2: On the meaning of colony in Francoism, Chair: Richard Williams (University of Edinburgh)

  • 2pm – 2.30pm: Helena Miguélez-Carballeira (Bangor University), The Spanish rural subject and the Instituto Nacional de Colonización (1939-1971): A Biopolitical Perspective
  • 2.30pm – 3pm: Claudia Hopkins (University of Edinburgh), The Dream of a Spanish-Moroccan Brotherhood. Art and Exhibitions, 1936-1956
  • 3pm – 3.15pm: Tea/Coffee Break
  • 3.15pm – 3.45pm: Carles Prado Pons (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya). A triangulated alterity: China in Spain, 1880-1930
  • 3.45pm – 4.15pm: José Saval (University of Edinburgh). Latin American Boom or Boomerang: the impact of the periphery in the metropolis.
  • 4.15pm – 5pm: Panel discussion and closing remarks

Free to attend, booking required. Click here to reserve a ticket. 

Click here for more information.

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Lecturer in Spanish, University of Edinburgh

2016-09-edinbgu-logoLecturer in Spanish

The Department of Hispanic Studies at the University of Edinburgh is advertising for a Lecturer in Spanish with a specialism in Peninsular Spanish Visual Media or Cultural Studies.

The successful appointee will have a record of excellence in research, with a portfolio of publications appropriate to their career stage. The appointee will provide teaching at all levels of the undergraduate curriculum, and will have a commitment to innovative approaches to teaching. The appointee will be expected to develop courses and modules for students at both first-year and Honours level which engage with aspects of Spanish culture and civilisation that go beyond the literary. The successful candidate will be expected to play a full part in the collegiate life of the subject area, of the Department, and of the School, and to undertake appropriate administrative roles. Click here for further details.

Deadline for applications: 26 October 2016.

 

Damián Ortega in Edinburgh

2016-06-Ortega

Damián Ortega

Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh
9 July – 23 October 2016

Ortega (b. 1967) is one of the new generation of Mexican artists whose sculptures focus attention on how the forces of nature, whether wind, water, arth or fire, act on the earth and affect humankind. The works in the Fruitmarket exhibition are mainly made from clay  to form waves, ‘icebergs’ or track the eroding power of a river and will introduce a major new sculpture. The exhibition will be accompanied by a new bilingual publication Damián Ortega: States of Time fully illustrating this new body of work and including texts by Adrian Forty and Sergio González Rodríguez,

CFP: Orientalism and Spain in the 19th and 20th Centuries, Edinburgh, April 2016

2015-07-AAH logo
Call for Papers:
Orientalism and Spain in the 19th and 20th Centuries
Association of Art Historians
University of Edinburgh
7-9 April 2016
Convened by Claudia Hopkins (University of Edinburgh) and Anna McSweeney (School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London)

Spain represents a unique and fertile context in which to explore attitudes to the art and culture of the Islamic world. Spain was routinely ‘orientalised’ by northern European cultures in the 19th century, as foreign visitors indulged in oriental reveries when reflecting on Spain’s Islamic past (711–1492) and admiring its ‘Moorish’ remains at the Alhambra palace in Granada, the mosque/cathedral in Cordoba, or the Giralda in Seville. For the Spaniard, however, this Islamic heritage raised potentially disorientating questions about cultural roots and national identity. Spanish attitudes to the Islamic past were further complicated by Spain’s ambivalent relations with the Islamic present in Morocco, ranging from war and conflict (1859–60) to Franco’s recruitment of Moroccans at the start of the Spanish Civil War. This session builds on recent research by historians of art, literature and culture, whose work has revealed that the European discourse on the Islamic world is much more polyphonic than traditional postcolonial theory assumed. The session invites papers that examine 19th- and 20-century visual responses to Spain’s Islamic past and Spain’s nearest ‘Orient’, Morocco, by both Spanish and non-Spanish artists across all media (architecture, fine art, illustrated books, photography, film, fashion etc.). How did artists translate Spain’s Islamic world into visual formats? How was such imagery produced, viewed, and marketed? What were the artistic, ideological, political, and social positions on which visual responses were grounded? How important were they in the formation of broader attitudes to the Islamic world?

Deadline for submission of proposals for papers: 9 November 2015.

More information and link to proposal form: Click here.