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Conference: Performing Otherness: a Postcolonial Approach to Francoist Spain Performing Otherness: a Postcolonial Approach to Francoist Spain, Edinburgh College of Art, October 26, 2018

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Photomontage by Jean Harold, sent to Picasso by Jean Cocteau and captioned, on the back: by “Picasso – Negro period”

This international symposium opens up discussion of Spanish art and culture in relation to the construction of discourses of coloniality in 20th-century Spain, especially in the Francoist period.

It attempts to identify methodological approaches that would allow us to understand the consolidation of hegemonic colonial discourses and how they continue in Spain today. This examination involves an analysis of constructs of Otherness in two directions – inwards and outwards. On the one hand, how did artists, performers, writers, or other cultural brokers, based in Spain, exoticise other cultures as well as their own culture as part of official rhetoric (e.g. state-funded exhibitions relating to colonial territories in Africa; translations of Chinese texts/images, state administration of rural Spain). On the other hand, the analysis is concerned with Spanish (self-)representation as Other within international contexts (eg. Picasso in African attire; flamenco in imagery for tourism/political campaigns; Hispanic Studies as a political contestation to the dictatorship).

Organisation: María Iñigo Clavo (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya) of the R&D Research Group “Experiences of the Political in Francoist Spain” (MINECO) with Claudia Hopkins in the School of History of Art, University of Edinburgh.

Schedule

9am – 9.30am: Registration

9.30am – 10am: Welcome and introduction, Yayo Aznar (Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia) and María Iñigo Clavo (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya)

10am – 1pm: Panel 1:  Appropriating the exotic, Chair: Paloma Gay-Blasco (University of St Andrews)

  • 10am – 10.30am: Neil Cox (University of Edinburgh), [Talk on Picasso – title tbc]
  • 10.30am – 11am: Esther Planas (University of the Arts London), Dissociative Fugue Disorder. Auto-exoticism as bio politics: Ways of questioning the production of culture during Francoism
  • 11am – 11.15am: Tea/Coffee Break
  • 11.15am – 11.45am: Francisco Aix (Universidad de Sevilla), Flamenco as a means to identity. An Andalusian perspective
  • 11.45am – 12.15pm: Alicia Fuentes Vega (Universidad Complutense Madrid), Title to be confirmed  
  • 12.15pm – 1pm: Panel discussion

2pm – 5pm: Panel 2: On the meaning of colony in Francoism, Chair: Richard Williams (University of Edinburgh)

  • 2pm – 2.30pm: Helena Miguélez-Carballeira (Bangor University), The Spanish rural subject and the Instituto Nacional de Colonización (1939-1971): A Biopolitical Perspective
  • 2.30pm – 3pm: Claudia Hopkins (University of Edinburgh), The Dream of a Spanish-Moroccan Brotherhood. Art and Exhibitions, 1936-1956
  • 3pm – 3.15pm: Tea/Coffee Break
  • 3.15pm – 3.45pm: Carles Prado Pons (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya). A triangulated alterity: China in Spain, 1880-1930
  • 3.45pm – 4.15pm: José Saval (University of Edinburgh). Latin American Boom or Boomerang: the impact of the periphery in the metropolis.
  • 4.15pm – 5pm: Panel discussion and closing remarks

Free to attend, booking required. Click here to reserve a ticket. 

Click here for more information.

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Art in Translation Special Issue: Spain and Orientalism

f-13259Art in Translation has announced the publication of a special issue on Spain and Orientalism, vol. 9:1 (2017), co-edited by Claudia Hopkins (University of Edinburgh) and Anna McSweeney (Warburg Institute).

This is the first English-language journal issue dedicated to Spanish Orientalism in art and visual culture in the 19th and 20th centuries. The peer-reviewed articles, drawn from a panel at the Association of Art Historians conference in 2016, examine Spain’s complex relationship with her Islamic past and with Morocco, through art, architecture, photography and material culture. They address a range of topics including patterns of collecting, the reproduction of Islamic art and architecture for private and public spaces, the role of Spain’s Islamic heritage in the construction of a national identity as exemplified in Spanish exhibition pavilions, the intersections between art and colonialism, and the role of Spanish art and visual culture in the wider debates about Orientalism.

Table of Contents:

Editorial: Spain and Orientalism, by Anna McSWEENEY and Claudia HOPKINS

The Arab Room of the Palacio de Cerralbo, by Ariane VARELA BRAGA

Reconstructing the Alhambra: Rafael Contreras and the Architectural Models of the Alhambra in the Nineteenth Century, by Asun GONZALEZ PEREZ

Mudéjar and the Alhambresque: Spanish Pavilions at the Universal Expositions and the Invention of a National Style, by Anna McSWEENEY

Vision, Lamentation and Nineteenth-Century Representations of the End of al-Andalus, by Oscar E. VÁZQUEZ

Allende el Estrecho (Beyond the Straits): The Photographic Gaze on the Orient in Andalusia and Morocco, by David SÁNCHEZ CANO

Visualizing ‘Moorish’ Traces within Spain: Orientalism and Medievalist Nostalgia in Spanish Colonial Photojournalism 1909-33, by Elisabeth BOLORINOS ALLARD

The Politics of Spanish Orientalism: Distance and Proximity in Tapiró and Bertuchi, by Claudia HOPKINS

Select Bibliography: Spain and Orientalism

The issue can be accessed online through Taylor and Francis Online.