Tag Archives: Visual arts

CFP: Canons and Repertoires: Constructing the Visual Arts in the Hispanic World, Durham University, 20–21 June 2019, deadline 31 March!

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The visual arts in Spain have long been haunted by the spectres of six giants: El Greco, Ribera, Velázquez, Murillo, Goya and Picasso. Still today, these canonical figures tower over all others and continue to shape the story of Spanish art, which has been traditionally told in monographic form. Although the strength of the Spanish canon has informed different disciplines (literature, aesthetics, performing arts), given the recent ‘material turn’, the prosopographical dimension of the visual arts in Spain poses a disciplinary challenge. Similarly, following the ‘global turn’, the visual arts of Iberia pose a geographical challenge, intersecting with the Mediterranean, Arabic, Latin American, British and continental European worlds. The notions of ‘Spain’ and ‘Spanish art’, therefore, are necessarily nebulous and problematic, raising a host of questions: To what extent does Spanish art exist before the establishment of Spain as a nation state? To what extent is the art of the Habsburg and Bourbon empires a Spanish art outside Spain? What is the role of Spain in the wider canon of European art? Who has exploited the visual arts of the Hispanic world, geographically, politically and intellectually? These questions ultimately point to a tension between canons and repertoires; between centres and peripheries; and between consolidating the ‘core’ and expanding the ‘remit’ of the so-called Spanish school.

This conference will explode the disciplinary, material and geographical limits of Spanish art, inaugurating the Zurbarán Centre as a critical and innovative research institution for the study of Spanish and Latin American art in the twenty-first century. Papers may challenge the canonical construction of Spanish art, which can be traced back to writings from Palomino’s Lives of the Eminent Spanish Painters and Sculptors (1724) to Stirling Maxwell’s Annals of the Artists of Spain (1848), to more recent publications by scholars in the field. Papers may also probe the chronological, geographical and material boundaries of the ‘El Greco to Goya’ survey, interrogating the ways in which academics, curators, scholars and teachers narrate this material through various platforms, including publications, museum displays, exhibitions, lectures, gallery talks and academic courses. Speakers are encouraged to address the various ‘terrains’ of Spanish art, from geographical constructions of Iberia as Europe’s frontier or edge, to exchange with all that lies beyond the Pillars of Hercules. Topics for discussion may include, but are not limited to:

  • What is ‘Spanish art’?
  • Who are the cultural stakeholders of Spanish art?
  • What are the discords between regional, national, anti-national and transnational narratives of Spanish art, for example in museum collections and displays?
  • How does Spanish art feature in diplomatic exchanges?
  • Collections of Spanish art as an ‘imprint’ of Spain, and the role of foreign collections in disseminating Spanish art as a distinct school
  • Spain at the intersection of Christian, Jewish and Islamic cultures
  • Copies, quotations and appropriations of Spanish art
  • Languages and literatures: strategies of describing, narrating and translating Spain in word and image
  • Performing ‘Spanishness’ in the arts, including music, theatre and film
  • Spanish discourses in aesthetics
  • Spanish art beyond Iberia
  • Mobility and portability of Spanish art
  • Travel and discovery: geographies, centres, peripheries and liminal spaces
  • Legacies: textual and visual responses to Spain abroad
  • Eschewing binaries: high and low, sacred and secular, medieval and renaissance
  • Writing againstthe canon: filling gaps, promoting underdogs, navigating uncharted territories

Specialists of Spanish arts, artistic communication and exchange, as well as experts of other regions are invited to discuss the role and definition of Spain in their own disciplines. Presentations may be delivered in English or Spanish. Please send paper titles and abstracts of no more than 250 words, together with a CV and 150-word biography, to Dr Edward Payne by 31 March 2019: edward.a.payne@durham.ac.uk.

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CFP: Canons and Repertoires: Constructing the Visual Arts in the Hispanic World, Durham University, 20–21 June 2019 

CANONS AND REPERTOIRES: Constructing the Visual Arts in the Hispanic World, Durham University, 20–21 June 2019 

The visual arts in Spain have long been haunted by the spectres of six giants: El Greco, Ribera, Velázquez, Murillo, Goya and Picasso. Still today, these canonical figures tower over all others and continue to shape the story of Spanish art, which has been traditionally told in monographic form. Although the strength of the Spanish canon has informed different disciplines (literature, aesthetics, performing arts), given the recent ‘material turn’, the prosopographical dimension of the visual arts in Spain poses a disciplinary challenge. Similarly, following the ‘global turn’, the visual arts of Iberia pose a geographical challenge, intersecting with the Mediterranean, Arabic, Latin American, British and continental European worlds. The notions of ‘Spain’ and ‘Spanish art’, therefore, are necessarily nebulous and problematic, raising a host of questions: To what extent does Spanish art exist before the establishment of Spain as a nation state? To what extent is the art of the Habsburg and Bourbon empires a Spanish art outside Spain? What is the role of Spain in the wider canon of European art? Who has exploited the visual arts of the Hispanic world, geographically, politically and intellectually? These questions ultimately point to a tension between canons and repertoires; between centres and peripheries; and between consolidating the ‘core’ and expanding the ‘remit’ of the so-called Spanish school.

This conference will explode the disciplinary, material and geographical limits of Spanish art, inaugurating the Zurbarán Centre as a critical and innovative research institution for the study of Spanish and Latin American art in the twenty-first century. Papers may challenge the canonical construction of Spanish art, which can be traced back to writings from Palomino’s Lives of the Eminent Spanish Painters and Sculptors (1724) to Stirling Maxwell’s Annals of the Artists of Spain (1848), to more recent publications by scholars in the field. Papers may also probe the chronological, geographical and material boundaries of the ‘El Greco to Goya’ survey, interrogating the ways in which academics, curators, scholars and teachers narrate this material through various platforms, including publications, museum displays, exhibitions, lectures, gallery talks and academic courses. Speakers are encouraged to address the various ‘terrains’ of Spanish art, from geographical constructions of Iberia as Europe’s frontier or edge, to exchange with all that lies beyond the Pillars of Hercules. Topics for discussion may include, but are not limited to:

  • What is ‘Spanish art’?
  • Who are the cultural stakeholders of Spanish art?
  • What are the discords between regional, national, anti-national and transnational narratives of Spanish art, for example in museum collections and displays?
  • How does Spanish art feature in diplomatic exchanges?
  • Collections of Spanish art as an ‘imprint’ of Spain, and the role of foreign collections in disseminating Spanish art as a distinct school
  • Spain at the intersection of Christian, Jewish and Islamic cultures
  • Copies, quotations and appropriations of Spanish art
  • Languages and literatures: strategies of describing, narrating and translating Spain in word and image
  • Performing ‘Spanishness’ in the arts, including music, theatre and film
  • Spanish discourses in aesthetics
  • Spanish art beyond Iberia
  • Mobility and portability of Spanish art
  • Travel and discovery: geographies, centres, peripheries and liminal spaces
  • Legacies: textual and visual responses to Spain abroad
  • Eschewing binaries: high and low, sacred and secular, medieval and renaissance
  • Writing againstthe canon: filling gaps, promoting underdogs, navigating uncharted territories

Specialists of Spanish arts, artistic communication and exchange, as well as experts of other regions are invited to discuss the role and definition of Spain in their own disciplines. Presentations may be delivered in English or Spanish. Please send paper titles and abstracts of no more than 250 words, together with a CV and 150-word biography, to Dr Edward Payne by 31 March 2019: edward.a.payne@durham.ac.uk.

SKIN: A ONE DAY SYMPOSIUM ON HISPANIC ARTS AND CULTURES. Friday, 22nd May 2015

FlayingSKIN: A ONE DAY SYMPOSIUM ON HISPANIC ARTS AND CULTURES

Institute of Advanced Study, Palace Green, Durham  Friday, 22 May 2015

To register for the event, please email the organizer (a.m.beresford@durham.ac.uk) indicating if you have any special dietary requirements. There is no registration fee, but all participants will be asked to complete a short impact questionnaire. There are a maximum of 20 places available.

09.30–09.40 Welcome and Introduction

09.40–10.20 Edward Payne (Meadows Museum, Dallas), ‘Skin as Subject and Surface: Flaying in the Art of Ribera, Carreño and Giordano’

10.20–11.00 Yarí Pérez Marín (Durham University), ‘Skin and Markers of Disease in the Medical Literature of Early Colonial Mexico’

11.00–11.20 Coffee

11.20–12.00 Andy Beresford (Durham University), ‘The Flaying of St Bartholomew in Early Spanish Altarpieces’

12.00–12.40 Tom Nickson (Courtauld Institute), ‘“Stuffed in the most artistic manner”: The Sacred Made Real in Medieval Castile’

12.40–13.40 Lunch

13.40–14.20 Bogdan Cornea (University of York), ‘Skin and Surfaces in Jusepe de Ribera’s Paintings of Flaying’

14.20–15.00 Lesley Twomey (Northumbria University), ‘Decorated Exteriors and Resplendent Interiors: The Ark, the Tabernacle, and the Reliquary as Figures for the Virgin Mary’s Physical and Spiritual Beauty in Late-Medieval Spain’

15.00–15.40 Piers Baker-Bates Open University), ‘Sebastiano del Piombo: The Suffering Skin between Italy and Spain’

15.40–16.00 Tea

16.00–17.00 Round Table Discussion

ARTES Malta visit: Wed 5 November – Mon 10 November 2014

ARTES is visiting Malta from 5-10 November 2014. This visit is being organised by Marjorie Trusted of the V&A (ARTES Hon Vice-President) and Giuseppe Schembri Bonaci of the University of Malta (ARTES member). The programme is detailed below and includes a symposium on Spanish Baroque Art in Malta being hosted by the Spanish Embassy.

Valetta Harbour, Malta

Valetta Harbour, Malta

ARTES Visit to Malta: 5 – 10 November 2014

Programme

Wednesday 5 November
Day: Arrival
Evening: 5.30 pm – Talk by Fr Dun Edgar Vella
The Baroque Neapolitan Crib in Malta
Followed by drinks reception and dinner

Thursday 6 November
Day Spanish Art on Malta Symposium at the Spanish Embassy
See link below for the provisional schedule:
Spanish Art on Malta Symposium – Thurs 6 Nov 2014

Malta Symposium Nov 2014

Evening Reception at the Spanish Embassy 

Friday 7 November
Day Visit to St John’s Co-Cathedral with Professor Keith Sciberras
Followed by tour of Valletta (including the Wignacourt Museum)
Lunch With transport to Mdina
Afternoon Visit to Mdina Cathedral Museum with Fr. Dun Edgar Vella
& to St Paul’s Church, Rabat
Evening Santa Caterina Church, Valletta & Lecture by Peter Vassallo
The Sojourn of Ángel de Saavedra, Duque de Rivas, in Malta (1825-30)
& the Composition of Al faro de Malta and El moro expósito

Saturday 8 November
Day 
Visit to Gozo to see churches & private collections with Mark Sagona

Sunday 9 November
Day Three cities tour
Lunch at Vittoriosa Quay
Afternoon Visit to National Museum of Fine Arts
& St Paul’s Shipwreck Church

Monday 10 November
Departure

St John's Co-Cathedral Malta

St John’s Co-Cathedral, Malta

Spanish embassy logo

1st ARTES Coll & Cortés Scholars announced

ARTES is delighted to announce the winners of the 2014 ARTES Coll & Cortés scholarships. Out of a very strong field the following awards were made:

Santa CatalinaARTES Coll & Cortés PhD Scholarship for students at a UK University

This was awarded to Kathryn Santner, a PhD candidate at the University of Cambridge, to support her study of the paintings in the Convent of Santa Catalina de Sena, in Arequipa, Peru.

 

ARTES Coll & Cortés Scholarships for PhD or post-doc students in Spain, Portugal or Latin America

This was awarded to Ana Hernández Ferreirós, a doctoral student at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, for her research on the twelfth-century bibles of San Isidoro de Leon and San Millan de la Cogolla.

ARTES Coll & Cortés Travel Scholarships

These were awarded to Costanza Beltrami, a 3rd-year undergraduate student at the Courtauld Institute, for a research trip to Spain to visit buildings associated with the fifteenth-century architect Juan Guas. Another scholarship was awarded to Matilde Grimaldi, a PhD student at the Courtauld Institute, for a research trip to Tortosa to study the city’s twelfth-century cathedral (now largely destroyed), and its treasury.

ARTES extends its warmest congratulations to the 2014 scholars, and thanks Coll & Cortés once again for their generous support.

 

 

Lecture: Kirstin Kennedy, ‘What Alfonso X’s works tell us about the dissemination of his manuscripts’

On Wednesday 28th May, at 5.30pm, Dr Kirstin Kennedy (V&A) will give the Medieval Work in Progress Seminar in the Research Forum South Room of the Courtauld Institute of Art. Open to all.

 

 

Dr Kennedy’s talk is entitled ‘What Alfonso X’s works tell us about the dissemination of his manuscripts’