Tag Archives: Reception

The Maius Masterclass: Inaugural Event with Dr Hilary Macartney, 26 June 2020, 4pm on Zoom

Image: The Maius Workshop

Click here for more information, the schedule, and registration

This series of masterclasses encourages creative dialogue between early-career and established scholars. We have invited historians of art and culture who have challenged established classifications, chronologies and geographies. Discussing texts and objects from their research, they will share experiences of investigating the Iberian and Latin American past, reflect on their academic journeys, and provide both intellectual and practical advice.

Click here for more information, the schedule, and registration

Lecture: Dr Edward Payne, ‘Le noir Valencian’: Ribera, Gautier and the French Taste for Violent Painting, Durham University, 7 February 2019

frenchsemiinar7thfeb1200x4007th February 2019, 16:00 to 17:00, Room 146, Elvet Riverside 1, Durham University

Paintings by the Spanish Baroque artist, Jusepe de Ribera (1591–1652), prompted a range of contradictory responses in the nineteenth century. Poets, travel writers, critics and artists reacted to his work, especially his striking depictions of violent subjects, at once with admiration and displeasure. In his epic poem Don Juan (1823), Lord Byron declares that ‘Spagnoletto tainted / His brush with all the blood of all the sainted’, and in 1845, Théophile Gautier published two poems on the artist, referring to Ribera as ‘le noir Valencian’, and ‘plus dur que Jupiter’. While Byron and Gautier are often quoted in the literature on the artist, scholars have been swift to dismiss these responses as ‘muddying the waters’ of Ribera’s œuvre, and thus his reception during the nineteenth century has, until recently, received scant scholarly attention.

Through a close, comparative study of Ribera’s paintings and Gautier’s poems, this lecture will explore nineteenth-century attitudes towards extreme imagery in the context of the revival of the Spanish School in France. It will provide a more contextualised and nuanced account of Ribera’s reception during the nineteenth century, and demonstrate that Gautier’s poetic responses are not, in fact, distorting, but revealing. The lecture will argue for the significance of these poems by suggesting that Gautier calls attention to the problematic relationship between the act of inflicting torture and the art of representing pain, a tension which is central to an understanding of Ribera’s violent imagery, and to the myth-making of Ribera as a ‘violent’ artist.

Click here for more information, or contact zurbaran.centre@durham.ac.uk

murilloheader

13:00 – 14:30   13:00 – 14:30   Registration and opportunity to visit the drawings by Murillo and other Spanish masters in the Courtauld Prints and Drawings Study Room (Please note: directions to the Study Room and information on the visit will be provided upon registration)

14:30   Welcome

14:35 – 15:05   Manuela Mena Marqués, Senior Curator of 18th Century Painting and Goya, Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid: “Murillo the Draughtsman”

15:05 – 15:35   Xanthe Brooke, Curator of Continental European Art, Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool: “Murillo’s Virgin and Child in Glory: The Afterlife of a Great Baroque Altarpiece”

15:35 – 16:05   Benito Navarrete Prieto, Professor, History of Art at the University of Alcala and Director of the Department of History and Philosophy: “Empathy and Prestige: The Real Reasons for Collecting Murillo’s Work in the Seville of his Patrons”

16:05 – 16:35   Tea

16:35 – 17:05   Laura Alba Carcelén, Conservation Scientist, Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid’: “At Murillo´s Workshop: Pictorial Materials and Procedures”

17:05 – 17:35   Mairi Macdonald, Birkbeck College, University of London: “Murillo and Depictions of Poverty”

17:35 – 17:55   Discussion and close

18:00 – 19:00   Drinks and tapas

19:30   Invitation to attend a free concert of Spanish Renaissance and Baroque music organised by the Instituto Cervantes in Kings College Chapel (next door to the Courtauld). Please visit this link to book tickets.

For tickets to the conference, please click here

General public £16

Students £11

 

CFP: Maius Workshop Meeting: ‘Imagining Spain and Latin America Abroad’

Short, informal papers are invited for the next meeting of The Maius Workshop, a community of graduate students and early career researchers working on Iberian and Latin American arts, histories and cultures. For more information about the group, please visit their website.

sc25548

Édouard Manet
Monk in Prayer (1865)
MFA Boston

The meeting will take place in the Research Forum, The Courtauld Institute, London WC2R 0RN on June 11 2018, 6:00–7:30pm

The theme of the meeting is ‘Imagining Spain and Latin America abroad.’ Discussion may consider exchange, trade, and the foreign reception of Spanish and Latin American art and culture.

Informal presentations should last no longer than 15 minutes.

The Maius Workshop endeavours to create a supportive environment to present new ideas and talk through problems and open questions. Collaborative research is central to the group’s ethos, and it aims to encourage dialogue rather than showcase fully-resolved material.

If you are interested in attending or presenting your work, please email maiusworkshop@gmail.com before May 15, 2018.

murilloheader

13:00 – 14:30   13:00 – 14:30   Registration and opportunity to visit the drawings by Murillo and other Spanish masters in the Courtauld Prints and Drawings Study Room (Please note: directions to the Study Room and information on the visit will be provided upon registration)

14:30   Welcome

14:35 – 15:05   Manuela Mena Marqués, Senior Curator of 18th Century Painting and Goya, Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid: “Murillo the Draughtsman”

15:05 – 15:35   Xanthe Brooke, Curator of Continental European Art, Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool: “Murillo’s Virgin and Child in Glory: The Afterlife of a Great Baroque Altarpiece”

15:35 – 16:05   Benito Navarrete Prieto, Professor, History of Art at the University of Alcala and Director of the Department of History and Philosophy: “Empathy and Prestige: The Real Reasons for Collecting Murillo’s Work in the Seville of his Patrons”

16:05 – 16:35   Tea

16:35 – 17:05   Laura Alba Carcelén, Conservation Scientist, Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid’: “At Murillo´s Workshop: Pictorial Materials and Procedures”

17:05 – 17:35   Mairi Macdonald, Birkbeck College, University of London: “Murillo and Depictions of Poverty”

17:35 – 17:55   Discussion and close

18:00 – 19:00   Drinks and tapas

19:30   Invitation to attend a free concert of Spanish Renaissance and Baroque music organised by the Instituto Cervantes in Kings College Chapel (next door to the Courtauld). Please visit this link to book tickets.

For tickets to the conference, please click here

General public £16

Students £11

 

murilloheader

13:00 – 14:30   Registration and opportunity to visit the drawings by Murillo and other Spanish masters in the Courtauld Prints and Drawings Study Room (Please note: directions to the Study Room and information on the visit will be provided upon registration)

14:30   Welcome

14:35 – 15:05   Manuela Mena Marqués, Senior Curator of 18th Century Painting and Goya, Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid: “Murillo the Draughtsman”

15:05 – 15:35   Xanthe Brooke, Curator of Continental European Art, Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool: “Murillo’s Virgin and Child in Glory: The Afterlife of a Great Baroque Altarpiece”

15:35 – 16:05   Benito Navarrete Prieto, Professor, History of Art at the University of Alcala and Director of the Department of History and Philosophy: “Empathy and Prestige: The Real Reasons for Collecting Murillo’s Work in the Seville of his Patrons”

16:05 – 16:35   Tea

16:35 – 17:05   Laura Alba Carcelén, Conservation Scientist, Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid’: “At Murillo’s Workshop: Pictorial Materials and Procedures”

17:05 – 17:35   Mairi Macdonald, Birkbeck College, University of London: “Murillo and Depictions of Poverty”

17:35 – 17:55   Discussion and close

18:00 – 19:00   Drinks and tapas

19:30   Invitation to attend a free concert of Spanish Renaissance and Baroque music organised by the Instituto Cervantes in Kings College Chapel (next door to the Courtauld). Please visit this link to book tickets

For tickets to the conference, please click here

General public £16

Students £11

 

murilloheader

13:00 – 14:30   Opportunity to visit the drawings by Murillo and other Spanish masters in the Courtauld Prints and Drawings Study Room

14:30   Welcome

14:35 – 15:05   Manuela Mena Marqués, Senior Curator of 18th Century Painting and Goya, Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid: “Murillo the Draughtsman”

15:05 – 15:35   Xanthe Brooke, Curator of Continental European Art, Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool: “Murillo’s Virgin and Child in Glory: The Afterlife of a Great Baroque Altarpiece”

15:35 – 16:05   Benito Navarrete Prieto, Professor, History of Art at the University of Alcala and Director of the Department of History and Philosophy: “Empathy and Prestige: The Real Reasons for Collecting Murillo’s Work in the Seville of his Patrons”

16:05 – 16:35   Tea

16:35 – 17:05   Laura Alba Carcelén, Conservation Scientist, Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid’: “At Murillo’s Workshop: Pictorial Materials and Procedures”

17:05 – 17:35   Mairi Macdonald, Birkbeck College, University of London: “Murillo and Depictions of Poverty”

17:35 – 17:55   Discussion and close

18:00 – 19:00   Drinks and tapas

19:30   Invitation to attend a free concert of Spanish Renaissance and Baroque music organised by the Instituto Cervantes in Kings College Chapel (next door to the Courtauld). Please visit the Instituto’s website for information on how to book:

For tickets to the conference, please click here

General public £16

Students £11

 

murilloheader

13:00 – 14:30   Opportunity to visit the drawings by Murillo and other Spanish masters in the Courtauld Prints and Drawings Study Room

14:30   Welcome

14:35 – 15:05   Manuela Mena Marqués, Senior Curator of 18th Century Painting and Goya, Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid: “Murillo the Draughtsman”

15:05 – 15:35   Xanthe Brooke, Curator of Continental European Art, Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool: “Murillo’s Virgin and Child in Glory: The Afterlife of a Great Baroque Altarpiece”

15:35 – 16:05   Benito Navarrete Prieto, Professor, History of Art at the University of Alcala and Director of the Department of History and Philosophy: “Empathy and Prestige: The Real Reasons for Collecting Murillo’s Work in the Seville of his Patrons”

16:05 – 16:35   Tea

16:35 – 17:05   Laura Alba Carcelén, Conservation Scientist, Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid’: “At Murillo’s Workshop: Pictorial Materials and Procedures”

17:05 – 17:35   Mairi Macdonald, Birkbeck College, University of London: “Murillo and Depictions of Poverty”

17:35 – 17:55   Discussion and close

18:00 – 19:00   Drinks and tapas

19:30   Invitation to attend a free concert of Spanish Renaissance and Baroque music organised by the Instituto Cervantes in Kings College Chapel (next door to the Courtauld). Please visit the Instituto’s website for information on how to book:

For tickets to the conference, please click here

General public £16

Students £11

 

New Publication: El Greco comes to America: the Discovery of a Modern Old Master (CEEH, Center for Spain in America and Frick Collection, 2017)

greco-666x800El Greco comes to America: The Discovery of a Modern Old Master, directed by Inge Reist and José Luis Colomer
Este libro es un homenaje a los soberbios ejemplos de la obra del Greco
conservados en Estados Unidos. El estilo tan personal del artista tenía
un aire de modernidad que atraía a los coleccionistas de aquel país,
gracias a lo cual los museos americanos poseen muchos de los mejores
Grecos que hay fuera de España. Once especialistas abordan el estudio
de coleccionistas particulares como Arabella Huntington, Louisine
Havemeyer, Henry Clay Frick, Peter Widener y Duncan Phillips, pero
analizan también el impacto de las exposiciones en las que pudieron
verse obras del cretense y el papel que desempeñaron artistas-asesores
como Mary Cassatt, John Singer Sargent y Roger Fry.

Partiendo de una rica documentación de archivo, en gran parte inédita
hasta ahora, los autores de este volumen demuestran el denuedo con el
que los coleccionistas americanos compitieron por las obras del Greco y
el lugar tan destacado que concedieron en sus casas a los cuadros del
cretense, que a menudo colgaron junto a otros de pintores más modernos
como Degas o Manet. Al hacerlo, y al fomentar la compra de cuadros del
Greco por parte de las instituciones públicas que financiaban, forjaron
la reputación internacional de este artista entre el público
contemporáneo, garantizando un aprecio por su estilo único que se
mantiene todavía.

SOBRE LOS DIRECTORES [10]

INGE REIST, doctora por la Universidad de Columbia, donde dio clase
durante unos años, es directora del Center for the History of
Collecting de la Frick Art Reference Library. Dirigió también el
Archivo Fotográfico de la Frick Collection y fue presidenta de la
Association of Research Institutes in Art History. Es experta en
historia del coleccionismo, tema sobre el que ha publicado trabajos y
dado conferencias en numerosos museos y congresos. Ha coeditado con Gail
Feigenbaum _Provenance: An Alternative Art History_ (2012), aunque sigue
interesándose por otras cuestiones, como prueba su «_All the World’s a
Stage: The Theater Conceit in Early Modern Italy_» para el Blackwell
Companion to Renaissance and Baroque Art (2012).

JOSÉ LUIS COLOMER es doctor en Literatura Comparada por la Universidad
de Bolonia y licenciado en Historia del Arte por la Sorbona. Actualmente
dirige el Centro de Estudios Europa Hispánica y el Center for Spain in
America. Sus investigaciones abordan las relaciones culturales entre
España e Italia en el siglo XVII a través de agentes diplomáticos y
del intercambio de regalos artísticos entre las cortes europeas y los
reyes de España, así como el segundo viaje a Roma de Velázquez y sus
vínculos con personajes italianos en la corte de Madrid. En 2012
codirigió con Inge Reist el libro Collecting Spanish Art: Spain’s
Golden Age and America’s Gilded Age.

264 páginas; 156 ilustraciones
ISBN: 978-84-15245-73-5
50 €
Until 15 December, 10% online discount, http://www.ceeh.es

CFP: Zurbarán and his Reception in Art History (Düsseldorf, January 2016)

Francisco de Zurbarán, Portrait of Santa Casilda (Museo Thyssen, Madrid)

Francisco de Zurbarán, Portrait of Santa Casilda (Museo Thyssen, Madrid)

Call for Papers:
The Discovery of the Inconspicuous: Body, Materiality and Narrativity in the Work of Francisco de Zurbarán and his Reception in Art History
Annual conference of the Carl Justi Association for the Promotion of Art Historical Cooperation with Spain, Portugal and Ibero-America, in cooperation with Museum Kunstpalast, Düsseldorf and the Department of Art History of the Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf
Museum Kunstpalast, Düsseldorf, 21–23 January 2016
Deadline for submissions: 30 September 2015

From 10 October 2015 to 31 January 2016 paintings by Francisco de Zurbarán will be shown for the first time in the German-speaking world in a monographic exhibition, organised by the Museum Kunstpalast, Düsseldorf in cooperation with the Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid. Zurbarán’s work is barely represented in German collections, and while internationally his work has been discussed from many different perspectives, there has only been a limited amount of art historical research on it in Germany.
In its annual conference the Carl Justi Association wants to bring together the broad range of approaches to Zurbarán in German scholarship and also encourage further research into his work. Possible fields of enquiry include:
Intermediality. Early Zurbarán reception already emphasised the sculptural qualities of his paintings but more recent research has shown that the interrelation of painting and sculpture in seventeenth-century Seville cannot be understood from the context of contemporary art historical discourses alone, and we should also consider techniques and workshop practices in these two genres. This perspective could be broadened by considering Zurbarán’s place in a history of piety and exploring the role that his canvases played in paraliturgy.
Another area of research would be the interplay of body, space and materiality for the perception and reception of the sacred and the divine secrets of faith in each genre.
Zurbarán’s paintings are remarkable in their way of evoking the surface texture and haptic qualities of the many different materials used, which often, for example in the garments, enter into a dynamic relationship with the bodies perceived as holy. The conference would like to offer the possibility of discussing different approaches to this phenomenon, for example from the perspective of visual culture studies, image studies, costume history and textile history but also  that of restoration.
Narrativity. Zurbarán’s tendency to focus on the essential and his ‘iconographic’ condensation of motifs have been stressed repeatedly. But his works also contain seemingly marginal details: still life elements in religious scenes, or the signs of Christ’s Passion on his body that are barely recognisable in the dark background. These elements may not reveal themselves at first sight, which is why the conference also wants to explore the role of the seemingly             inconspicuous for the perception and interpretation of Zurbarán’s paintings.
New contexts of perception and experience. Francisco de Zurbarán’s era was shaped by great upheavals in both church and state politics. We thus need to explore how art positioned itself in a society undergoing profound social and cultural change. Possible themes here include art     production, which had to address the market challenges in the New World, as well as pictorial subjects and their treatment, such as t ambivalence of the ‘nature morte’ in religious art.
Reception. Finally, the conference would like to encourage scholars to examine the rather belated recognition of Zurbarán in German art history within the broader context of the history of his critical  reception, and to ask which ideas, images and myths art historians in different countries have associated with his work.

We welcome proposals which address one or more of these themes or other fields of enquiry. The conference will be held in German, Spanish and English. Grants to assist speakers in their travel and accommodation costs may be available but this has not yet been confirmed.

Please submit your abstracts of no more than 300 words, together with a short curriculum vitae (no more than two pages), by 30 September to:
Dr Kristin Böse
Institut für Kunstgeschichte
Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf
Gebäude 23.32
Universitätsstraße 1
40225 Düsseldorf
Germany
Kristin.Boese@uni-duesseldorf.de