Tag Archives: Valencia

Opening soon: Intacta María. Política y religiosidad en la España barroca, 30 November 2017 – 8 April 2018, Museo de Bellas Artes de Valencia

alegorc3ada_de_la_virgen_inmaculada2c_atribuida_a_juan_de_roelas_28museo_nacional_de_escultura_de_valladolid29The exhibition Intacta María. Política y religiosidad en la España barroca, opening on 30 November  2017, analyses the process through which devotion to the Immaculate conception was created and popularised in early modern Spain. While the Immaculate Conception only became dogma in 1854, as early as 1616 the Spanish Monarchy became a staunch supporter of the theory, turning its defence into a national priority. In the following years, the Immaculate Conception became Spain’s most heartfelt devotion and a sign of national identity. Art played an important role in this process, amounting to what we may describe as a marketing campaign. This will be the focus of the Museo de Bellas Artes’ forthcoming exhibition, featuring more than 50 paintings, sculptures, prints and books borrowed from notable Spanish museums and churches such as the Museo Nacional de Escultura de Valladolid, the Cathedral of Seville, the Biblioteca Nacional de España, and many others.

 

Please click here for more information on the exhibition.

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Artes Coll & Cortes Scholarship Report, Encarna Montero

Here follows a report by Dr Encarna Montero Tortajada, a post-doctoral researcher from Valencia, who in 2015 was  awarded a £3000 scholarship to conduct research in the UK.

Saint George Altarpiece

St George Altarpiece, Victoria & Albert Museum

From the 7th of January 2016, I spent forty days in London conducting research on Spanish art in the United Kingdom, thanks to an ARTES scholarship granted last year. The first week was almost entirely consecrated to preparing the talk “Architectural Practice in Spain, 1370-1450: Documents, Drawings and Historiography”, delivered on the 18th of January at the Courtauld Institute. After that, I conducted my research in the Warburg Library and in the Courtauld Library, where I found new and very useful papers about several historiographical problems within my field of academic interests. Moreover, the stay was a superb opportunity to attend lectures and seminars related to medieval art, for example Mary Carruthers’ seminar on the Art of Invention in Cambridge (“Vividness, Evidence, Proof: the Role of Visions”), and Lina Bolzoni’s talk about Memory Palaces in the Renaissance at the Courtauld Institute. Besides, I was kindly invited by Nicola Jennings and Tom Nickson to join their lessons in the V&A about Spanish Medieval Art and Gothic architectural drawings, respectively. I could visit, too, the medieval collections of the British Museum and the National Gallery, and prominent architectural monuments such as Ely Cathedral and Saint Alban’s Abbey. Furthermore, in addition to the aforementioned scholars, I met researchers as Susie Nash, Barry Taylor, Rose Walker and Kirstin Kennedy, who all gave me sound advice about my work.

 

NPG 2543; Sir John Robinson by John James Napier

Sir John Charles Robinson, by John James Napier, National Portrait Gallery

The main focus of my research in London was the altarpiece of Saint George (Victoria and Albert Museum, 1217-1864), an exceptional work of art and very well preserved. The piece was bought in Paris art market in 1864, and was said to have been removed from a church of Valencia. Little more is known about its original context. In order to discover more about the circumstances of its purchase, I reviewed the files referring to Saint George’s Altarpiece in the Prints and Drawings Study Room of the V&A, as well as other documents lent by the Conservation Department of the Museum. Key information was provided by Blythe House Archives, particularly the files of Sir John Charles Robinson, John Webb and Juan Facundo Riaño. Robinson’s words on the altarpiece put its acquisition into context: Spanish medieval art had begun to be greatly appreciated in France and Britain ca. 1864, partly because of the influence of the French Empress, and partly because of the 19th century’s love affair with the exoticism of Southern Europe. Robinson’s voyages to Spain testify to this allure (exemplified by the V&A’s cast of El Pórtico de la Gloria ). Webb was summoned

Robinson Files, Blythe House

Robinson files, Blythe House, V&A

by Robinson to examine the Altarpiece of Saint George, and his diagnosis was key: the piece was deemed worthy of its asking price. The reports of Juan Facundo Riaño, who wasn’t directly involved in the issue, reveal also a whole world of antique dealers, painters, diplomats and connoisseurs operating in Spain. The reading of bibliography related to the art market in mid 19th-century Europe completed this survey of the vicissitudes of the Saint George Altarpiece. I hope that the outcome of this research will be published soon in a forthcoming paper.

 

Exhibition: Miró y el Mori el Merma, Valencia

2015-07-Mori-Merma
Miró y el Mori el Merma
Centro del Carmen, Valencia
11 June – 13 September

In 1978 Miró collaborated with the theatre company Teatre de la Claca to design, decorate and produce the masks and giant puppet figures for their production of Mori el Merma a play based on Alfred Jarry’s tyrannical Ubu figure, whom the artist associated with Franco’s reign. The production opened in Mallorca and Barcelona and subsequently toured Europe including a showing at the Riverside Studios in London. The exhibition displays for the first time since 1980 the masks and puppets, recently restored by the Instituto Valenciano de Conservación y Restauración, alongside a series of drawings and three portfolios of lithographs that Miró produced during the design process.

CFP: Religious Identities, Coexistence, Conflicts and Exchanges in the Mediterranean (7 & 8 May, Valencia)

2015-03-ReligiousIDs-CFPCFP: Religious Identities, Coexistence, Conflicts and Exchanges in the Mediterranean, 12thC – 18thC
Valencia, 7-8 May 2015

La cuestión de la “identidad” como tal, así como de la integración de las minorías quevivieron bajo un mismo marco legislativo, político y religioso es uno de los asuntos de mayor actualidad en la investigación internacional. En este congreso analizaremos, desde una perspectiva pluridisciplinar, la evolución de dicha realidad transcultural, focalizando nuestra atención en los mecanismos de integración y exclusión que sedieron durante los siglos XII al XVII en el Mediterráneo debido a la coexistencia de diversas confesiones.

Temas
• Análisis de la conformación de las identidades religiosas en el Mediterráneo.
• Espacios de convivencia.
• Inquisición, violencia y represión.
• La imagen del “otro”.
• Redes interconfesionales de solidaridad.

Ponentes invitados
Dr. Luis Bernabé Pons (Universidad de Alicante-Cátedra Unesco Islam, cultura y sociedad)
Dra. Giovanna Fiume (Università degli Studi di Palermo)
Dra. Beate Fricke (University of California, Berkeley)
Dr. Juan Carlos Ruiz Souza (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)
Dr. Maurizio Sangalli (Istituto Sangalli per la storia e le culture religiose, Florencia)
Dr. Amadeo Serra Desfilis (Universitat de València)
Dr. Antonio Urquízar Herrera. (Universidad Nacional a Distancia)

Comité científico
Dr. Joan Aliaga Morell (Universitat Politécnica de València)
Dr. Luis Arciniega García (Universitat de València)
Dr. Ximo Company Climent (Universitat de Lleida)
Dr. Simon Ditchfield (University of York)
Dra. Mercedes García Arenal (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas)
Dr. Vincenzo Lavenia (Università degli Studi di Macerata)
Dr. Enrique Soria Mesa (Universidad de Córdoba)
Dr. John Tolan (Universitè de Nantes)

Comité organizador
Organiza el grupo de investigación Identidades en conflicto: la expresión artística e identitaria de las minorías religiosas en el Reino de Valencia medieval y moderno. (ICEMM) GV/2014/048.
Miembros
Dr. Borja Franco (Universitat de València)
Dr. Felipe Jerez (Universitat de València)
Dr. Manuel Lomas (Universitat de València)
D. Bruno Pomara Saverino (Universitat de València)
Dra. Nuria Ramón (Universitat Politécnica de València)
Dña. Bárbara Ruiz-Bejarano (Universidad de Alicante)

Propuesta de comunicaciones
Se deberá presentar un texto de una extensión máxima de 400 palabras en español, inglés, italiano o francés, así como un breve resumen de la trayectoria investigadora con las principales publicaciones. El plazo máximo de entrega será 31 de marzo de 2015, siendo comunicada la aceptación el 7 de abril. Dichas propuestas se enviarán al siguiente e-mail: identidadesenconflicto@gmail.com. La extensión de la exposición oral de las comunicaciones será de 15 minutos aproximadamente. El resultado científico de las mismas será publicada en formato de libro con sistema de revisores por pares ciegos. Se podrán seguir las noticias del congreso a través de la página de Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/identidadesenconflicto

Inscripción
Estudiantes Universitarios que no presenten comunicación: 10 euros.
Profesorado o profesionales del ámbito de la cultura que no presenten comunicación: 20 euros.
En ambos casos se expedirá un certificado de asistencia si acude al 75% de las conferencias o sesiones.
Comunicante: Se fija una cuota de inscripción de 50 euros. La matrícula da derecho al libro resultante de las ponencias y comunicaciones del congreso.

Contact:
identidadesenconflicto@gmail.com
More info:
https://www.facebook.com/identidadesenconflicto
http://docciham.hypotheses.org/1283