Tag Archives: cinema

Programme and Registration Details: Canons and Repertoires: Constructing the Visual Arts in the Hispanic World, 20th–21st June 2019, Senate Suite, Durham University Castle, Durham, UK


Organised by Stefano Cracolici and Edward Payne (Zurbarán Centre for Spanish and Latin American Art, Durham University)

Free, but please register at this link: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/canons-and-repertoires-constructing-the-visual-arts-in-the-hispanic-world-registration-62569293441

The visual arts in Spain have long been haunted by the spectres of six giants: El Greco, Ribera, Velázquez, Murillo, Goya and Picasso. Still today, these canonical figures tower over all others and continue to shape the story of Spanish art, which has been traditionally told in monographic form. Although the strength of the Spanish canon has informed different disciplines (literature, aesthetics, performing arts), given the recent ‘material turn’, the prosopographical dimension of the visual arts in Spain poses a disciplinary challenge. Similarly, following the ‘global turn’, the visual arts of Iberia pose a geographical challenge, intersecting with the Mediterranean, Arabic, Latin American, British and continental European worlds. The notions of ‘Spain’ and ‘Spanish art’, therefore, are necessarily nebulous and problematic, raising a host of questions: To what extent does Spanish art exist before the establishment of Spain as a nation state? To what extent is the art of the Habsburg and Bourbon empires a Spanish art outside Spain? What is the role of Spain in the wider canon of European art? Who has exploited the visual arts of the Hispanic world, geographically, politically and intellectually? These questions ultimately point to a tension between canons and repertoires; between centres and peripheries; and between consolidating the ‘core’ and expanding the ‘remit’ of the so-called Spanish school.

This conference will explode the disciplinary, material and geographical limits of Spanish art, inaugurating the Zurbarán Centre as a critical and innovative research institution for the study of Spanish and Latin American art in the twenty-first century. Papers will challenge the canonical construction of Spanish art, which can be traced back to writings from Palomino’s Lives of the Eminent Spanish Painters and Sculptors (1724) to Stirling Maxwell’s Annals of the Artists of Spain (1848), to more recent publications by scholars in the field. Papers will also probe the chronological, geographical and material boundaries of the ‘El Greco to Goya’ survey, interrogating the ways in which academics, curators, scholars and teachers narrate this material through various platforms, including publications, museum displays, exhibitions, lectures, gallery talks and academic courses. Speakers will address the various ‘terrains’ of Spanish art, from geographical constructions of Iberia as Europe’s frontier or edge, to exchange with all that lies beyond the Pillars of Hercules.

PROGRAMME

Thursday 20 June 2019

09.30 – 10.00 Registration & Coffee
10.00 – 10.05Introduction & Welcome
10.05 – 11.20 Session 1: Historiographies
Chair: Stefano Cracolici (Durham University)
10.05 – 10.25 Why El Greco to Goya?
Edward Payne (Durham University)
10.25 – 10.45Frederic Leighton’s Vision of Spain
Véronique Gerard Powell (Sorbonne Université, Paris)
10.45 – 11.05  Nigel Glendinning and the Hispanic Research Journal: A Unique Voice in Spanish Cultural
History
Sarah Symmons (University of Essex)
11.05 – 11.20 Discussion
11.20 – 11.50 Tea & Coffee
11.50 – 12.50 Keynote Lecture:
Passion and Prejudice: Attitudes to Spanish Sculpture in Nineteenth-Century Britain
Holly Trusted (Victoria & Albert Museum, London)
13.00 – 14.00 Lunch
14.00 – 15.15 Session 2: Geographies
Chair: Edward Payne (Durham University)
14.00 – 14.20 Beyond El Greco: The Travelling Artist between Italy and Spain—Artistic Translation and the
Sixteenth-Century Hispanic Canon
Piers Baker-Bates (The Open University)
14.20 – 14.40Maestros españoles en Chile: Espacios y repertorios
Marcela Drien (Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez, Santiago de Chile)
14.40 – 15.00 Geographic Limits and the History of the Spanish Avant-Garde
Maite Barragán (Albright College, Reading PA)
15.00 – 15.15 Discussion
15.15 – 16.30Session 3: Strategies
Chair: Tom Stammers (Durham University)
15.15 – 15.35Genaro Pérez Villaamil: Navigating Stereotypes
Claudia Hopkins (University of Edinburgh)
15.35 – 15.55 Imaginary Architecture as Imagined Community: ‘The Market’ by Jenaro Pérez Villaamil
Matilde Mateo (Syracuse University)
15.55 – 16.15 Hieroglyphs of Providence: Pelegrín Clavé and Isabella I of Castile
Stefano Cracolici (Durham University)
16.15 – 16.30 Discussion
16.30 – 17.00 Tea & Coffee
17.00 – 18.00 Keynote Lecture
Canons and Repertoires in Hispanic Art: What does Stirling Maxwell have to do with them?
Hilary Macartney (University of Glasgow)

Friday 21 June 2019

9.30 – 10.00 Tea & Coffee
10.00 – 11.15 Session 4: Identities
Chair: Giovanna Capitelli (Università Roma Tre)
10.00 – 10.20 El arte español más allá de la península ibérica: ¿Qué significa ser un ‘artista español en la Nueva España’?
Luis Javier Cuesta Hernández (Universidad Iberoamericana, Ciudad de México)
10.20 – 10.40 Constructing the Monuments of the Nation: Victor Balaguer and the Struggle to Shape Monasteries as Spanishness
Josep-Maria Garcia-Fuentes (Newcastle University)
10.40 – 11.00 Thinking Spain from Barcelona: The Iconographic Repertoire of Spanish Art (1918–1922)
Lucila Mallart (Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona)
11.00 – 11.15 Discussion
11.15 – 11.45Tea & Coffee
11.45 – 13.00Session 5: Remediations
Chair: Ludmilla Jordanova (Durham University)
11.45 – 12.05 Thinking through Painting: Artistic Practice as Metaphor in the Early Modern Hispanic World
Adam Jasienski (Southern Methodist University, Dallas TX)
12.05 – 12.25 From Mimesis to Montage: Sergei Eisenstein on El Greco
Dušan Radunović (Durham University)
12.25 – 12.45 ‘Ese Velázquez sí que era un genio’: el canon del arte español y la ficción televisiva
Luis Vives-Ferrándiz Sánchez (Universitat de València)
12.45 – 13.00 Discussion
13.00 – 14.00 Lunch
14.00 – 14.20Concluding Remarks
Amaya Alzaga Ruiz (Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Madrid)
14.20 – 15.00 Roundtable Discussion
15.00 – 16.00 Refreshment

NOSOTROS: Iberian and Latin American Week, University of Liverpool, Monday 29 October–Sunday 4 November 2018

NosotrosNosOtros: Iberian and Latin American Week, University of Liverpool,
Monday 29 October–Sunday 4 November 2018

Monday 29 October

Welcome event: Día de Muertos. A celebration of Mexican traditions

Language Lounge, 4pm – 6pm

Día de Muertos is a syncretic celebration that draws heavily from indigenous Aztec and Nahua traditions and coincides with the Christian All Souls. It recognises and commemorates the dead as well as reflecting on the living. Central to this celebration is an altar with offerings that are meaningful to those who build it. This will be on display and will be explained as part of our launch.

Tuesday 30 October

Screening: El memorial del 68 (Nicolás Echevarría, 2008) with Q&A – In Spanish with English subtitles

Rendall Building, Lecture Theatre 8 5.30pm – 8pm

In collaboration with UNAM-UK Centre for Mexican Studies film series. A documentary of the student protests and the government’s brutal response in the lead up the Olympics hosted by Mexico in October 1968. It attempts to bear witness to the events and fill in some of the historical gaps. The screening will be introduced by Dr Niamh Thornton, UoL, and will be followed by a Q&A.

Taster: Galician Language and Culture

Rendall Building, Seminar Room 3 12pm – 1pm

This will introduce you to the history, language and culture of Galicia, from its origins to the present day.

Workshop: Language and Power with Laia Darder (Sheffield Hallam University)

Rendall Building, Seminar Room 4 11am – 12pm

The aim of this workshop is to uncover ways in which language and power interact in the Hispanic world, by looking at different languages and their status.

Paula Rego’s etchings display at the Walker Art Gallery

Walker Art Gallery, 1pm – 4pm

Guided visit to the Paula Rego’s etchings in the Walker Art Gallery. This event is fully booked.

Wednesday 31 October

Roger Wright’s Vintage Radio Show: Live Requests from Hispanic Studies Staff and Students

Language Lounge, 12pm – 2pm

Live requests from Hispanic Studies staff and students.

Workshop: Music composition with Guiem Soldevila

Rendall Building, Lecture Theatre 5 1pm – 2pm

Reflection on the creation of songs: from the their first inspiration to the final product.

Salsa Class

Flexible Teacing Space, 502 Teaching Hub, 3pm – 4pm

Come and enjoy this unique ‘Salsa’ and ‘Merengue’ class. From beginners to improvers. All welcome.

European Film Agencies and Public Policies by Susana de la Sierra

Rendall Building, Seminar Room 6 4pm – 5pm

Talk delivered by Former Director General of the Spanish Film Institute Susana de la Sierra.

Concert: Guiem Soldevila

The Caledonia, 6.30pm – 7.30pm

The singer-songwriter will sing his own songs and perform versions of poets in Catalan.

Thursday 1 November

Conversation with Juan Gómez-Jurado (Peers Visiting Writer 2018)

Management School Seminar Room 5, 11am – 12.30pm

Juan Gómez-Jurado is a writer and journalist with a wide-ranging career in media and several best sellers. There will be a Q&A session where he will talk about his professional career and reveal the intricacies of his novels.

Screening of A Fábrica de Nada (Pedro Pinho, 2017) with Q&A — in Portuguese with English subtitles

Rendall Building, Lecture Theatre 6 6pm – 9.30pm

Ana Reimão, Lecturer in Portuguese, will introduce this multi-award winning film (including the 2017 FIPRESCI – Film Critics Prize at Cannes) and lead a Q&A with the audience and special guests.

Friday 2 November

Twitter Micro Story Competition

This year´s Twitter competition theme is NosOtros. We are looking for stories reflecting on multiculturalism. Each micro story should include #IBLAW18. We welcome stories written in any of the following Iberian Languages: Basque, Catalan, Portuguese and Spanish.

Seminar: Lobak (Grandchildren): preserving the memory of the bombing of Gernika two generations after — in Basque with English subtitles

Rendall Building, Seminar Room 10 12pm – 2pm

Two members of Lobak, grandchildren of those who suffered the bombing in 1937, will talk us through their aims and the screening of the documentary Gernika. Markak (2016).

Screening: Where do you draw the line? (Joseph Wordsworth, 2016) and Q&A with Joseph Wordsworth (director) and Mike Smith (producer)

Rendall Building, Lecture Theatre 1 2pm – 4pm

In this documentary, Liverpool graduates investigate the impact of the oil industry in Ecuador. The director and producer will tell us how they went about making the documentary.

Sunday 4 November

Screening of A Cidade onde envelheço (Marília Rocha, 2016) — in Portuguese with English subtitles

FACT, 3.30pm – 5pm

‘A living painting of Brazil that almost literally drags the audience into the narrow streets of the Belo Horizonte’ — Cineuropa.

With actress Francisca Manuel in attendance for a Q&A. Tickets available from http://www.fact.co.uk

Mexico 1968 Documentary Series, Instituto Cervantes, London, 02/10/2018 to 23/10/2018

Memorial del 68
1968 is a turning point for many countries that experienced the effects of the desire for revolution of young people, who had been born after the Second World War and did not feel the commitment of historical debt to those events and the type of life that was founded after. The Mexican case was especially painful because the student and social claims were violently repressed by the state forces that ended in what is known as the Tlatelolco massacre. On October 2 1968, more than three hundred people were killed by the army. This bloody response volatilized the desire for change and led to the start of the Olympics in Mexico, which took place between October 12 and 27, making Mexico a place visited by athletes from all over the world.
The programme will be introduced with a documentary by director Nicolás Echeverría, which recovers the voice of its protagonists, the informative display of the events and some conclusions and interpretations about them, thirty years later. Memorial del 68 allows us to understand the complexity of this year in which young Mexicans tried to change the world. Other documentary films complete the programme, which will be extended over four evenings in October, always followed by conversations with the public, a collaboration between the Institute of Mexican Studies / UNAM in London and the Cervantes Institute in London.
For more information about events in the series, click here.

Conference: Digital Imaginaries of the South: Stories of Belonging and Uprooting in Hispanic Cinemas

maxresdefaultInternational Film Conference (IV TECMERIN Academic Meeting): Digital Imaginaries of the South: Stories of Belonging and Uprooting in Hispanic Cinemas, October 18-20, 2017, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid / Casa de América (Madrid)

Over the past twenty years, digital technology has become the standard in the film production, circulation, and consumption processes. Within this context, Hispanic cinemas have undergone deep changes, both within the countries with an established cinematic tradition, as well as in those that, due to several reasons, had not developed a robust cinematography throughout the 20th century. The analogue paradigm became deeply contested and a new digital framework, which was widely discussed by institutions, film critics, and academics, emerged. This moment coincides with the widespread generalization of national and transnational neoliberal policies that, far from backing diversity, have increased the gap between those “connected” and those “disconnected” (to draw upon Néstor García Canclini’s term); a gap also experienced by those that, even if connected, still occupy subaltern positions.
The speeding of these processes has resulted in an increase of mobility, at work both in the geographical displacement of film professionals and in the emergence of new narrative models that deal with questions of belonging and uprooting, springing precisely from these experiences of displacement. The cinemas of the Global South, and, most specifically, Hispanic cinemas, have actively taken part in these processes, ultimately playing a relevant role in terms of narrative and aesthetic models, and the production, circulation and consumption of film.
Following the main research axes of the R+D project “Transnational relations in Hispanic digital cinemas: the axes of Spain, Mexico, and Argentina” (CSO2014-52750-P), the International Conference Digital Imaginaries of the South: Stories of Belonging and Uprooting in Hispanic Cinemas conference will discuss these themes:
  • The representation of migrations, displacements, exile, and diaspora.
  • Transnational flows of cultural, economic, and human capital in the production and circulation of cinema.
  • The reconfiguration of the regional, national, and transnational Hispanic interactions within the new century.
  • Public discourses and film policies within the region.
  • Hybridization and identity in the narratives on colonization, decolonization, and revolutionary processes.
  • Activism and digital praxis.
  • Genres, authors, stars.
  • Film cultures and cinephilia: festivals, publications, and digital platforms.
  • Minor cinemas: indigenismo, experimental, and/or militant cinemas.
  • Historiographic, theoretical, and methodological problems of so-called Hispanic, Iberian, and Latin American cinemas.