Tag Archives: iberian

Recording of BSR Online Lecture: The Iberian and the Other in early modern Rome, with Piers Baker-Bates and James W. Nelson Novoa

In case you missed it, the BSR has shared a recording of last week’s talk by Piers Baker-Bates and James W. Nelson Novoa, The Iberian and the Other in early modern Rome.

BSR Online Lecture: The Iberian and the Other in early modern Rome, TOMORROW, Wednesday 3 June, 18.00–19.30 CET (17.00 UK time)

Click here to register, places are limited (NB 17.00 UK time)

From the British School at Rome:

We are delighted to launch this series of #BSROnlineLectures for all our friends and followers and in the hope of making new ones. Thanks go to all of those who have agreed to contribute to this first series and to colleagues at the BSR who have pulled the series together with such skill and speed. Although we cannot gather here in Rome, we take consolation in coming together online. – Stephen Milner, Director

For different communities, at different times and for different reasons, Rome has always formed an important locus; this discussion will focus on one particular such early modern group.  As the sixteenth-century progressed into the seventeenth, many individual Spanish and Portuguese had made their way to Rome, not only because of its geo-political significance, but also because for a large minority of them it offered a freedom of action that was unobtainable in their own countries. These were the Conversos, Iberians of Jewish descent, who were being gradually and effectively excluded from playing a role in church and state in Spain and Portugal, two countries that were briefly united from 1580. Drawing on our research in Rome, undertaken as historian and art historian respectively, we shall discuss the kind of lives these men (and occasionally women) were able to make for themselves in Rome, what roles they played there, and their importance, out of scale to their number, as patrons of the visual arts both at home and abroad, ranging from El Greco to Velazquez.

Piers Baker-Bates is currently a Visiting Research Associate at The Open University, United Kingdom, having previously been a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow at the same institution. He is also chair of ARTES, the Iberian & Latin American Visual Culture Group. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge in March 2006 and has since held fellowships at a number of institutions, including the British School at Rome and the Dutch Institute in Florence and was an Ailsa Mellon Bruce Visiting Senior Fellow at CASVA in Autumn 2019. This was for his new project: ‘In the Spanish Fashion: Italian Material Culture and Spanish Devotional Practice in the Sixteenth Century’. His book on Sebastiano del Piombo, Sebastiano del Piombo and the World of Spanish Rome was published in September 2016, while articles on Sebastiano have appeared in both edited collections and in journals.  He has also co-authored two edited volumes, The Spanish Presence in Sixteenth-Century Italy: Images of Iberia, with Dr Miles Pattenden, which was published by Ashgate, supported by the CEEH, in January 2015 and “Un nuovo modo di colorire in pietra”: Paintings on Stone and Material Innovation, with Dr Elena Calvillo, which was published by Brill in March 2018. More recently he has contributed an essay and entries to the catalogue of the National Gallery, London, exhibition, Sebastiano del Piombo and Michelangelo, which ran from March to June 2017 and the Uffizi, Florence, exhibition, Spagna e Italia in Dialogo nell’Europa dell Cinquecento, which ran from February to May 2018.

James W. Nelson Novoa is Associate Professor in the department of Modern Languages and Literatures and Medieval and Renaissance studies at the University of Ottawa (Canada). He received his doctorate in Spanish philology from the University of Valencia in Spain in 2003 under the direction of Professor Julio Alonso Asenjo, with a European thesis co-directed by Professor Michele Luzzati of the University of Pisa. He was a postdoctoral fellow of the Foundation for Science and Technology of Portugal (2006–10) and (2011–14). Between 2014 and 2015 he was a researcher in the research project funded by the European Research Council and led by Professor Yosef Kaplan at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem: a transitional diaspora: cultural and religious changes in the Sephardic western communities during the period Modern, Faculty of Humanities, Hebrew University. He is the author of the book Being the Nação in the Eternal City: Portuguese New Christian Lives in Sixteenth Century Rome, Peterborough: Baywolf Press, 2014, of more than 30 peer-reviewed articles and 25 book chapters. Among his areas of academic interest are Italo-Iberian cultural relations in the modern period and the New Christian diaspora in Italy in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

NOSOTROS: Iberian and Latin American Week, University of Liverpool, Monday 29 October–Sunday 4 November 2018

NosotrosNosOtros: Iberian and Latin American Week, University of Liverpool,
Monday 29 October–Sunday 4 November 2018

Monday 29 October

Welcome event: Día de Muertos. A celebration of Mexican traditions

Language Lounge, 4pm – 6pm

Día de Muertos is a syncretic celebration that draws heavily from indigenous Aztec and Nahua traditions and coincides with the Christian All Souls. It recognises and commemorates the dead as well as reflecting on the living. Central to this celebration is an altar with offerings that are meaningful to those who build it. This will be on display and will be explained as part of our launch.

Tuesday 30 October

Screening: El memorial del 68 (Nicolás Echevarría, 2008) with Q&A – In Spanish with English subtitles

Rendall Building, Lecture Theatre 8 5.30pm – 8pm

In collaboration with UNAM-UK Centre for Mexican Studies film series. A documentary of the student protests and the government’s brutal response in the lead up the Olympics hosted by Mexico in October 1968. It attempts to bear witness to the events and fill in some of the historical gaps. The screening will be introduced by Dr Niamh Thornton, UoL, and will be followed by a Q&A.

Taster: Galician Language and Culture

Rendall Building, Seminar Room 3 12pm – 1pm

This will introduce you to the history, language and culture of Galicia, from its origins to the present day.

Workshop: Language and Power with Laia Darder (Sheffield Hallam University)

Rendall Building, Seminar Room 4 11am – 12pm

The aim of this workshop is to uncover ways in which language and power interact in the Hispanic world, by looking at different languages and their status.

Paula Rego’s etchings display at the Walker Art Gallery

Walker Art Gallery, 1pm – 4pm

Guided visit to the Paula Rego’s etchings in the Walker Art Gallery. This event is fully booked.

Wednesday 31 October

Roger Wright’s Vintage Radio Show: Live Requests from Hispanic Studies Staff and Students

Language Lounge, 12pm – 2pm

Live requests from Hispanic Studies staff and students.

Workshop: Music composition with Guiem Soldevila

Rendall Building, Lecture Theatre 5 1pm – 2pm

Reflection on the creation of songs: from the their first inspiration to the final product.

Salsa Class

Flexible Teacing Space, 502 Teaching Hub, 3pm – 4pm

Come and enjoy this unique ‘Salsa’ and ‘Merengue’ class. From beginners to improvers. All welcome.

European Film Agencies and Public Policies by Susana de la Sierra

Rendall Building, Seminar Room 6 4pm – 5pm

Talk delivered by Former Director General of the Spanish Film Institute Susana de la Sierra.

Concert: Guiem Soldevila

The Caledonia, 6.30pm – 7.30pm

The singer-songwriter will sing his own songs and perform versions of poets in Catalan.

Thursday 1 November

Conversation with Juan Gómez-Jurado (Peers Visiting Writer 2018)

Management School Seminar Room 5, 11am – 12.30pm

Juan Gómez-Jurado is a writer and journalist with a wide-ranging career in media and several best sellers. There will be a Q&A session where he will talk about his professional career and reveal the intricacies of his novels.

Screening of A Fábrica de Nada (Pedro Pinho, 2017) with Q&A — in Portuguese with English subtitles

Rendall Building, Lecture Theatre 6 6pm – 9.30pm

Ana Reimão, Lecturer in Portuguese, will introduce this multi-award winning film (including the 2017 FIPRESCI – Film Critics Prize at Cannes) and lead a Q&A with the audience and special guests.

Friday 2 November

Twitter Micro Story Competition

This year´s Twitter competition theme is NosOtros. We are looking for stories reflecting on multiculturalism. Each micro story should include #IBLAW18. We welcome stories written in any of the following Iberian Languages: Basque, Catalan, Portuguese and Spanish.

Seminar: Lobak (Grandchildren): preserving the memory of the bombing of Gernika two generations after — in Basque with English subtitles

Rendall Building, Seminar Room 10 12pm – 2pm

Two members of Lobak, grandchildren of those who suffered the bombing in 1937, will talk us through their aims and the screening of the documentary Gernika. Markak (2016).

Screening: Where do you draw the line? (Joseph Wordsworth, 2016) and Q&A with Joseph Wordsworth (director) and Mike Smith (producer)

Rendall Building, Lecture Theatre 1 2pm – 4pm

In this documentary, Liverpool graduates investigate the impact of the oil industry in Ecuador. The director and producer will tell us how they went about making the documentary.

Sunday 4 November

Screening of A Cidade onde envelheço (Marília Rocha, 2016) — in Portuguese with English subtitles

FACT, 3.30pm – 5pm

‘A living painting of Brazil that almost literally drags the audience into the narrow streets of the Belo Horizonte’ — Cineuropa.

With actress Francisca Manuel in attendance for a Q&A. Tickets available from http://www.fact.co.uk

Workshop: New Work on Books and Readers in the Spanish Speaking World, The Warburg Institute, London, 20 April 2018

 

On 20 April 2018, the Warburg Institute (in conjunction with the Cervantes Institute) will host an event on books and readers in the Spanish-speaking world, with the theme ‘The Book as World, the World as Book’. The day will culminate in a conversation between Alberto Manguel, Director of the National Library of Argentina, and Bill Sherman, Director of the Warburg.

 

 

Programme

Workshop: 2:00-5:30

Keynote and Reception: 6.00-8.00

2:00-3:00: WORKSHOP

Matthew Coneys (postdoctoral fellow, Institute of Modern Languages Research, University of London): Reorienting the East: Paratextual Developments in C16th Spanish Editions of Marco Polo and John Mandeville 

Marta Mansila Martín (PhD candidate, Universidad Complutense Madrid): ‘The world is a book and those who do not travel read only one page’: Cities and travels in Literature

3:00-4:00: WORKSHOP

Alexandra Nowosiad (PhD candidate, King’s College London): Aiming the Spanish Canon: Printing [inter]national Literature in the Habsburg Low Countries

Professor Linda Newson (Director, Institute of Latin American Studies, University of London): Medical books, apothecaries and the practice of medicine in early colonial Lima, Peru

4:00-4:30: TEA

4:30-5:30: WORKSHOP

Edward Wilson-Lee (Director of Studies, Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge): Life in the Library: Hernando Colón and the Universe of Books

Roberto Casazza (Head of Research, National Library of Argentina): Warburg and the celestial sphere: some new ideas on an old topic

5:30-6:00: BREAK

6:00-7:00: KEYNOTE

Alberto Manguel (Director, National Library of Argentina), in conversation with Bill Sherman (Director, The Warburg Institute)

7:00-8:00: RECEPTION sponsored by the Cervantes Institute

Attendance is free of charge. To book please click here

 

Job: Curator for Latin American, Iberian, and Latino Studies, New York Public Library

new-york-public-library-nyplThe New York Public Library is seeking to appoint a Curator for Latin American, Iberian, and Latino Studies. Click here for more information and how to apply.

With a collection that exceeds 46 million items, and a mission to advance knowledge and inspire lifelong learning, the New York Public Library stands as one of the world’s great public research libraries. Its four research centers provide opportunities for engagement with in-depth and unique collections, inspirational reading rooms, exhibitions, programs, and a range of research services.

NYPL’s collections on Latin America, Iberia, and the Hispanic experience in the United States constitute an international resource of considerable importance, measured by the depth and variety of the research materials held, and the large numbers of unique and scarce materials in the collections. The Latin American collections span the history of the region from the earliest rarities to present-day publications and are rich in primary source documents, literary texts, ephemera, and many other resources that serve both the scholar and student. Collections on Spain and Portugal are equally extensive, with particular strengths in literature and history, including manuscripts and rare books from the Golden Age through the Age of Discovery and the Spanish and Portuguese colonial period in the Americas. Building on these historic strengths, the Library has continued to document the history and literature of Latinos in the United States, particularly in New York City. The broad scope of NYPL’s collecting over the years has resulted in a collection that provides extraordinary opportunities for interdisciplinary research across the full range of humanities and social science topics, and, consequently, within each of its four research centers.

The Curator for Latin American, Iberian, and Latino Studies provides essential leadership in the development, management, and promotion of the Library’s research collections in these areas. Based within the Collections and Research Services department, which is responsible for establishing a unified strategic vision for NYPL’s Research Collections, the Curator works collaboratively with staff across the Research Libraries to coordinate the development of the collection and the delivery of research services that help position the Library as a vital resource to support learning, creativity, scholarship, and enterprise.

 

The Curator will provide strong and effective subject expertise and leadership in developing and promoting the Library’s collections documenting Latin American, Iberian, and Latino culture, serving as the primary spokesperson for the collection, and undertaking activities that advance expanded use and other strategic goals.

 In support of teaching, learning, and scholarship, the Curator will contextualize the collections in a variety of ways, including through exhibitions and publications, and will facilitate digital humanities and other scholarly projects, and collaborate on the development of public programming and educational resources.  The Curator is responsible for raising awareness of the collections and cultivating new communities of users, including a supportive donor base. The Curator will actively engage in fundraising activities to support the needs of the collection, fellowships for researchers, and new initiatives.

 Drawing on an understanding of the collection’s historical strengths, its use, and scholarly trends, the Curator will plan for, communicate, and implement strategies to build and shape the collections, and will investigate and make specific recommendations for special collections acquisitions across the Library, including the cultivation and pursuit of major new archival acquisitions.

The Curator will maintain and strengthen existing institutional partnerships and identify and initiate opportunities to collaborate on new approaches to building collections and promoting their use to both a national and international audience.

  • Promotes scholarly, educational, and general use of the collections in collaboration with divisions across the Research Libraries, in particular, the Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books Division, the Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, and the Library for the Performing Arts
  • Participates in the ongoing evaluation and assessment of the collections to identify and build on collection strengths
  • Identifies and makes recommendations for the acquisition of special collections. Explores new areas for further development of the collection and cultivates potential donors of materials; manages an acquisitions budget; coordinates a collaborative team approach for ongoing development of the general research collections
  • Actively engages with researchers by providing consultative services; cultivates and builds strong relationships with the academic community through classes, outreach, and strategic partnerships
  • Works closely with the Development staff on fundraising activities by identifying new opportunities, cultivating donor relationships, and preparing grant proposals, and other reports
  • Identifies, evaluates, and prioritizes materials for digitization initiatives and helps facilitate the use of digital collections
  • Collaborates with the Exhibition staff on the preparation of exhibitions that highlight the collections; develops thematic narratives, selects materials, prepares interpretive materials, and supporting publications
  • Keeps abreast of the changing needs of researchers in the field, as well as emerging trends in research libraries, higher education, and humanities and social science scholarship in general
  • Establishes a record of participation in and contributions to the profession by serving on committees and representing the Library at professional organizations, conferences, and various public meetings
 Managerial/ Supervisory Responsibilities
  • Evaluates and makes selections of collection materials in languages other than English, in particular, special collections, including archives, rare books, and other formats.
  • Engages in fundraising and donor relations.
  • Develops concept and content for exhibitions.
  • Prepares scholarly articles and other interpretive materials for publication; prepares donor reports and grant applications.
  • Analyzes and prioritizes opportunities for collaboration in outreach and digitization projects.

Key Competencies

  • Accountability and Professionalism – Demonstrates enthusiasm for and commitment to the position and accepts responsibility for personal actions.
  • Customer Service – Commits to meeting the expectations of internal and external customers.Listens and responds effectively to customer questions; resolves customer problems to the customer’s satisfaction; respects all internal and external customers.
  • Collaboration and Teamwork – Supports a positive team environment in which members participate, respect and cooperate with each other to receive desired results.
  • Job-Specific Knowledge and Skills – Plans, prioritizes, and organizes work effectively to produce measurable results; keeps current with and effectively applies new work methods, skills and technologies to complete work.
 Minimum Qualifications
  • Ph.D. in topic related to Latin American history or Hispanic literary studies, or an MLS from an ALA-accredited program and advanced relevant subject degree.
  • Minimum of five years of relevant professional experience in an academic or research library, or cultural organization setting or equivalent combination of education and experience.
  •  

    Excellent oral, written, and interpersonal skills, including the ability to speak and write effectively in both English and Spanish.

  • Fluency in English and Spanish.
  • Demonstrated knowledge of current practices and emerging trends in humanities and social sciences scholarship and research libraries in general.
  • Successfully demonstrated experience in public speaking, as well as teaching and instruction that promotes the use of primary source documents.
  • Successfully demonstrated ability to work effectively in a collaborative team environment.
  • Demonstrated knowledge of special collections, including archival research.
  • Record of professional engagement and contribution, such as research, publication, and involvement in pertinent professional and scholarly organizations.
  • Successfully demonstrated analytical skills and familiarity with various assessment methodologies.

Preferred Qualifications

  • Working knowledge of Portuguese and at least one other Western European language.
  • Familiarity with library preservation practices.
  • Experience with the preparation and curation of exhibitions.