Tag Archives: Literature

Call for Papers: Iberian (In)tolerance (8 November: London)

la_expulsic3b3n_en_el_puerto_de_denia-_vicente_mostre

Paper proposals are being accepted for “Iberian (In)tolerance: Minorities, Cultural Exchanges, and Social Exclusion in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Era,” an LAHP Funded Postgraduate Students-led Conference to be held at Senate House, Bedford Room 37, University College, London.

Keynotes speakers include Prof. Trevor Dadson (Queen Mary University) and Prof. Alexander Samson (UCL)
Submission deadline: 20 June 2018

During the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, minorities in the Iberian peninsula experienced both peaceful coexistence and, at times, violent intolerance. But despite restrictions, persecutions, and forced conversions, extensive cultural production and exchange among Jews, Christians and Muslims defined the life in towns and cities across the centuries, particularly in Al-Andalus. In this context of religious (in)tolerance, the question of limpieza de sangre (blood purity) played an important role in preventing newly converted Christians from occupying high social positions. Recent approaches have highlighted how the question of limpieza de sangre was not only a matter of anti-Judaism or hostility towards Jews and Moors, but was also driven by personal enmity, ambition, and political interest. Also relevant are a series of political decisions concerning minorities, such as conversos or moriscos, which appeared in the two first decades of the seventeenth century and deeply affected the social climate of the time. This is reflected in literary works from the period, when a number of prominent pieces dealt directly with the issues raised by the political reforms. While some of the decisions are very well studied, such as the expulsion of the moriscos in 1609 and 1610, others such as the issue of the Pardons, in which the both Duke of Lerma and the Count-Duke of Olivares were involved, are less well known. It is clear that these circumstances affected the lives of many authors, their poetic trajectories and determined their voices and their works.
We invite proposals for papers in English (15-20 minutes) that explore the relationships among Jews, Christians and Muslims in the Iberian Peninsula from the Middle Ages to the 17th century and how these relationships changed over time, as represented in literary works that mirrored and were influenced by the particular socio-political dynamics of the period.
Possible topics include, but are not limited to:
• Literature and minorities: Conversos, New Christians, MarranosMoriscos.
• Literature and tolerance, convivencia
, cultural exchanges.
• Literature and legality: statutes of limpieza de sangre (blood purity), blood libel, Pardons of 1609 and 1627, Duke of Lerma, Duke of Olivares.
• Literature beyond the Iberian Peninsula, Spanish identity in France, the Netherlands, Portugal, etc.

Send your proposal here

Candidates will be notified by the 15th of July 2018.
If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact us here: iberianintolerance@gmail.com.

Organisers:
• Roser López Cruz (King’s College London)
• Virginia Ghelarducci (School of Advanced Study)

Advertisements

Workshop: New Work on Books and Readers in the Spanish Speaking World, The Warburg Institute, London, 20 April 2018

 

On 20 April 2018, the Warburg Institute (in conjunction with the Cervantes Institute) will host an event on books and readers in the Spanish-speaking world, with the theme ‘The Book as World, the World as Book’. The day will culminate in a conversation between Alberto Manguel, Director of the National Library of Argentina, and Bill Sherman, Director of the Warburg.

 

 

Programme

Workshop: 2:00-5:30

Keynote and Reception: 6.00-8.00

2:00-3:00: WORKSHOP

Matthew Coneys (postdoctoral fellow, Institute of Modern Languages Research, University of London): Reorienting the East: Paratextual Developments in C16th Spanish Editions of Marco Polo and John Mandeville 

Marta Mansila Martín (PhD candidate, Universidad Complutense Madrid): ‘The world is a book and those who do not travel read only one page’: Cities and travels in Literature

3:00-4:00: WORKSHOP

Alexandra Nowosiad (PhD candidate, King’s College London): Aiming the Spanish Canon: Printing [inter]national Literature in the Habsburg Low Countries

Professor Linda Newson (Director, Institute of Latin American Studies, University of London): Medical books, apothecaries and the practice of medicine in early colonial Lima, Peru

4:00-4:30: TEA

4:30-5:30: WORKSHOP

Edward Wilson-Lee (Director of Studies, Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge): Life in the Library: Hernando Colón and the Universe of Books

Roberto Casazza (Head of Research, National Library of Argentina): Warburg and the celestial sphere: some new ideas on an old topic

5:30-6:00: BREAK

6:00-7:00: KEYNOTE

Alberto Manguel (Director, National Library of Argentina), in conversation with Bill Sherman (Director, The Warburg Institute)

7:00-8:00: RECEPTION sponsored by the Cervantes Institute

Attendance is free of charge. To book please click here

 

Introducing the Maius Workshop

Morgan Beatus Angel Sun Rev 19The Maius Workshop is an interdisciplinary group that brings together graduate students and early career scholars dealing with Hispanic art (broadly considered to include literature, theatre, music, etc.) and history from the Middle Ages to the Early Modern Period. The aim of the Maius Workshop is to encourage dialogue among specialists in different stages of their academic life and to provide a forum for discussing methods of information gathering and research news. The group is kindly supported by ARTES.

The workshop is named after the tenth-century painter of the Morgan Beatus manuscript as it wishes to create an interdisciplinary space where scholars of art and history can interact. Through a series of reading group meetings, the Workshop aims to bring together young researchers tackling the study of Hispanic culture and history and to create a strong network of specialists of Medieval and Early Modern Iberia and Latin America.

Thanks to the new connections that the group will create, the meetings will develop current research rather than present finished projects. The group’s activities are directed to the diffusion of the interest in Iberian and Latin American cultural creations, with the long-term aim of establishing a permanent community open to all students of Hispanic art and history.

The Maius Workshop’s first meeting will take place on Monday 16 October at 6 pm at the Warburg Institute. This will be an informal meeting and an opportunity to meet postgraduate researchers with similar interests, to discuss how these interests can be drawn together in a reading group setting. The meeting is open to MA, PhD and early career researchers. Refreshments will be provided.

If you are interested in the activities of this research group or would like to attend the meeting, please fill in this form

Call for Papers: ‘Representations of Violence and Ethics in Ibero-American Cultures’

Conference to be held on Friday 9th May 2014 at the University of Manchester.
For further information please see: http://conferencerveiac.wordpress.com/
We invite colleagues to send an abstract (max. 300 words) for a twenty-minute paper, along with a brief biographical note, by Moday 31st March 2014 to conference.rveiac@gmail.com.
Convenors: Ignacio Aguiló (ignacio.aguilo@manchester.ac.uk) and Miquel Pomar-Amer (miquel.pomar-amer@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk)
This conference is generously supported by Language-Based Area Studies, School of Arts, Languages and Cultures (University of Manchester).
_______________
This international conference aims to examine the way in which literature and the arts have represented violence in Latin America and the Iberian Peninsula since the 1960s, with a particular interest in the ethical aspects that such a representation entails. Our aim is to analyse how ethics and aesthetics interact in the portrayal of traumatic events. How can artistic representations contribute to processes of mourning? Does art contribute to the perpetuation and trivialisation of violence? Where are the limits of the morally acceptable? What is the role of artistic representations in the face of atrocity?
All of these questions are particularly relevant considering that 2014 marks the commemoration of the tenth anniversary of the Atocha bombings in Madrid and the twentieth anniversary of the attack on the AMIA bombing that targeted the Jewish community in Buenos Aires.
Proposals are invited for papers which explore some of these suggested topics – although they are not exclusive:
– Mourning and post-traumatic reactions
– Monuments and commemorations
– Modes of representation: the abject, the mythical, the allegorical, the grotesque, the spectacular
– Racial and religious-based violence
– Gender violence
– Violence and parody/irony
– Violence and reception studies
– Violence and consent
– Forgetting/forgiving
– ‘Unethical’ representations: challenges to the ethical constraints