Category Archives: Uncategorized

Featured Exhibition: Murillo: The Prodigal Son Restored, Hugh Lane Room, National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin, until 30 August 2020

Six remarkable paintings by one of the most celebrated painters of the Spanish Golden Age, Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (1617–1682), have been conserved and researched at the National Gallery of Ireland. They depict the parable of the Prodigal Son. Fascinating details uncovered during the conservation project and a number of related prints will be displayed alongside the series, revealing the secrets of the artistic process of this master storyteller.

Click here for more information.

Generously supported by the Blavatnik Family Foundation

Curators| Muirne Lydon and Dr Aoife Brady

Murillo Study Day, National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin, 28 February 13.30–17.30

This event will feature an afternoon of presentations and a special exhibition preview in celebration of the opening of Murillo: The Prodigal Son Restored at the National Gallery of Ireland.

Showcasing a unique series of works by one of the most celebrated artists of the Spanish Golden Age, Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (1617-1682), this in-focus exhibition explores themes of sin, repentance and forgiveness across six remarkable canvases. Donated to the National Gallery of Ireland by the Beit family in 1987, the six works have not been displayed together publicly for several decades. Murillo: The Prodigal Son Restored will celebrate the recent conservation of the series, which has revived the splendour of Murillo’s colours, brushwork, and mastery of narrative.

12pm – 1.15pmExhibition preview (Present your ticket for admission) Hugh Lane Room, Beit Wing, Level 3
1.15pm – 1.25pmRegistration Lecture Theatre, Beit Wing, Level -1
1.30pmWelcome Sean Rainbird, Director, National Gallery of Ireland
1.35pmIntroduction  Dr Aoife Brady, Curator, National Gallery of Ireland
1.50pmMurillo: The Prodigal Son Revisited Muirne Lydon, Conservator, National Gallery of Ireland
2.10pmThe Prodigal Son series. “Quatro cuadritos” by Murillo in the Museo del Prado. Elena Cenalmor Bruquetas, Researcher, Museo del Prado
2.30pmDiscoveries and Display: Murillo’s Virgin and Child in Glory Kate O’Donoghue, Curator, National Museums Liverpool, Walker Art Gallery
2.55pmQuestions and discussion
3.10pmTea / coffee Courtyard
3.50pmIntroduction Prof. Stefano Cracolici, Director, Zurbarán Centre
4pm“All rooms are furnished with great works of art” – the Beit collection Pauline Swords, Curator, Russborough, Co. Wicklow
4.20pmA Painter of Street Urchins and Beggars? The perception of Murillo in Britain. Isabelle Kent, Independent scholar
4.40pm“Something of immortal value”: Murillo at the Meadows Museum Dr Amanda Dotseth, Curator, Meadows Museum, Dallas
5.05pmQuestions and discussion
5.20pmClose

Click here for more information and to book tickets (Full price €25, students/OAPs €22.50, Friends €20)

Closing Soon: ‘Goya, génie d’avant-garde, le maître et son école’, Agen, France, until 10 February 2020

The City of Agen and its Fine Arts Museum, located between Bordeaux and Toulouse in the South-west of France, will present, over the winter of 2019–2020, an outstanding exhibition with a fresh and unexpected view on Francisco de Goya y Lucientes (1746–1828) and his work.


Through a selection of works in several media (paintings, drawings, engravings), the exhibition will demonstrate the essential characteristics that remain constant in Goya’s work and reveal the role played by his collaborators in his studio.


The Museum’s scientific team is assisted in this project by one of the specialists of Goya’s work, Juliet Wilson-Bareau, and the event has received personal support from the French Minister of Culture.


Nearly 90 works loaned by museums and private collections around the world (France, Germany, Hungary, Spain, Switzerland, UK, USA) will be on display in the Jacobins’ Church (Église des Jacobins), an Agen architectural jewel and an emblematic place for the Museum’s temporary exhibitions.


Click here for an exhibition leaflet, and here for practical information.

Lecture: Dr Pedro Cardim, ‘Reassessing the Portuguese Colonial Past: New Scholarly Perspectives and Political Activism’, Centre for the Study of International Slavery/Liverpool Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 6 February 2020

Thu, 6 February 2020

17:30 – 19:00 GMT

502 Teaching Hub, TR4

160 Mount Pleasant

Liverpool

L3 5TR

Free but please register at this link

Over the past two decades, Portugal’s colonial rule in Asia, South America, and Africa has been subject to increasingly intense debate both within academe and society at large. Innovative research has begun to question benign and Euro-centric approaches to the Portuguese imperial past and has now arrived at profoundly different views which expose the violent and exploitative character of colonial rule.

This set of new perspectives on Portugal’s colonial past, however, is also the result of an unprecedented involvement of activists and civic groups in public debate. One important example are the Associations of Portuguese of African descent, which campaign against still-prevailing forms of celebrating the Portuguese colonial past. These include the recent decision to create a ‘Museum of Discovery’ dedicated to Portugal’s maritime glory, or the monument dedicated to the Jesuit missionary António Vieira.

Scholarly revision and community activism both face hostile opposition. This talk discusses the main developments in an ongoing debate that continues to intensify, and that in itself highlights the importance of fostering critical debate about Portugal’s colonial past.

Professor Pedro Cardim’s main area of research is the history of the early modern Iberian world, with a focus on the interactions between Portugal and the Spanish Monarchy. He also works on the Portuguese colonial empire and the early modern Atlantic world. He has published numerous books and articles, including Portugal y la Monarquía Hispánica, ca.1550–ca.1715 (2017) and Polycentric Monarchies: How Did Early Modern Spain and Portugal Achieve and Maintain a Global Hegemony? (2012, with Tamar Herzog, Gaetano Sabatini and José Javier Ruiz Ibáñez). He has held visiting professorships at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, New York University, Université de Toulouse Jean Jaurès, and Universidad Pablo de Olavide (Seville).

For a podcast featuring Professor Cardim, see here: http://historyhub.ie/pedro-cardim-hispania-portugal-spanish-monarchy-16th-17th-century.

ARTES Glendinning Lecture 2020: Benito Navarrete Prieto (Universidad de Alcalá): ‘Appropriation and Cultural Transfer in the Early Modern Iberian World’, The Warburg Institute, 4 March 2020, 17:30

An annual event in honour of the great Hispanist Nigel Glendinning, supported by the Instituto Cervantes, and hosted in 2020 by the Warburg Institute.

04 March 2020, 17:30 to 20:00
The Warburg Institute, Woburn Square, London WC1H 0AB
Click here to book a place

José Juárez, Saints Justus and Pastor, c. 1653–1655, Museo Nacional de Arte (México)

Benito Navarrete Prieto (Universidad de Alcalá): ‘Appropriation and Cultural Transfer in the Early Modern Iberian World’

In his influential work The Mediterranean and the Mediterranean World in the Age of Philip II Fernand Braudel regretted that: ‘We have museum catalogues but no artistic atlases’. Since then historians and art historians alike, such as Luisa Elena Alcalá, Peter Burke and Jean Michel Massing among others, have explored cultural appropriations to make sense of what Thomas DaCosta Kaufmann has famously called the geographies of early modern art. This lecture examines forms of assimilation and reception of images, and aims to contribute to the current scholarly conversation concerning early modern artistic circulations. The method of appropriation through which a canonical image is reinterpreted is fundamental to understanding the transferral of images within the Iberian World. This mechanism of appropriation is useful to examine the range of visual identities that configured the map of cultural circulations in the period, and is thus a useful theoretical framework for the study of global art history. 

Featured Exhibition: ‘Montañés, maestro de maestros’, Museo de Bellas Artes, Seville, until 15 March 2020

Juan Martínez Montañés (Alcalá la Real, 1568–Seville, 1649) marked a milestone in Spanish Baroque sculpture and a timeless model in the Sevillian school. This exhibition provides an insight into a select repre­sentation of 44 sculptures and reliefs by the brilliant artist, of a total of 58 works on display. Divided into three sections, the itinerary presents an exceptional repertoire of works that bear witness to the ambition of the major commissions he undertook, the sublime quality of his devotional images and the novelty of his iconographic models. The first section features works from his most outstanding groups or altarpieces, such as those from San Isidoro del Campo and the convent of San Leandro. The second one offers key examples of his magnificent religious imagery, such as Saint Christopher and Saint Jerome, and the third one highlights his most significant contributions to Sevillian Baroque iconography, as exemplified by the Infant Jesus from the Cathedral Side­ Chapel, ‘La Cieguecita’ (Little Blind One), and the Christ of Clemency.

The connections with the artistic and intellectual world of the day reveal the collaboration between Montañés and other artists, also represented here by paintings that formed part of altarpieces or were the pictorial ex­pression of the new iconographies which the sculptor helped to establish. Many of the works on display have undergone con­servation and restoration works specifically for the exhibition, enabling us to appreciate the extraordinary quality and beauty of the grand masterís work in all its glory. Thanks to the generous collaboration of the Archbishopric of Seville, the exhibition also includes works which the general public rarely have the op­portunity to admire, either because they are located high up on altarpieces or hidden away in convents and monasteries.

Book Launch: ‘Black but Human’: Slavery and Visual Arts in Hapsburg Spain, 1480–1700′ by Carmen Fracchia, Peltz Gallery, Birkbeck University of London, 23 November 2019, 3–5pm

A book launch and Q&A will be held on the 23 November3–5pm, at the Peltz Gallery, Birkbeck University of London.

In this book launch, Birkbeck scholar Mpalive Msiska will interview Dr Carmen Fracchia, from the Department of Cultures and Languages, about her new book Black but Human: Slavery and Visual Arts in Hapsburg Spain, 1480–1700 (OUP, 2019). This will be followed by a brief conversation between the author and the visual artist Victoria Burgher, who will give a short presentation of her work.

Carmen Fracchia is a Paraguayan academic trained originally in Italian and Spanish Art History at the Universities of Siena and University College London. She is a Reader in Hispanic Art History at Birkbeck. Her work focuses on the visual articulations of Hispanic intellectual, political, and religious thought about local Spanish and transatlantic slavery, freedom, subjectivity, race, and hybridity, with special emphasis to the visual representations of Africans and Afro-Hispanic enslaved and liberated people, such as Juan de Pareja (Antequera, c.1610-Madrid, c.1670).

Mpalive Msiska is a Malawian academic who is a Reader in English and Humanities at Birkbeck where he teaches courses and supervises research work on Post-colonial and Global literatures as well as interdisciplinary subjects. He has previously taught at Bath Spa University and the University of Malawi, among others. His publications include Post-Colonial Identity in Wole Soyinka (2007), Wole Soyinka (1998), Writing and Africa (1997) and The Quiet Chameleon:  A Study of Poetry from Central Africa (1992) and the most recent chapter ‘Divine Ways of Cognition: the Burden of the Poet-Seer in Soyinka’s Idanre,’ in The Soyinka Impulse, eds Duro Oni and Bisi Adigun. He is a member of the Caine Prize Advisory Board, the Council of the British Institute in Eastern Africa as well as the Editorial Board of the Journal of Southern African Studies.

Victoria Burgher is a multi-disciplinary artist who lives and works in East London. She studied at Goldsmiths College (MA) and her politically engaged practice ranges from sculptural installations and site-specific interventions to collaborative community projects. She is interested in art’s ability to challenge histories and a fascination with materials and process inform her approach to making. Current work uses colonial commodities to decolonise the nostalgic narrative of Empire. She exhibits regularly in the UK and Europe.


Attendance is free but booking is necessary. Please click here to book and here for more information.