Category Archives: Uncategorized

Featured Exhibition: Tarsila do Amaral. Cannibalizing Modernism, Museu de Arte de Sao Paulo Assis Chateaubriand, Sao Paulo, Brazil, until 28 July 2019

This is the most comprehensive exhibition dedicated to the work of Brazilian artist Tarsila do Amaral (1886–1973), a pioneering figure in early 20th century Latin American art and who is currently being reassessed in the context of global modernisms. After studying with Fernand Léger (1881–1955) and André Lhote (1885–1962) in Paris, Tarsila, as she is widely known in Brazil, cannibalized modern European references to create a unique style of her own, true to her origins both in form and content, through the use of caipira [Brazilian countryside] colours, found in architecture and decorative arts: “pure blue, violaceous rose, bright yellow, singing green,” in her own words;  as well as representations of typical and local characters, scenes, and narratives. Much of her work was made in dialogue with two leading modernist intellectuals of her time: Mário de Andrade (1893–1945) and Oswald de Andrade (1890–1954). Tarsila’s work parallels the development of Oswald de Andrade’s antropofagia, a key concept in 20th-century Latin American thought. Antropofagia could be understood as a poetic program through which intellectuals in the tropics would ‘cannibalize’ European cultural references in order to produce something singular and hybrid of their own, bringing indigenous, Afro-Atlantic, and local elements into their work. The controversial painting A Negra [The Black Woman] has received special attention from the authors and is a central work in the exhibition. The exhibition aims at widening the perspectives from which we may access not only the artist’s work but also the larger narratives on global modernism, taking into account questions of race, class and colonialism.

Tarsila do Amaral: Cannibalizing Modernism is curated by Adriano Pedrosa and Fernando Oliva and is contextualized in a full year dedicated to women artists at MASP in 2019 under the heading Women’s Histories, Feminist Histories. The accompanying publication is the most comprehensive exhibition catalogue on Tarsila to date. With separate editions in Portuguese and in English, 360 pages each, it reproduces 113 of her works, as well as documents and photographs. The book features newly commissioned essays by Adriano Pedrosa, Amanda Carneiro, Fernando Oliva, Irene V. Small, Mari Rodríguez Binnie, Maria Bernardete Ramos Flores, Maria Castro, Michele Greet, Michele Bete Petry and Renata Bittencourt, historical texts by Paulo Herkenhoff and Sergio Miceli, and commentaries on Tarsila’s works by Artur Santoro, Carlos Eduardo Riccioppo, Guilherme Giufrida, and Matheus de Andrade.


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New rules to protect Machu Picchu World Heritage Site

The Peruvian government announced on Friday 10 May a two-week restriction to three important areas at Machu Picchu to prevent greater degradation to the iconic Inca citadel, whose name means “old mountain” in the Quechua language indigenous to the area. The mountain-top citadel lies around 100 kilometres (60 miles) from the Andean city of Cusco, the old Inca capital in south-eastern Peru, and was built during the reign of the Inca emperor Pachacuti (1438-1471). It was rediscovered in 1911 by the American explorer Hiram Bingham and declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1983.

From May 15 to 28 2019, access to the Temple of the Sun, the Temple of the Condor and the Intihuatana Stone will be strictly controlled, the Peruvian government said. “These measures are necessary to conserve Machu Picchu, given the evidence of deterioration” on stone surfaces caused by visitors to the three areas, the culture ministry said. Almost 6,000 visitors a day are permitted onto the 15th-century site in two waves. The new plan will give tourists just three hours to visit the three emblematic areas. The authorities will evaluate the impact of the measures before applying new permanent rules from June 1.

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Madrid’s Palacio de Liria to Become a Museum

Francisco de Goya y Lucientes (Spanish, 1746-1828), The Duchess of Alba in White, 1795. Oil on canvas. Colección Duques de Alba


As reported by El País and other Spanish newspapers, the Liria Palace, residence of the Dukes of Alba and home to Spain’s most important private collection, is being transformed into a museum and will soon open to the public every day of the week.

Touring from Madrid to Dallas, the recent exhibition Treasures from the House of Alba: 500 Years of Art and Collecting (Meadows Museum, 2015–16) has familiarised the public with masterpieces from this unparalleled collection. Yet the opening of a museum in the Liria Palace will allow visitors to experience the artworks in the spaces for which they were commissioned and collected.

Unlike such nearby collections as the Cerralbo o Lázaro Galdiano, the palace will continue to function as a residence. Works will be displayed according to the wishes of the last duchess of Alba, Cayetana Fitz-James Stuart y de Silva (1926–2014), who oversaw the partial opening of the palace to the public in 1975.

The museum’s opening date has not yet been announced.

“A Lifelong Involvement with the Museo del Prado”: a lecture by Sir John Elliott at the Embassy of Spain, London, 23 May 2019

On 23 May 2019, 6pm–8.30pm, the Honorary President of ARTES, Sir John Elliott (Regius Professor Emeritus, University of Oxford), will deliver a lecture in celebration of the 200th anniversary of the Museo del Prado. The lecture will take place at the Embassy of Spain, 24 Belgrave Square, London SW1X 8QA. A limited number of tickets are available to ARTES members by emailing the Spanish Embassy (emb.londres.ofc@maec.es).  

Casa Batlló, Barcelona: Restoration Project Open House, until 30 April 2019

By ChristianSchd – This file was derived from: Casa Batllo Overview Barcelona Spain.jpg, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=41698940

Less than a month remains to go on a one-hour guided tour of Antoni Gaudí’s Casa Battló in Barcelona, covering its history and the recent renovation of architectural features and interior fittings, such as lighting, windows and hangings. The visit also offers the opportunity to walk along the ‘Pasarela’ at 30 metres above ground level.

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Featured Exhibition: The Avant-garde Networks of Amauta: Argentina, Mexico, and Peru in the 1920s, Museo Nacional Reina Sofía, Madrid, until 27 May 2019

José Sabogal, Cover of the journal Amauta, n. 26 (September – October), 1929, Journal, Museo de Arte de Lima

Founded and directed by José Carlos Mariátegui, the Peruvian magazine Amauta was one of the most influential cultural and political periodicals of the early 20th century. The exhibition of more than 250 works follows Amauta’s development as a platform to explore the diversity of the avant-garde artistic production in Peru, Argentina, and Mexico and the debates that shaped the art of Latin America during the 1920s. This exhibition, organised by Beverly Adams, Curator of Latin American Art, Blanton Museum of Art, and Natalia Majluf, Director and Chief Curator, Museo de Arte de Lima, Peru addresses the avant-garde production of a vast network of artists and writers connected with Amauta. and includes works in a variety of forms ranging from paintings, drawings, sculptures and photographs through to popular ceramics, many by lesser known artists as well as pieces by Tina Modotti and Diego Rivera. A large network of correspondents in Latin America and Europe fed the magazine, which had a print run of 3-4,000, and gave Amauta an international impact.

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The exhibition will travel from Madrid to the Museo de Arte de Lima (20 June – 22 September 2019); the Palacio de Bellas Artes, Mexico City (17 October 2019 – 12 January 2020); and finally to Blanton Museum of Art, University of Texas at Austin, Texas (February 16, 2020 – 17 May, 2020).

Lunchtime Talks and Courses: Sorolla: Spanish Master of Light

Image: Joaquín Sorolla, Running along the Beach (detail), Valencia, 1908. Museo de Bellas Artes de Asturias, Oviedo, Colección Pedro Masaveu © Museo de Bellas Artes de Asturias. Col. Pedro Masaveu

Lunchtime Talk: Sorolla and Sargent, Monday, 29 April 2019, 1–1.45 pm, Sainsbury Wing Theatre, National Gallery, London
John Singer Sargent and Joaquín Sorolla belonged to an elite group of bravura painters who dominated the international art world of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Art historian Richard Ormond explores their friendship within the artistic context of their time.
Supported by the John Armitage Charitable Trust.
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Course: Painter of Spanish sunlight, Thursday, 2 May 2019 and Thursday, 9 May 2019, 2–4pm, Conference Room 1, National Gallery, London
Learn about Sorolla, the artist whom Monet called ‘the master of light.’ Art historian and ARTES’ committee member Gail Turner will trace Sorolla’s career, reflect on his place in Spanish art and explore his major works including the monumental panorama ‘Visions of Spain’. This two-week course introduces the life and work of the Spanish artist Joaquín Sorolla, from his paintings of sunlit beaches and gardens to his portraits and scenes of fishermen and rural life. Each week sessions are split into two parts, with ten minute break at 2.55pm.
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A rare chance to study this important artist, who was phenomenally successful in his own lifetime, but later eclipsed by modern artists such as Picasso.

Lunchtime Talk: Sorolla and nostalgia for ‘Moorish Spain’, Monday 13 May 2019, 1–1.45pm, Sainsbury Wing Theatre, National Gallery, London
Sorolla’s work in the context of Spain’s Islamic heritage and Spanish artists fascinated by Andalusia. Claudia Hopkins, Senior Lecturer in Art History at Edinburgh University, sets Sorolla’s work in the context of Spain’s Islamic heritage and Spanish artists fascinated by Andalusia.   Supported by the John Armitage Charitable Trust.  
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Lunchtime Talk: Painting with light, Monday 20 May 2019, 1–1.45 pm, Sainsbury Wing Theatre, National Gallery, London
Hear about the fascinating and often hidden relationships between painting and photography in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Martin Barnes, Senior Curator, Photographs at the V&A, reveals how developments in photography led to new pictorial possibilities for both art forms. Supported by the John Armitage Charitable Trust.
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