Category Archives: ARTES Event

Lecture: Felipe Pereda, ‘Images’ Oblivious Memory: Funerary Laments from Ancient Greece to El Greco’. Courtauld Institute of Art, London, 4pm, Thursday 25th January, 2018

Pereda

Felipe Pereda (Harvard), will give the inaugural lecture for the 2018-19 Coll & Cortes Medieval Spain Seminar Series at 4pm on Thursday 25th January in the Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre of the Courtauld Institute of Art, London.

An old narrative tradition going back to Ancient Egypt but documented across the Mediterranean – from the Middle East to Greece — shows women attending funerals performing theatrical, but also highly ritualized gestures that express unbearable pain. This visual trope corresponds to a practice that was surveyed and prosecuted in this part of the world well before the arrival of Christianity. The practice continued in Iberia throughout the Middle Ages, producing from the 12th century onwards an extraordinary tradition of painting and monumental sculpture. This lecture will explore the persistence, survival and repression of this practice and discuss the contribution of the visual arts to the production of cultural memory.

 

Felipe Pereda is Fernando Zóbel de Ayala Professor of Spanish Art at Harvard University. Born in Madrid, he studied at the Universidad Complutense, and the Autónoma University where he received his PhD (1995) and taught until 2011. In more recent years, he has also taught at the Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas (Universidad Autónoma de México), and Johns Hopkins University (2011-15). He has worked on Spanish late medieval and early modern art, art theory, image theory and history of architecture.

His books include, La arquitectura elocuente (1999), El atlas del Rey Planeta (3rd. ed. 2003), and Images of Discord. Poetics and Politics of the Sacred Image in 15th century Spain (Spanish ed. 2007; English translation, Harvey Miller, forthcoming). He has recently published on artists such as Luis de Morales, Ribera, or Zurbarán.

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Book Launch: A new edition of Goya and his Critics by Nigel Glendinning, Instituto Cervantes, London, 7-8.30pm, 12 December 2017

10355_i_imagen20autorretratoWe celebrate with ARTES (Iberian and Latin American Visual Culture Group) the publication of a new edition of Nigel Glendinning’s Goya and his Critics by Dr Sarah Symmons and Dr Jesusa Vega.

Nigel Glendinning’s Goya and His Critics was first published in English in 1977 and appeared in Spanish some five years later. This was the first great synthesis of the reception of Goya as an artist and this new edition assesses the importance of Glendinning’s research not only for Goya studies but for Hispanic art and culture in general. This study includes essays by Jesusa Vega and Sarah Symmons, a foreword by Valeriano Bozal and analyses Glendinning’s mission to reveal the mysterious and evocative art of Goya to a culture which found the artist’s originality disturbing as well as inspiring.

Sarah Symmons-Goubert has won numerous awards for her academic work. She has published five books on art history, including Art & Ideas, Goya (Phaidon Press, 1998) and Goya, a life in letters (Pimlico, Random House, 2004).

In English

Free admission. RSVP http://bit.ly/goyacritics

ARTES Event: Curator’s tour of ‘El Greco to Goya’ at the Wallace Collection, 21 November 2017, 10 am

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Isabelle Kent, Enriqueta Harris Frankfort curatorial assistant at the Wallace Collection,  will give ARTES members a tour of the exhibition on 21st November at 10:00.
Please RSVP to artesiberia@gmail.com by 15 November.
This event is open to ARTES members only.

ARTES Event: Curator’s tour of ‘El Greco to Goya’ at the Wallace Collection, 21 November 2017, 10 am

20424015_10155128772606865_9178298814727747987_o

Isabelle Kent, Enriqueta Harris Frankfort curatorial assistant at the Wallace Collection,  will give ARTES members a tour of the exhibition on 21st November at 10:00.
Please RSVP to artesiberia@gmail.com by 15 November.
This event is open to ARTES members only.

Prize-Giving Ceremony at the Wallace Collection, 29 June 2017

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Some of the Prize Winners pose with the ARTES committee and members at the prize-giving ceremony

On Thursday 29 June ARTES celebrated the winners of its annual scholarships and of the Juan Facundo Riaño Essay Prize with a ceremony held at the Wallace Collection in London. The Collection’s director Xavier Bray and Carmen Brieva Rodriguez from the Cultural Office of the Spanish Embassy joined the celebration.

ARTES started offering travel and PhD scholarships three years ago, with the aim to support and nurture young scholars in the field of Iberian and Latin American studies. The prizes are sponsored by Coll y Cortés and were awarded to the following researchers:

Travel Scholarships:

  • Ana Dias, a PhD candidate at the University of Durham, working on ‘The Apocalypse in early medieval Iberia: the function and impact of the illuminated ‘Beatus’ manuscripts.’ Ana will use her prize to conduct crucial fieldwork in three libraries in Spain, where she will examine three manuscripts of Beatus’ work to analyse at first hand their codicology, illumination and palette.
  • Maria Teresa Chicote Pompanin, a PhD candidate at the Warburg Institute, who will make three trips to Spain to examine archives, buildings and objects in connection with her research project, titled ‘Patronage, Fame and Memory in Late-Medieval Castile: Juan and Diego Pacheco, Marquises of Villena (1445 – 1529).’

PhD Scholarship for PhD students at working on Hispanic visual culture before 1800 at a UK University:

  •  Maeve O’Donnell, for her PhD at the Courtauld Institute of Art: ‘The Castilian Altar in the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries: A social and material history.’ Maeve’s thesis approaches the medieval altar as an assemblage of artworks with individual and cumulative religious, social and material significance. By donating or producing the different furnishings of the altar, craftsmen, merchants, bishops, and monarchs established personal links to this sacred space. In addition, objects displayed on the altar in medieval Castile functioned as barometers of political and economic shifts in this dynamic kingdom. Her analysis of Castilian altarpieces, frontals, figurative sculptures, liturgical objects, reliquaries and textiles unearths works of art that have not been studied before while offering an innovative approach to the medieval altar.

Scholarship for PhD students or post-doctoral researchers based in Spain, Portugal or Latin America who wish to conduct research in the UK:

  • Ignacio J. López Hernández, who is working on a dissertation about Architecture and Military Buildings in the Spanish Caribbean under the supervision of Dr Alfredo Morales at the University of Seville.

This year the Scholarship Committee was able to make two additional awards:

  • Francisco de Asís García García, for his travel to the UK to study reports and files held at the V&A’s Archive related to Medieval and Early Modern textile acquisitions from Spain (or of possible Spanish origin) and the iconographical analysis of selected pieces. This work is a joint collaborative study with the Marie S.-Curie project “Interwoven” (no. 703711) led by Dr Ana Cabrera Lafuente at the V&A.
  • Sylvia Alvares-Correa, a PhD candidate at Oxford, whose research considers the Flemish artworks associated with Rainha Dona Leonor of Portugal (1458-1525), including Quentin Metsys’s The Seven Sorrows of the Virgin; Goswyn van der Weyden’s Presentation at the Temple; a number of manuscripts, and the anonymous Passion of Christ in Jerusalem panorama, amongst others. By investigating the historiography, materiality, and iconography of these works and their place within the ambit of Dona Leonor’s piety and patronage, this project will contribute to the broader understanding of patterns of patronage in early modern Europe, artistic exchange between Flanders and Iberia, and the devotional climate of Renaissance Portugal.

The winner of the 2017 Juan Facundo Riaño Essay Prize was also announced. This prize was set up 5 years ago with the generous support of the Office for Scientific and Cultural Affairs of the Embassy of Spain in London, and includes a cash prize and a specially designed bronze medal. Like the scholarships, the essay prize is intended to encourage promising scholars in the study of Spanish visual culture (from any period) and is open to students at UK universities at any level of study.

This year’s winner was David Cambronero, a MA student at the Courtauld Institute of Art, who gave a short presentation based on his essay on lighting in the Great Mosque of Córdoba in the caliphal period.

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