Tag Archives: Los Angeles

American Society for Hispanic Art Historical Studies at College Art Association 2018: Call for session proposals

American Society for Hispanic Art Historical Studies
(ASHAHS)

If you have thought about chairing a panel at the annual meeting of the College Art Association, Los Angeles, 21-24 February 2018, please consider submitting a proposal for ASHAHS sponsorship. As an affiliated society, ASHAHS is able to sponsor one ninety-minute session at this conference.

We seek session proposals that represent the vibrant diversity found within Iberian and Ibero-American art history and welcome those panel topics that will stimulate both broad interest and robust discussion.

Guidelines for proposals from affiliated societies may be found here, including CAA’s requirements concerning membership.

If you would like a panel to be considered for ASHAHS sponsorship, please submit your proposal to Carmen Ripollés or Kelly Watt.  Deadline: 7 April 2017.

Proposals will be evaluated on their scholarly strengths and, all other factors being equal, priority will be given to current ASHAHS members who have paid dues this calendar year. Our goal is to promptly notify the chair(s) of the proposal selected for ASHAHS sponsorship well in advance of CAA’s deadline for session and individual proposals.

Picasso at LACMA

2016-08-Picasso-LACMA-1

Picasso and his Printers

Los Angeles County Museum of Art
23 July – 27 November 2016

The stimulus Picasso received from his printers was critical to his exploration of his graphic art and this exhibition, largely drawn from LACMA’s collections, covers seven decades of his career, from his conventional early drypoints to the radical approach to etching of the 1930s when he began his close association with Roger Lacourière and his later innovative collaborations with Fernand Mourlot for lithography and Hidalgo Arnéra for linocut printing.

CFP: Questioning the concept of Mudejar Architecture

Mudejar Roof, Teruel Cathedral

Mudejar Roof, Teruel Cathedral (Photo credit: Jose Luis Filpo Cabana. Licensed under GFDL via Wikimedia Commons)

QUESTIONING THE CONCEPT OF MUDÉJAR ARCHITECTURE

Society of Architectural Historians
SAH 69th Annual International Conference, Pasadena/LA, April 6 – 10, 2016
Call for Papers: Questioning the concept of Mudejar Architecture
Deadline: Jun 9, 2015

Medieval exchange processes between Muslim Spain, the northern Christian kingdoms and the Sephardic Jews created a specific building style in the Iberian Peninsula. On the occasion of his inaugural lecture El estilo Mudéjar en arquitectura, held in 1859 at the Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando, José Amador de los Ríos named this specific style Mudéjar, a term used in the academic literature till this day. The transmission of a historical term designating a specific population group (i.e. Muslims in Christian territories) into architectural history induces a terminological grey area. When did the term Mudéjar appear in historical records, i.e., was it already used in Pre-Modern times as a category for demarcation? Where shall we draw the frontiers between Islamic, Mudéjar, Christian and Jewish Architecture? Which are the determining factors that feature a building as Mudéjar? Is it the confession of the patron or that of the craftsman, the functional aspect (church, synagogue) or the stylistic feature that permits a classification? How do we relate a Mudéjar building to Mudéjar population? What is the role of the patron and/or the craftsman in modifying Islamic patterns into a Christian or Jewish language?
The interdisciplinary approach (Art History/Historical Sciences) of the session will allow a critical debate on the concept of Mudéjar Architecture, which has recently been questioned in the work Under the influence: Questioning the Comparative in Medieval Castile (Leiden, 2005). We encourage the submission of specific case studies that will permit to simultaneously highlight the complexity of cross-border processes and question the compatibility with the current field boundaries, while emphasizing the significance of the Iberian Peninsula as a cultural contact zone within the current international globalization discourse.
Session chairs: Francine Giese, University of Zurich; francine.giese@khist.uzh.ch; and Ana Echevarría Arsuaga, UNED Madrid; aechevarria@geo.uned.es.
Please submit abstracts (no more than 300 words) via the online submission portal by June 9, 2015.2015-05-sah-2016-annual-international-conference-logo

Alfredo Ramos Martinez, Los Angeles

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Exhibition:
Alfredo Ramos Martinez (1872-1946): An exhibition in honour of Maria Martinez Bolster
Louis Stern Fine Arts, Los Angeles
30 April – 11 July 2015

A display of drawings and paintings by the Mexican artist who having trained in Paris was made head of the National Academy in Mexico City in 1913, where he supervised the enrollment of the young muralist David Siqueiros amongst others and influenced the Modernist artist Rufino Tamayo. The works on show are from the 1930s and 1940s when Ramos Martinez had settled in Los Angeles, whilst he was seeking medical assistance for his young daughter crippled with a bone disease, though the imagery is inspired by the Mexican landscape and people. The Louis Stern Galleries represents the artist’s estate.

Rubens, Madrid and Los Angeles

Triumph-of-the-Eucharist-over-Idolatry-Peter-Paul-Rubens-1625-6-oil-on-panel_-Museo-Nacional-del-Prado-Madrid1Rubens: The Triumph of the Eucharist, 25 March – 29 June 2014, Prado; and travelling to the Getty, Los Angeles in 14 October 2014 – 4 January 2015.
Display of six recently conserved panel paintings which Rubens painted as modelli for The Triumph of the Eucharist part of the series of 20 tapestries commissioned by Philip III’s sister the Infanta Clara Eugenia in 1625 to decorate the convent of Las Descalzas Reales in Madrid, to which the Infanta intended to retire. Four of the tapestries will also form part of the exhibition to illustrate the artistic process from Rubens’ initial painted designs to the finished tapestries woven in 1628 by the Geubels’ family workshop. Other tapestries from the series will remain on display in the convent, which is also open to the public as part of the Patrimonio Nacional.