Monthly Archives: February 2014

Two talks on medieval Spain at the Courtauld Institute

Saldana Chapel, Tordesillas

Saldaña Chapel, Tordesillas

As part of the Courtauld Institute’s annual postgraduate symposium on 6-7 March, Nicola Jennings will give a talk on ‘The Capilla del Contador Saldaña at Santa Clara de Tordesillas: A Study in Converso Patronage’ on Friday 7 March from 12.50-13.40pm.

On Thursday 6 March between 14.45-15.40 another student, Michaela Zoschg, will be giving a paper on ‘A Medieval Queen as Art Agent? Sancha of Mallorca and the Poor Clares of Palma and Aix-en-Provence’.

All are welcome

ZURBARÁN: Master of Spain’s Golden Age

Exhibition

The Bozar Centre for Fine Arts,Rue Ravenstein 33, 1000 Brussels

Wed 29 January – Sun 25 May 2014

Francisco de Zurbarán, Portrait of Santa Casilda, oil on canvas, Museo Thyssen, Madrid.jpg,Santa Casilda, c.1635, oil on canvas, 171 x 107 cms, Museo Thyssen Bornemisza Madrid

A Cup of Water and a Rose, c.1630, oil on canvas, 21 x 30 cms, National Gallery London

 zurbaran-cup-water-rose-NG6566-fm

For more information see  http://www.bozar.be/activity.php?id=13203i

“Zurbarán,” first shown at the Palazzo dei Diamanti in Ferrara,  and now showing at Bozar in Brussels until 25 May 2014, is the first show dedicated to the artist since the landmark publication of the first volume of Odile Delenda’s catalogue raisonné of the artist’s work in 2009, which identified 286 paintings as being by his own hand. Expertly curated by Ignacio Cano Rivero and Gabriele Finaldi, this skillfully selected and lucidly presented show of 49 pieces offers a comprehensive survey of Zurbarán’s career and is studded with masterpieces.

Zurbarán’s father was a textile merchant in the village of Fuente de Cantos in southern Spain, where the artist was born in 1598. Francisco was apprenticed to a now forgotten local painter in Seville from 1614 to 1617, during which time he met Velázquez, who became a lifelong friend. But whereas the latter forged a career in the courts of Madrid and Rome, becoming the leading portrait painter of his age, Zurbarán had a vocation for religious painting (and a deep knowledge of Spain’s mystical thought and literature).

Having moved to Llerena, in his native province of Badajoz, in 1622, the artist received a commission for 15 canvases for his birthplace. By the mid 1620s he was also sending cycles of works to Seville, where in 1629 he was invited by the city council to take up residence and where he would spend most of the rest of his life.

Although Zurbarán never set foot outside Spain, by the time he was training as a painter Caravaggio’s work was well known there. But whatever lessons Zurbarán learned from Caravaggio, his own paintings, not to mention his subject matter, remained distinct from the outset, not least in the intense spirituality with which he infused his images.

The exhibition continues roughly chronologically, but also according to themes: “First Major Commissions,” “Visions and Ecstasies,” “Still-lifes,” “The Mystical in the Everyday,” “Passion and Compassion,” “Works for the Court and the New World” and “Last Years: Madrid.”

Zurbarán’s vibrant still-lifes have been a key element in stimulating the rediscovery of this artist in modern times, though he did only a handful of independent works in this genre. Two of the most celebrated, “A Cup of Water and a Rose” from the National Gallery in London, and “Still-life” from the Prado in Madrid, are on display here. The pious message of these pieces tends to be overlooked by modern viewers. For Zurbarán’s contemporaries, the rose in the National Gallery picture, for instance, would have had clear associations with the Virgin Mary, and the white cup with purity and the Immaculate Conception.

These still-lifes were evidently popular in the artist’s own times, as he produced several versions of some of them. And beautifully executed still-life elements play an important emblematic part in many of his other paintings — from skulls, flowers and bowls of fruit to the brilliantly lit earthenware jug, bread, olives and radishes, representing the eucharist and Christ’s humility, in “Supper at Emmaus,” on loan from the Museo Nacional de San Carlos in Mexico City.

The artist’s studio in Seville produced a large number of canvases specifically for export to the New World. These were typically sold at the annual fair in Portobelo, Panama, and most ended up in Peru, where many can still be found. A high proportion of these pictures, executed by Zurbarán’s assistants, were of Biblical patriarchs.

By the time Zurbarán was in his 50s, Seville was suffering an economic crisis as a result of a diminution in trade with America and of the wars in Europe, further worsened by a plague in 1649, to which he lost his son Juan, a promising still-life painter. He also found himself challenged by a new generation of artists, above all Murillo.

In 1658 Zurbarán moved to Madrid, where he remained until his death in 1664. As the last two rooms of the Ferrara show reveal, his style and palette underwent radical changes there, particularly under the influence of Raphael, whose works were by then well represented in the Royal Collection.

Extracted from review by RODERICK CONWAY MORRIS   The New York Times   Published: October 23, 2013

El Greco Conference – Toledo 19-23 May 2014

The Centro de Estudios Internacionales, Fundación Ortega y Gasset-Marañón, Toledo

El Greco: works and places

This conference will look in detail at El Greco’s art and at the places where he lived and worked. Leading experts will be delivering their lectures in situ with the artist’s works and Toledo will be hosting many related exhibitions and events to mark the anniversary.

Contributers: Mark A. Roglan, Juan A. García Castor, Fernando Checa Cremades, Fernando Marías, Ángel Aterido, Palma Martínez, María Cruz de Carlos, Leticia Ruíz Gómez, Gabriele Finaldi, Alicia Cámara and Araceli Fernández.

Deadline for registration: 28 February 2014

For full details see the following links

http://www.ortegaygasset.es/noticias/ampliada/981/curso-internacional–las-obras-y-lugares-de-el-greco

http://www.ortegaygasset.es/fog/ver/726/programas-de-postgrado/cursos-de-postgrado/las-obras-y-lugares-de-el-greco

Folleto Curso El Greco english  –  please print this leaflet and put it on your noticeboard

ARTES Symposium & Lecture to celebrate 400th anniversary of the death of El Greco

Burial of the Count of Orgaz, San Tomas, Toledo

The Burial of the Count of Orgaz, Santo Tomé, Toledo

To celebrate the 400th anniversary of the death of El Greco, ARTES will be holding a Symposium & Lecture at the Instituto Cervantes102 Eaton Sq, London SW1W 9AN, 3.30pm – 7.30pm, Friday 28th February 2014

The symposium starts at 3.30pm and will be followed at 6.30pm by a special ARTES lecture given by Professor Fernando Marías, curator of the forthcoming exhibition of El Greco’s paintings in Toledo, entitled Was El Greco a Spanish Painter? Challenging a Myth, Reading El Greco’s Documents and Writings

Entrance for the symposium is £15, or £6 for ARTES/Instituto Cervantes members(or join us instead! £35/year, or £20 for students/under 25s/JSAs). Entrance for the lecture is free. If you would like to attend, please contact Morlin Ellis at artesiberia@gmail.com

LOGO CERVANTES ROJO

Spanish embassy logoARTES would like to thank the Embassy of Spain and the Instituto Cervantes for their kind and generous support of this event

PROVISIONAL TIMETABLE

3.30: Welcome, Dr Tom Nickson (Chair, ARTES)

3.35: Opening remarks, Sir John Elliott, FBA (Honorary President, ARTES)

3.45: Dr Hilary Macartney (University of Glasgow): Portrait of a Lady: the Reception of the “Lady in a Fur Wrap” in the Stirling Maxwell Collection, Glasgow

4.15: Prof David Davies (Curator, National Gallery El Greco exhibition, 2004): El Greco, the Painter/Philosopher

4.45: tea/coffee & biscuits

5.15: Susan Wilson (artist): La Joven Enferma y El Entierro del Conde de Orgaz

5.45: discussion

6.30: Prof Fernando Marías (Curator, El Greco of Toledo, 2014): Was El Greco a Spanish Painter? Challenging a Myth, Reading El Greco’s Documents and Writings (open to all)

7.30: drinks reception

Call for Papers: Theorizing the Spiritual Past: Critical Approaches to Early Iberian Hagiography

New Picture (2)Theorizing the Spiritual Past: Critical Approaches to Early Iberian Hagiography College of St Hild and St Bede, Durham, 7‒8 July 2014

Over the last decade there has been a striking upsurge in the volume of critical interest in Iberian hagiography in all of its manifold forms. In painting and the fine arts through to poetic and narrative treatments composed in Castilian, Catalan, and Portuguese, the legacies of Christ, Mary, and the saints have been approached from a number of perspectives and subjected to detailed critical scrutiny. This work has been informed by a series of theoretical approaches, from issues of gendered identity in the analysis of Mary and the typology of female sanctity, through to questions of corporeality and the extent to which the expression and experience of popular piety is rooted in the body. This conference, which focuses specifically on the application of theoretical and methodological approaches to analysis, asks what scholars of early Iberian hagiography can bring to the analysis of the sacred past and how the study of the discipline can be taken forward innovatively in the future. It seeks in particular to explore interdisciplinary methodologies and the ways in which they intersect with broader discourses in other branches of research.

Proposals are invited for 30-minute papers on any theoretically-informed aspect of Iberian hagiography. Titles and brief abstracts (of no more than 200 words) should be sent to the conference organizer before 7 April 2014.

For further information, please contact:
Dr Andy Beresford
School of Modern Languages and Cultures
Durham University
Elvet Riverside
New Elvet
Durham DH1 3JT
United Kingdom
(a.m.beresford@durham.ac.uk)

The Embassy of Spain invites ARTES members to Lecture on Richard Hamilton & Pop Art in Spain

Richard Hamilton Lecture Embassy Feb 2014

The Embassy of Spain is kindly inviting ARTES members to a Lecture to be held at the Luis Vives hall at the Embassy in 39 Chesham Place, London SW1X 8SB on Wed 26 Feb 2014 at 6.30pm. Entitled Some Notes on Richard Hamilton & Pop Art in Spain 1960-1976, it will be given by Dr Teresa Millet of the Valencia Institute of Modern Art. If you would like to attend please either contact the Embassy direct on the email given above or contact Morlin at artesiberia@gmail.com. Please note photographic ID will be needed for entry.

Call for Papers: ‘Representations of Violence and Ethics in Ibero-American Cultures’

Conference to be held on Friday 9th May 2014 at the University of Manchester.
For further information please see: http://conferencerveiac.wordpress.com/
We invite colleagues to send an abstract (max. 300 words) for a twenty-minute paper, along with a brief biographical note, by Moday 31st March 2014 to conference.rveiac@gmail.com.
Convenors: Ignacio Aguiló (ignacio.aguilo@manchester.ac.uk) and Miquel Pomar-Amer (miquel.pomar-amer@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk)
This conference is generously supported by Language-Based Area Studies, School of Arts, Languages and Cultures (University of Manchester).
_______________
This international conference aims to examine the way in which literature and the arts have represented violence in Latin America and the Iberian Peninsula since the 1960s, with a particular interest in the ethical aspects that such a representation entails. Our aim is to analyse how ethics and aesthetics interact in the portrayal of traumatic events. How can artistic representations contribute to processes of mourning? Does art contribute to the perpetuation and trivialisation of violence? Where are the limits of the morally acceptable? What is the role of artistic representations in the face of atrocity?
All of these questions are particularly relevant considering that 2014 marks the commemoration of the tenth anniversary of the Atocha bombings in Madrid and the twentieth anniversary of the attack on the AMIA bombing that targeted the Jewish community in Buenos Aires.
Proposals are invited for papers which explore some of these suggested topics – although they are not exclusive:
– Mourning and post-traumatic reactions
– Monuments and commemorations
– Modes of representation: the abject, the mythical, the allegorical, the grotesque, the spectacular
– Racial and religious-based violence
– Gender violence
– Violence and parody/irony
– Violence and reception studies
– Violence and consent
– Forgetting/forgiving
– ‘Unethical’ representations: challenges to the ethical constraints