Tag Archives: Contemporary art

Opening Event: Enrique Vila-Matas in conversation with Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Whitechapel Gallery, London, 17 January 2019

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Carlos Pazos, Milonga, 1980 (detail), Hand-coloured photograph with collage and fluorescent light, 105 × 100 cm. © Carlos Pazos, A+V Agencia de Creadores Visuales, 2019

An exhibition dedicated to “la Caixa” Collection of Contemporary Art opens today at the Whitechapel Gallery, London (17 January–28 April 2019).

Works in the exhibition have been selected from one of Spain’s leading collections of contemporary art by the Spanish novelist Enrique Vila-Matas (born 1948). During 2019 the Caixa collection will be explored at the Whitechapel in four separate displays curated by internationally acclaimed authors, who have also been invited by the Gallery to contribute a fictional text based on their selection. Vila-Matas seeks truth through fiction and values ‘the ambiguity of experience’. Among his selected works is a video by Dora García (b. 1965, Spain) featuring a girl receiving strict instruction on how to perform breathing exercises. In a staged self-portrait by Carlos Pazos (b. 1949, Spain) the artist appears lost in melancholic reverie at a Barcelona nightclub. These small dramas contrast with seemingly timeless landscapes. A mixed media painting by Miquel Barceló (b. 1957, Spain) and a digitally collaged photograph by Andreas Gursky (b. 1955, Germany) take a ground level and an aerial perspective on the land, where the human figure is absent or minute. Click here for more information.

At 7pm on 17 January Vila-Matas will be in conversation in French (with English translation) with his long-time friend the artist Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster and signing copies of his specially written novel Cabinet d’Amateur. Click here for further information and tickets (£9.50).

 

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Closing Soon: Cortés. Retrato y estructura, Fundación Unicaja de Cádiz, until 31 January 2019

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The painter’s study. Estudio del pintor. Private collection, Madrid. Photo: María Bisbal.

Hernán Cortés Moreno (Cádiz, 1953) has succeeded in renewing the genre of Spanish portraiture by introducing to it elements of abstraction, pop art and cinematography. This exhibition of some 130 portraits of key individuals important to the history, politics and culture of Spain over recent decades and includes a portrait of Sir John Elliott, the historian of Spain and the Americas and Emeritus President of ARTES. Other sitters include the former Socialist prime minister, Felipe González, the historian, physician and philosopher Gregorio Marañón and the British-born architect Norman Foster as well as friends and family members from the 1980s onwards. 

Click here for more information, and here for the artist’s website

Featured Exhibition: ‘Southern Geometries, from Mexico to Patagonia’, Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain, Paris, until February 24, 2019

CartierThe exhibition Southern Geometries, from Mexico to Patagonia celebrates the wealth of color and diversity of styles in the geometric art of Latin America, bringing together 250 artworks made by over 70 artists from the Pre-Columbian period to present. Including modernist abstract art, sculpture and architecture as well as ceramics, weaving, and body painting, the exhibition explores the wide range of approaches to geometric abstraction in Latin America, whether influenced by Pre-Columbian art, the European avant-garde or Amerindian cultures. Southern Geometries weaves visual relationships among diverse cultures and regions across time, inviting visitors to discover the vibrant patterns and designs of Latin American art.

Click here to find out more.

Curators in Conversation: Looking at Spanish Old Masters Today, Colnaghi Foundation, 6 December 2018, 6:30–8:30pm

Michael Petry, Libation to Apollo (IX), 2018, 24k gold leaf on acrylic on canvas, 20 x 1 cm

Curators in Conversation: Looking at Spanish Old Masters Today

with

Nicola Jennings, Director, Colnaghi Foundation 

and 

Michael Petry, Artist & Director, MoCA London 

Discussing the lasting influence of Spanish Old Masters in contemporary arts practice. This event is part of Spain NOW! – celebrating the 10th anniversary of the season of contemporary arts and culture in London. 

Thursday 6th December 
6:30 – 8:30 pm


Colnaghi Foundation
26 Bury Street
St James’s
London, SW1Y 6AL

Michael Petry studied at Rice University, Houston (BA), London Guildhall University (MA), and has a Doctor in Arts from Middlesex University. Petry is an artist, author and Director of the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) London. Petry co-founded the Museum of Installation, was Guest Curator at the Kunstakademiet, Oslo, and was Curator of the Royal Academy Schools Gallery. Petry co-authored Installation Art (1994), and Installation in the New Millennium (2003), and authored Abstract Eroticism (1996) and A Thing of Beauty is…(1997), The Trouble with Michael. His book Hidden Histories: 20th century male same sex lovers in the visual arts (2004) was the first comprehensive survey of its kind, and accompanied Hidden Historieswhich he curated for The New Art Gallery Walsall. Golden Rain (2008) accompanied his installation for the On the Edge exhibition for Stavanger 2008, European Capital of Culture. Petry was the first Artist in Residence at Sir John Soane’s Museum (2010/11) and his one man show The Touch of the Oracle at the Palm Springs Art Museum (2012) was accompanied by a ten year career review book. Petry’s work was included in the 2015 Frontiers Reimagined at the Venice Biennale, and his one-man show AT the Core of the Algorithm accompanied his Campbell Lectures at Rice University. Petry’s books include The Art of Not Making: The New Artist Artisan Relationship (2011), Nature Morte: Contemporary Artists reinvigorate the Still-Life tradition (2013) and The WORD is ART (2018).

Nicola Jennings is Director of the Colnaghi Foundation and Associate Lecturer at the Courtauld Institute of Art. She completed her MA and doctorate at the Courtauld, and has worked at the National Gallery and City University in London. Her research and publications focus on art and patronage in Spain in the fifteenth, sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, with a particular interest in northern European artists working in Iberia, conversos, and polychrome sculpture. She is a co-author of the first two volumes in the Coll & Cortés Studies series, Lorenzo Mercadante: Virgen del Buen Fin, and Alonso Berruguete: Renaissance Sculptor.

RSVP to info@colnaghifoundation.org

Panel discussion: Spanish Women Artists in the UK, Edmond J. Safra Lecture Theatre, King’s College London, 11/09/2018, 7–9 pm

Spanish Women Artists in the UK

Four Spanish women artists based in the UK discuss their experiences and achievements in the Performing and Visual Arts:  Tamara Rojo, Artistic Director of the English National Ballet;  Angela de la Cruz, visual artist;  Paula Paz, associate director of the Cervantes Theatre; and Isabel del Rio, poet and writer.  The discussion will focus on how their Spanish background informs their work, on the unique artistic perspectives of biculturalism and bilingualism, and on their contribution to British Art and London’s cultural scene.
Event hosted by Idil Sukan, artist and photographer.
Tamara Rojo was appointed Artistic Director of English National Ballet in 2012.  She combines this role with her dancing career, performing as Lead Principal with the Company.  In January 2016 Tamara Rojo became D.A. Magna Cum Laude, presenting her thesis ‘Psychological Profile of the Elite Dancer – Vocational Characteristics of the Professional Dancer’ at Rey Juan Carlos University, and was awarded a CBE for her services to ballet in the Queen’s 2016 New Year’s Honours.
Angela de la Cruz studied Philosophy at the University of Santiago de Compostela.  In the late 80s she moved to London where she studied at Chelsea College of Art and later at Goldsmiths College and Slade School of Art.  She has exhibited in galleries all over the world, including the show entitled “After”, her first solo exhibition in the UK at Camden Arts Centre in April 2010.  In May 2010 she was nominated for the Turner Prize.
Paula Paz is co-founder and Associate Director of the Cervantes Theatre and the Spanish Theatre Company.  She is a theatre director and former professional ballet dancer and holds an MA with distinction in theatre directing from Mountview Academy of Theatre Arts.  She has directed The Little Pony, The Swallow, Darwin’s Tortoise, Knives in Hens, Eigengrau, History of a Staircase and Hay que deshacer la Casa.
Organized by Instituto Cervantes in collaboration with Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies (SPLAS) at King’s College London, The Spanish Women Network and the British Spanish Society.
For more information, click here. Free admission, RSVP.

News: 200 works of contemporary Latin American art donated to six museums

Cildo Meireles (Brazilian, born 1948). Meshes of Freedom. 1976/77. Iron and glass. 47 1/4 x 48 1/4 x 1 1/2″ (120 x 122.6 x 3.8 cm). Promised gift of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros through the Latin American and Caribbean Fund.

Cildo Meireles, Meshes of Freedom (1976/77), promised gift of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros through the Latin American and Caribbean Fund. Courtesy of MoMA

The Art Newspaper reports that the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros (CPPC) has donated 200 works of contemporary Latin American art to American and European museums including the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York, the Museo National Centro de Arte Reina Sofía in Madrid, the Museo de Arte Moderno Buenos Aires (MAMBA) and the Museo de Arte de Lima (MALI).
Featuring artworks by 91 artists from 22 countries, the donation is intended to complement the strengths or interests of each museum, celebrating their commitment to studying and exhibiting contemporary Latin American art.

Thinking Ibero-America: Modernity and Indigenism

juandowneyThinking Ibero-America: Modernity and Indigenism,’ Birkbeck, University of London,

Malet St, Bloomsbury, WC1E 7HX, 23/11/2017, 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

Ticio Escobar in conversation with John Kraniauskas

Under the dominance of European and then Creole elites, the people of Latin America have historically looked to Europe and North America as referents for cultural modernity. Until recently, everything related to indigenous people and culture was associated with the idea of underdevelopment. However, with globalisation, contemporary cultural discourses have begun incorporating notions of diversity, difference, inclusion and cultural rights; this allows for the articulation of new critical visions such as that of Paraguayan Ticio Escobar.

A lawyer, curator, teacher, art critic and cultural promoter, Ticio Escobar was Minister of Culture of Paraguay (2008-2012). Prior to that, he was Director of Culture of the Municipality of Asuncion (1991-1996) and founder of the Museum of Indigenous Art. He is the author of the National Law of Culture of Paraguay and President of the Paraguayan Section of the International Association of Art Critics. He has published numerous books on Paraguayan and Latin American art. He currently directs the Centro de Artes Visuales/Museo del Barro in Asunción.

John Kraniauskas is Professor of Latin American Studies at Birkbeck (UL). Expert in literature and cultural studies, he is the author of numerous essays and translations. His latest book is Capitalism and its Discontents: Power and Accumulation in Latin American Culture (University of Wales Press, 2017). He met Ticio Escobar on a trip to Paraguay during the days of Stroessner, as a member of the Parliamentary Group on Human Rights.

The Thinking Ibero-America cycle is a cooperation between the Instituto Cervantes and Canning House, with the collaboration of the Center for Iberian and Latin American Visual Studies (CILAVS), Birkbeck, University of London, and Birkbeck Institute of the Humanities (BIH).

The event will be held in the Clore Lecture Theatre, Birkbeck, University of London (access through Torrington Square).

In Spanish and English.