Tag Archives: Studies

New Publication: Santa Teresa o la llama permanente. Estudios históricos, artísticos y literario (Madrid, 2017)

santa_teresa_portada-1-300x439Esther Borrego Gutiérrez and Jaime Olmedo Ramos eds., Santa Teresa o la llama permanente. Estudios históricos, artísticos y literarios (Madrid: Centro de Estudios Europa Hispánica, 2017).
424 pp, 56 illus. colour and b&w.
Paperback € 33,66 (without IVA).
ISBN 9788415245711
Twenty essays from the proceedings of the International Congress on Saint Teresa of Avila, held in 2015 at the Universidad Complutense in Madrid. Essays include ones relating to artists associated with the saint and to the vision of women in Teresian literature, and a bibliographical appendix of all the principal works on Teresian literature from her own to the present day.

AAH CONFERENCE – ORIENTALISM & SPAIN IN THE 19 & 20TH CENTURIES – 7-9 APRIL 2016 – UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH

AAH2016 Annual Conference and Bookfair
University of Edinburgh
7 – 9 April 2016

ORIENTALISM & SPAIN IN THE 19TH & 20TH CENTURIES

Convenors:
Claudia Hopkins, University of Edinburgh, c.hopkins@ed.ac.uk
Anna McSweeney, SOAS, University of London, am105@soas.ac.uk

Spain represents a unique and fertile context in which to explore attitudes to the art and culture of the Islamic world. Spain was routinely ‘orientalised’ by northern European cultures in the 19th century, as foreign visitors indulged in oriental reveries when reflecting on Spain’s Islamic past (711–1492) and admiring its ‘Moorish’ remains at the Alhambra palace in Granada, the mosque/cathedral in Cordoba, or the Giralda in Seville. For the Spaniard, however, this Islamic heritage raised potentially disorientating questions about cultural roots and national identity. Spanish attitudes to the Islamic past were further complicated by Spain’s ambivalent relations with the Islamic present in Morocco, ranging from war and conflict (1859–60) to Franco’s recruitment of Moroccans at the start of the Spanish Civil War.

This session builds on recent research by historians of art, literature and culture, whose work has revealed that the European discourse on the Islamic world is much more polyphonic than traditional postcolonial theory assumed. The session invites papers that examine 19th- and 20-century visual responses to Spain’s Islamic past and Spain’s nearest ‘Orient’, Morocco, by both Spanish and non-Spanish artists across all media (architecture, fine art, illustrated books, photography, film, fashion etc.). How did artists translate Spain’s Islamic world into visual formats? How was such imagery produced, viewed, and marketed? What were the artistic, ideological, political, and social positions on which visual responses were grounded? How important were they in the formation of broader attitudes to the Islamic world?

Email paper propsals to the session convenor(s) by 9 November 2015. Download a Paper Proposal Guidelines

– See more at: http://www.aah.org.uk/annual-conference/sessions2016/session21#sthash.CunhcXx5.dpuf

First Durham-Northumbria Colloquium on Medieval and Golden Age Hispanic Studies, 9-10 July 2015

2015-02-Durham-Northumbria-Conference
First Durham-Northumbria Colloquium on Medieval and Golden Age Hispanic Studies
Primer Coloquio de Estudios Hispánicos Medievales y del Siglo de Oro (Universidades de Durham y de Northumbria)

Registration is now open.

Venue: Northumbria University (Newcastle upon Tyne), Sutherland Building
Date: 9-10 July 2015

Programme: 2015-06-FirstDurhamNorthumbria MedievalGoldenAgeProgramme

 

 

CFP: Revising the Hispanic Canon. Visibility and Cultural Capital at the Margins

2015-04-HispanicCanonCFP-wordle
CFP: Revising the Hispanic Canon. Visibility and Cultural Capital at the Margins

Deadline: 13 May 2015

In recent years, meta-critical studies such as Ideologies of Hispanism (2005), Spain Beyond Spain (2005), Reading Iberia (2007), Un hispanismo para el siglo XXI (2011) and Iberian Modalities (2013) have sought to uncover the ideological discourses underlying Hispanic Studies and trace its historical evolution in order to elucidate how the discipline might or ought to evolve, if it is to remain relevant in a context in which national, linguistic and disciplinary boundaries have become problematized. The present volume, co-edited by Stuart Davis and Maite Usoz de la Fuente, seeks to contribute to this ongoing debate by considering how the work of PhD students and early career researchers in Hispanic Studies reflects and contributes to the expansion and the blurring of disciplinary limits.
In a broad sense, the duty of every new generation of scholars in any arts and humanities discipline is to encourage a revision of the canon within that discipline and, in the process, to contribute to a redefinition of the discipline itself. This is an exciting enterprise, but it is not without its challenges and pitfalls. Amongst them is the question of how to attain visibility when working on a topic that is little known, or considered a niche area within one’s discipline, or how to position one’s work if undertaking inter- or multidisciplinary research that surpasses disciplinary boundaries. The aim of this book is to offer a useful overview of new research in Hispanic Studies by a selection of emerging scholars, and to reflect upon questions of canonicity, visibility and cultural capital, and the ways in which such notions span and contribute to shape our field of study.
Contributions to this volume are welcome from doctoral students and early career researchers (understood as those who have obtained their doctoral degree within the past seven years) whose work focuses on (but may not be limited to) the following areas:

  • Hispanism beyond Spain and Latin America: North Africa, the Philippines, and Guinea
  • Interdisciplinary crossroads: comparative and multidisciplinary approaches to Hispanic texts
  • The role of visual and popular culture within Hispanic Studies
  • Other languages and cultures (non-Castilian languages and cultures of Spain and Latin America)
  • Going against the grain: Paradigm-shifting revisions of the canon
  • New methodological approaches to canonical texts

If you want to contribute to this volume, please send an abstract of no more than 300 words to hispanic.canon@gmail.com by 13 May 2015, accompanied by a short biography including your name, institutional affiliation and areas of research (2-3 lines). Selected contributors will be contacted by 30 May 2015 and the deadline for submission of essays will be 31 December 2015.

CFP: First Durham-Northumbria Colloquium on Medieval and Golden Age Hispanic Studies, 9-10 July 2015

2015-02-Durham-Northumbria-ConferenceCall for Papers/Convocatoria:
First Durham-Northumbria Colloquium on Medieval and Golden Age Hispanic Studies
Primer Coloquio de Estudios Hispánicos Medievales y del Siglo de Oro (Universidades de Durham y de Northumbria)

Venue: Northumbria University (Newcastle upon Tyne), Sutherland Building
Date: 9-10 July 2015
Deadline 30 April 2015
Contact: Carlos Conde Solares: carlos.solares@northumbria.ac.uk; Lesley Twomey: lesley.twomey@northumbria.ac.uk; or Andy Beresford: a.m.beresford@durham.ac.uk

Individual papers as well as panel proposals are invited on any Hispanic Medieval or Golden Age topic, including the following:

  • Hispanic Poetry (1250-1650);
  • Peninsular Art (1200-1700);
  • Aspects of Hagiography (1250-1650);
  • Spirituality in Spain (1250-1650);
  • History of Spain (1300-1700);
  • Spain and Europe (1300-1650);
  • Women readers and writers (1300-1700);
  • Spanish fashion history, textiles, and clothing (1400-1700)Se convocan ponencias sobre cualquier tema hispanomedieval o del Siglo de Oro, incluyendo los siguientes:
    Poesía hispánica (1250-1650); arte peninsular (1200-1700); literatura hagiográfica (1250-1650); la espiritualidad en España (1250-1650); temas historiográficos (1300-1700); España en el contexto europeo (1300-1650); la indumentaria, la moda, y los textiles (1400-1700); las lectoras y las escritoras (1300-1700)