Monthly Archives: October 2014

Magistri Cataloniae, Barcelona, 7-8 November 2014

ARTES

2014-09-MagistriCataloniae
I simposi Magistri Cataloniae: artista anònim, artista amb signatura: Identitat, estatus i rol de l’artista en l’art medieval. (Part of the research project Artistas, patronos y público: Cataluña y el Mediterráneo: Siglos XI-XV.)
Barcelona,  Departament d’Art i de Musicologia, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 7-8 November 2014.

Programme

Registration is now open.

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Hispanic Visual Culture Essay Prize: Deadline 15th February

Artes logoSpanish embassy logo
***Juan Facundo Riaño Essay Medal: Call for Submissions. Deadline 15th February***
To encourage emerging scholars, ARTES (the Iberian and Latin American Visual Culture Group) awards an annual essay medal to the author of the best essay on the art, architecture or visual culture of the Hispanic world. The winner is also awarded a cash prize of £400, and the runner-up is awarded a certificate and prize of £100. Prize-winners receive a year’s free membership to ARTES, and the winning essays are considered for publication in the annual visual arts issue of the peer-reviewed Hispanic Research Journal.
ARTES welcomes submissions from researchers in a variety of circumstances, but envisages that most essays will be submitted from early career scholars, post-graduate students or undergraduates with exceptionally good end-of-degree dissertations. They must have some connection with the UK.
See www.artes-uk.org/awards for full details.

New England / New Spain: Portraiture in the Colonial Americas, 1492-1850, Denver, January 2015

2014-10-DenverSympo-01-2015
New England / New Spain: Portraiture in the Colonial Americas, 1492-1850, Symposium, Frederick + Jan Mayer Centre, Denver Art Museum, 23-24 January 2015.
Each year, the Denver Art Museum hosts a two-day symposium on a New World topic, alternating between a Pre-Columbian theme one year and a colonial Spanish theme the next year. The 2014 symposium, which has been edged into early 2015, is co-organized by Dr. Donna Pierce, the museum’s curator of Spanish colonial art.
Speakers: Michael A. Brown, Elizabeth Mankin Kornhauser, Clare Kunny, Karl Kusserow, James Middleton, Paula Mues Orts, Susan Rather, Michael J. Schreffler, Jennifer Van Horn, Kaylin Haverstock Weber.
Attendees will also be able to view the recently opened exhibition Glitterati: Portraits and Jewelry from Colonial Latin America.

Medieval Hispanic Research Seminar, London, 2014-2015

2014-10-QueenMaryULondonMedieval Hispanic Research Seminar, Queen Mary, University of London, Programme for 2014-2015.
The Research Seminar meets on Fridays at 3pm in room 1.36 of the Arts One Building, Mile End Campus. Papers last 45 minutes and are preceded by tea in The Gallery and followed by discussion.
Semester 1

Friday 21st November 2014 Kati Ihnat, University of Bristol ‘Mother of the Visigothic “Nation”: The Virgin Mary in Early Medieval Iberia’

Friday 12th December 2014 Francisco Bautista, Universidad de Salamanca/University of Cambridge ‘Don Juan Manuel y la herencia literaria de Alfonso X’

Semester 2

Friday 23rd January 2015 Aengus Ward, University of Birmingham ‘Digital editing and the Estoria de Espanna: of xml and crowdsourcers’

Friday 27th February 2015 Sizen Yiacoup, University of Liverpool ‘Movement, Stasis and the Translation of Power in El Viaje de Turquía

Friday 6th March 2015 Rosanna Cantavella, Universitat de València/University of Cambridge ‘The concept of “worthy rhymes” within the Troubadour poetic tradition’

Friday 27th March 2015 Rachel Scott, QMUL ‘“Esenta y señora”: The Paradox of the Prostitute in Celestina’

The Fitzwilliam Museum’s fundraising drive to acquire a Mater Dolorosa by Pedro de Mena proves successful

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Pedro de Mena’s Virgin of Sorrows (Mater Dolorosa) saved by public appeal

In another example of public philanthropy, the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge has acquired a the Mater Dolorosa (Virgin of Sorrows) by Pedro de Mena. The acquisition had been supported by grants of £30,000 from the Art Fund and £10,000 from The Henry Moore Foundation plus an astonishing £85,000 from the public appeal.

Tim Knox, Director of the Fitzwilliam, said, ‘This has been right to the wire, and every single penny has counted. Our sincere thanks go out to all who donated towards the appeal: you have helped secure an important and beautiful work of art for the nation’. Described as ‘mesmerisingly beautiful, with gently furrowed brows and natural flesh tones’, the bust was probably created for a private chapel, study or bedchamber and might originally have been paired with a similarly-sized bust of the Ecce Homo (Christ as the Man of Sorrows).

Pedro de Mena was taught the art of wood carving by his father, Alonso de Mena (1587—1646), a well-regarded sculptor of traditional religious images in Granada. Following his father’s death, the eighteen-year-old Pedro took over the workshop and was joined by established artist Alonso Cano (1601-67), who taught him how to paint sculpture realistically. As a result, Mena’s statues and busts have a remarkable lifelike quality. Mena left Granada in 1658 and spent the rest of his career in Málaga. He was well regarded by prestigious patrons from church and state and known for his religiosity, for which he was appointed censor of images by the Inquisition in Granada and Málaga.

Association of Art Historians – Annual Conference April 2015 – Call for Papers – Deadline 10 November 2014

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AAH2015
41st Annual Conference & Bookfair
Sainsbury Institute for Art, UEA, Norwich
9 – 11 April 2015

Portraiture and the Unworthy Subject in the Early Modern World

Paper proposals, to be sent to the session convenor in accordance with proposal guidelines.

Paper proposal deadline: 10 November 2014

Session convenor: Carmen Fracchia, Birkbeck, University of London, c.fracchia@bbk.ac.uk

In the early modern period, the production of portraiture was governed by restrictive conventions. According to the first European treatise on portraiture since antiquity (Francisco de Holanda’s Do tirar polo natural [On Taking Portraits from Life], 1548), the essence of the genre was the worthy sitter’s moral or intellectual prestige. Thus, the main function of the portrait image was to immortalise the worthy elite, with the implicit moral understanding that there could be no room for the portrayal of the unworthy subject. What are the political and visual implications of this belief about portraiture? What are the notions of human diversity that prevent the portrayal of undeserving subjects? How are these concepts negotiated in the production of the portrait image outside Europe?

This session aims to build on research by historians of art, literature and the colonial world, and work on slave narratives that illuminate the paradoxical nature of ‘slave portraits’ in the Atlantic World. It intends to explore a wider spectrum of what were considered ‘unworthy subjects’, and the complexity of the mutually exclusive categories of ‘portraiture’ and ‘undeserving subject’. It also seeks to tackle the oxymoronic categories of ‘self-portraiture’ and ‘unworthy subject’, and investigate how notions of human diversity might challenge the boundaries of traditional portraiture and self-portraiture.

Contributions are invited that address the portrayal of ‘undeserving people’ across different media and cultures in the early modern world, as well as the historical context of social inferiority and the ‘undeserving’ between the 15th and the 18th centuries.
– See more at: http://www.aah.org.uk/annual-conference/sessions2015/session24#sthash.8VY0zg3x.dpuf

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Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez
Portrait of Juan de Pareja, 1650
oil on canvas
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

Spanish Art Symposium – Auckland Castle, The Bowes Museum & Durham University – Thursday 23 October to Saturday 25 October 2014

A symposium on Spanish Art will take place from 23-25 October in Co Durham, highlighting collections in the area and launching a book on treasures of Spanish Art in Country Durham. The three-day event will include exclusive access to view Zurbarán’s Jacob and his Twelve Sons and a conference dinner at Auckland Castle.

Below is a provisional programme for the event (the pdf is available here: Spanish Art Symposium Programme – Co Durham – 23-25 Oct 2014

To book a place, or for further information, please contact:

Rosie Bradford
Groups and Events Co-ordinator
The Bowes Museum

symposium@thebowesmuseum.org.uk
01833 694615

Thursday 23 October 2014
Auckland Castle, Market Place, Bishop Auckland, County Durham, DL14 7NR

Auckland Castle

Friday 24 October 2014
The Bowes Museum, Barnard Castle, County Durham, DL12 8NP

Bowes Museum Barnard Castle County Durham

Saturday 25 October 2014
Palace Green, Durham University, Durham, County Durham, DH1 3RN

Palace Green University of Durham

Jointly organised by Auckland Castle, The Bowes Museum, and Durham University, this three-day symposium aims to highlight the outstanding collections of Spanish art held in County Durham. Internationally renowned academics and museum professionals will present a wide range of papers that will place these significant collections within their artistic, cultural, and historic context. The symposium will also be an opportunity to consider the reception of seventeenth-century Spanish art in Britain, marking the bicentenary of the arrival of Velázquez’s The Rokeby Venus in Teesdale (now in the National Gallery, London).

County Durham has historically been a hot spot for the collection and display of Spanish art, which fascinated influential figures such as Bishop Richard Trevor, John and Joséphine Bowes, and Frank Hall Standish. Today the results of this interest are to be found in the collections at The Bowes Museum and Auckland Castle, which together represent the most significant UK holdings of Spanish Golden Age art outside of London.

The symposium heralds a wider, long-term vision shared by Auckland Castle, The Bowes Museum, and Durham University, to establish County Durham as a centre for the study of Spanish art in the UK, and as a world-class visitor destination.

El Greco, 1580-1589, The Tears of St Peter, ooc, The Bowes Museum, Castle Barnard, Co Durham

El Greco (1541-1641), The Tears of St Peter, 1580-1589, oil on canvas, The Bowes Museum

PROGRAMME

23 October 2014
Auckland Castle

09.30 – 10.00   Registration
10.00 – 10.30
Welcome Remarks
Jonathan Ruffer, Chairman of the Auckland Castle Trust
10.30 – 11.30
Zurbarán and Britain (Title TBC)
Gabriele Finaldi, Associate Director of Curatorship and Research, the Museo del Prado, Madrid
11.30 – 12.00   Coffee Break
12.00 – 13.00
Francisco de Zurbarán’s representations of Saint Francis in the National Gallery
Letizia Treves, Curator of Italian and Spanish Paintings 1600-1800, The National Gallery, London
13.00 – 14.30   Lunch – Tours of proposed Spanish Art Gallery site in Bishop Auckland Market Place
14.30 – 15.30
The Sons of Jacob: the first dysfunctional family why did Zurbarán paint them?
Alastair Laing, former Curator of Pictures and Sculpture, The National Trust
Thomas Gainsborough’s response to the work of Spanish masters
Anthony Mould, Fine Art Agent and Dealer specialising in British Art
15.30 – 16.00   Refreshments
16.00 – 17.00
The Museo del Prado and the visual construction 
of the history of Spanish painting in the nineteenth century
Javier Portús, Senior Curator of Spanish Painting, Museo del Prado, Madrid
17.00 – 17.45     Concluding Remarks
18.00 – 19.00     Drinks Reception and Book Launch
19.00 – 22.00     Conference Dinner                            

Francisco de Zurbarán, Levi, oil on canvas, Auckland Castle

Francisco de Zurbarán (1598-1664), Levi, 1640-45, oil on canvas, Auckland Castle, Bishop Auckland, Co Durham

24 October 2014
The Bowes Museum

09.30 – 09.45
Welcome and Introduction
Adrian Jenkins, Director of The Bowes Museum
09.45 – 10.25
Art collecting as a language of friendship and affinity between England and Spain
during the seventeenth century
Toby Osborne, Senior Lecturer in History, Durham University
10.25 – 11.05
Spanish masters and the spoils of war: the circulation of Spanish art in the era of Napoleon
Tom Stammers, Lecturer in History, Durham University
11.05 – 11.30   Coffee Break
11.30 – 12.10    
Preliminary thoughts on materiality and spirituality in the works of Francisco de Zurbarán 

Cordula van Whye, Lecturer in History of Art, University of York
12.10 – 12.50
Madrid’s monastic, artistic, and cultural heritage before the Confiscation of 1835. Report by the Royal Academy of Fine Arts of San Fernando
Itziar Aranna, Research Fellow, Academia de San Fernando,
12.50 – 14.00   Lunch – optional tours of the Museum
14.00 – 14.30
Frank Hall Standish (1799-1840), Collector of Durham, Duxbury and Seville
Howard Coutts, Keeper of Ceramics, The Bowes Museum
14.30 – 15.00
Frank Hall Standish and his paintings acquisitions in Seville
Xanthe Brooke, Senior Curator (Continental European Fine Art), Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool
15.00 – 15.40
John Bowes and the sale of the Quinto Collection: an opportunity or a question of taste?
Véronique Gérard Powell, Senior Lecturer (Honorary) University of Paris-Sorbonne
15.40 – 16.15   Tea Break
16.15 – 16.45   Closing Remarks
17.00 – 18.00   Tours of Picture Gallery and Exhibition
18.00 – 22.00   Drinks Reception and Conference Dinner

(c) The Bowes Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

José Antolínez, The Immaculate Conception, oil on canvas, The Bowes Museum, Castle Barnard, Co Durham

25 October 2014
Durham University

09.30 ‒ 09.45   Arrival and Coffee
09.45 ‒ 10.15     
Sugar and spice and all things nice: José Antolínez and the Immaculate Virgin of the Bowes Museum

Lesley K. Twomey, Reader in Medieval and Golden Age Iberian Art, University of Northumbria
10.15 ‒ 10.45
Sacred skin: the martyrdom of St Bartholomew in Spanish Golden Age art
Andy Beresford, Professor of Spanish, Durham University
10.45 ‒ 11.10   Coffee Break
11.10 ‒ 11.40
The art of Seville and the collection of a scholar: Stirling Maxwell and the Fiestas de Sevilla
Hilary Macartney, Lecturer in Hispanic Art, University of Glasgow
11.40 ‒ 12.10
In the wake of Colonna and Mitelli: Quadratura in the Court of the Last Habsburg
Jeremy Robbins, Forbes Chair of Spanish, University of Edinburgh
12.10 ‒ 12.40
Spanish art and the Catholic Revival in Britain
Stefano Cracolici, Reader in Italian, Durham University
12.40 ‒ 13.30    Lunch
13.30 ‒ 14.30    Round Table Discussion
‘Engaging public interest in Spanish religious art’
14.45 ‒ 15.30    Optional Tour of Durham Castle Collection

(c) Durham University; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Unknown artist, St Jerome, oil on canvas, Durham Castle Collection