Monthly Archives: May 2015

ARTES Private Visit – Xavier Bray – the Dulwich Picture Gallery – Mon 29 June 2015

ARTES Visit

Xavier Bray

at

The Dulwich Picture Gallery

Dulwich

The Spanish Paintings & the newly opened Prud’hon Exhibition

Monday 29 June 2015

1.30 – 4.30 pm

Xavier Bray -

Timetable

  1.30: Talk by Xavier Bray

  2.15: ARTES AGM

  3.15: Tea

  3.30: Tour of the Spanish paintings & the Prud’hon exhibition

prudhon-cara

If you would like to attend, please contact Morlin artesiberia@gmail.com.
Guests of members are welcome (£10 per person payable on the day).
Membership of ARTES is £35 and £20 for students. More information and a membership form can be found under the Join Us tab above.

Please note: this event includes the ARTES AGM. Guests are welcome.

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ARTES Visit to the Barber Institute & the Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery – Mon 6 July 2015

ARTES Visit to Birmingham

The Barber Institute of Art &
The Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery (BMAG)

(c) The Barber Institute of Fine Arts; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

After Velázquez, Mariana of Austria, wife of Philip IV

(c) The Barber Institute of Fine Arts; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, The Marriage Feast at Cana

Monday 6 July 2015
11.00 – 16.30 pm

This visit is at the kind invitation of Robert Wenley of the Barber Institute who will introduce the key Spanish works. Helen Hillyard, National Gallery Curatorial Trainee at the BMAG, will also give us an introduction to her display and its Spanish works. 

Provisional Timetable
11.00 – Arrive at the Barber for Tea & Coffee
11.30 – Look at key Spanish works in the Barber collection and explore the galleries
13.30 – Leave for Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery and lunch
15.00 – Look at the Spanish works in the Birmingham Museum
& Art Gallery collection and explore the galleries
16.30 – Day finishes

If you would like to attend this events, please contact Morlin at artesiberia@gmail.com. This event is free for members. There will be a charge for guests of £10 (payable on the day)
Membership of ARTES is £35 and £20 for students. For more information and membership forms to download and send, go to the Join Us tab above.

ARTES Visit – Exhibition – El Greco at the National Gallery – 18 June 2015

ARTES Members Private Visit

EL GRECO Adoration in the Name of Jesus

The National Gallery London 

El Greco at the National Gallery

Thursday 18 June 2015

8.50 am – 10.00 am (meeting at West Entrance)

This visit is at the kind invitation of Curator Letizia Treves of the National Gallery will be talking about the El Greco display. She will be joined by Xavier Bray from the Dulwich Picture Gallery will be talking about El Greco’s interest in sculpture and by Véronique Gerard Powell will be talking about the Louvre Crucifixion.

Please note, numbers for this event are limited. If you would like to attend or are interested in membership , please contact Morlin at artesiberia@gmail.com . While this visit is free for ARTES members, there will be a charge for guests.

CFP: Art and Experience in 15th Century Naples: Renaissance Society of America, Boston 2016

62nd Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America
Boston, 31 March–2 April 2016
Park Plaza Hotel and Hynes Convention Center

2015-05-Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston

Call for Papers: Art and Experience in 15th Century Naples: Defining an Artistic Center
(Deadline: May 31, 2015)
This panel investigates critical questions surrounding the study of fifteenth-century Neapolitan art. We invite papers that explore questions as fundamental as:

  • What is Neapolitan art?
  • Who were the predominant artists and patrons of the period?
  • What were the social and political functions of art in Quattrocento Naples and in what respect did they differ from those of other centers?
  • What was the relationship between court and city in the Aragonese period and what relevance did it have for the production of art?
  • Was there a conception of “napolitanità” in the fifteenth century, and if so, can it be linked to distinctive artistic styles, forms and types?

More specifically:

  • How did artists working in Naples handle the importation of foreign models, and which visual elements were adapted, translated, or dismissed during this process?
  • In what ways did Neapolitan art and artists participate in global networks of artistic exchange, and how did these trans-regional interactions impact material culture at home and abroad?
  • In what way does Naples challenge traditional art historical concepts and narratives such as “school” or “Renaissance”?

By 31 May please submit a paper title, 150-word abstract (preferably including an image), keywords, and a 300-word curriculum vitae to both organizers, Nicole Riesenberger (nriesenb@umd.edu) and Adrian Bremenkamp (adrian19@zedat.fu-berlin.de).

 

CFP: Framing the Renaissance in the 21st Century: Renaissance Society of America, Boston 2016

62nd Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America
Boston, 31 March–2 April 2016
Park Plaza Hotel and Hynes Convention Center

2015-05-Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston

Call for Papers: Framing the Renaissance in the 21st Century
(Deadline: June 5, 2015)
Claire Farago’s 1995 edited volume, Reframing the Renaissance, has had a tremendous impact on the field of early modern art history. On the 21st anniversary of its publication, we invite scholars to reflect on its role in transforming the way we approach the visual cultures of the early modern world. We are interested in papers that address the ways Reframing has helped precipitate broader historiographical, geographical, and pedagogical reformulations of the “Global Renaissance” and contemporaneous visual cultures. What challenges do we still face in writing histories of art produced within the contexts of exploration, conquest, colonialism, and imperialism? How can we enhance our methodologies to approach art historical phenomena beyond the inhibiting geopolitical constructs of nation states, or even continents? If the Renaissance was “Reframed” in 1995, which qualifier would we use in 2016: Globalized? Decentered? Decolonized? We invite scholars from different generations and subdisciplines to offer insights on the ways that Reframing the Renaissance has changed the field as we know it and to expand its applicability to new scholarly arenas.

Please send a 150-word abstract and a 300-word CV to Eloise Quiñones Keber (equinones213@gmail.com) and Ananda Cohen Suarez (aic42@cornell.edu) by June 5, 2015.

 

CFP: Beyond the Wanderjahr: Microhistories of artistic travel in Renaissance Europe: Renaissance Society of America, Boston 2016

62nd Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America
Boston, 31 March–2 April 2016
Park Plaza Hotel and Hynes Convention Center

2015-05-Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston

CFP: Beyond the Wanderjahr: Microhistories of artistic travel in Renaissance Europe
(Deadline: June 6, 2015)
Recent scholarship has emphasized the extent to which works of art circulated in fifteenth- and early-sixteenth-century Europe, but the movements of individual artists, less tangible and less easily categorized as an aggregate whole, bear witness to exchange and dialogue at a more localized level. Beyond the famous examples of individual travellers crossing the Alps (Fouquet, Dürer, Gossaert, Van Heemskerck), many lesser-known cases of peripatetic displacement occurred, motivated by a variety of concerns beyond the nebulous desire to explore new areas for proto-touristic or proto-art-historical reasons. The diplomatic excursions of Jan van Eyck to Portugal and Gentile Bellini to Istanbul are well-known, but how do the seemingly erratic circulations of Michel Sittow (from Tallinn to Flanders to Denmark to Toledo), Aristotile Fioravanti (from Bologna to Moscow) or Nicolò Brancaleon (from Venice to Ethiopia) confirm or challenge received notions of center versus periphery, heartland versus hinterland? Furthermore, how can physical evidence of artistic travel by anonymous craftsmen (masons, sculptors, weavers, armorers) be addressed by a discipline still deeply inflected by its commitment to Grand Tour geopolitics and the North/South divide? How did artists themselves perceive geographical and political boundaries, and how can lesser-known instances of individual travel across broader geographic distances be appreciated both as unique events and as indices of wider concerns? Returning to the individual narrative, this session seeks to “ask large questions in small places” by examining the lived realities of artists’ journeys in Renaissance Europe.

Please submit proposals electronically to Nicholas Herman (nicholas.herman@umontreal.ca) and Susie Nash (susie.nash@courtauld.ac.uk) by June 6th, 2015.

Proposals should include the paper title, a short abstract (150 word maximum), and a brief curriculum vitae (300 word maximum).

 

CFP: Questioning the concept of Mudejar Architecture

Mudejar Roof, Teruel Cathedral

Mudejar Roof, Teruel Cathedral (Photo credit: Jose Luis Filpo Cabana. Licensed under GFDL via Wikimedia Commons)

QUESTIONING THE CONCEPT OF MUDÉJAR ARCHITECTURE

Society of Architectural Historians
SAH 69th Annual International Conference, Pasadena/LA, April 6 – 10, 2016
Call for Papers: Questioning the concept of Mudejar Architecture
Deadline: Jun 9, 2015

Medieval exchange processes between Muslim Spain, the northern Christian kingdoms and the Sephardic Jews created a specific building style in the Iberian Peninsula. On the occasion of his inaugural lecture El estilo Mudéjar en arquitectura, held in 1859 at the Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando, José Amador de los Ríos named this specific style Mudéjar, a term used in the academic literature till this day. The transmission of a historical term designating a specific population group (i.e. Muslims in Christian territories) into architectural history induces a terminological grey area. When did the term Mudéjar appear in historical records, i.e., was it already used in Pre-Modern times as a category for demarcation? Where shall we draw the frontiers between Islamic, Mudéjar, Christian and Jewish Architecture? Which are the determining factors that feature a building as Mudéjar? Is it the confession of the patron or that of the craftsman, the functional aspect (church, synagogue) or the stylistic feature that permits a classification? How do we relate a Mudéjar building to Mudéjar population? What is the role of the patron and/or the craftsman in modifying Islamic patterns into a Christian or Jewish language?
The interdisciplinary approach (Art History/Historical Sciences) of the session will allow a critical debate on the concept of Mudéjar Architecture, which has recently been questioned in the work Under the influence: Questioning the Comparative in Medieval Castile (Leiden, 2005). We encourage the submission of specific case studies that will permit to simultaneously highlight the complexity of cross-border processes and question the compatibility with the current field boundaries, while emphasizing the significance of the Iberian Peninsula as a cultural contact zone within the current international globalization discourse.
Session chairs: Francine Giese, University of Zurich; francine.giese@khist.uzh.ch; and Ana Echevarría Arsuaga, UNED Madrid; aechevarria@geo.uned.es.
Please submit abstracts (no more than 300 words) via the online submission portal by June 9, 2015.2015-05-sah-2016-annual-international-conference-logo