Tag Archives: Exhibition

ARTES Event: Curator’s Tour of ‘Ribera: Art of Violence,’ at Dulwich Picture Gallery, 28 September 2018

ribera-apollo-and-marsyas-banner

ARTES members are invited to join ARTES’s committee member Dr Edward Payne for a special tour of the exhibition Ribera: Art of Violence at Dulwich Picture Gallery, co-curated by Edward and ARTES member Dr Xavier Bray.

The curator-led tour will take place in the morning of Friday 28 September. The event will run as follows:

9.00–9.15 Coffee and welcome at Gail’s, 91 Dulwich Village, London SE21 7BJ, UK

9.15–9.45 Introduction: Why Ribera? Why violence? Why Dulwich Picture Gallery?

9.45–10.00 Private viewing of the exhibition at Dulwich Picture Gallery (doors open to the general public at 10.00)

10.00–11.30 Curator-led tour of the exhibition followed by Q&A and general discussion

This event is free but spaces are limited. Please write to artesiberia@gmail.com to book your place.

01613386710_h-british-museum-cropped-large-banner

Ribera: Art of Violence is the first exhibition in the UK dedicated to the Spanish Baroque painter, draughtsman and printmaker Jusepe de Ribera (1591–1652). Born in Játiva, Valencia, Ribera emigrated to Italy as a young artist. Proud of his Spanish heritage, he eventually settled in Naples, then a Spanish territory, but never again returned to Spain. A hybrid figure, Ribera had a significant influence on the art of both countries in the seventeenth century.

Introducing this artist to a UK audience, the exhibition will focus on some of Ribera’s most powerful images featuring saints and sinners, flaying and flogging. Ribera’s images of pain have often been described as shocking and even grotesque in their realism. In a common historiographical trope, the artist himself has been labelled as sadistic and violent. Challenging this long-standing interpretation, Ribera: Art of Violence will reveal the complex artistic, religious and cultural discourses underpinning the artist’s violent imagery in paint and on paper. This exploration will be anchored by a number of major loans from North American and European collections, with some works travelling to the UK for the first time.

Click here for more information about the exhibition and related events.

 

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1 week to go! ‘Ribera: Art of Violence’ opens 26 September 2018 at Dulwich Picture Gallery, London

ribera-martiri-de-sant-bartomeu-large-bannerThis autumn, Dulwich Picture Gallery will present the first exhibition in the UK dedicated to the Spanish Baroque painter, draughtsman and printmaker Jusepe de Ribera (1591–1652). Born in Játiva, Valencia, Ribera emigrated to Italy as a young artist. Proud of his Spanish heritage, he eventually settled in Naples, then a Spanish territory, but never again returned to Spain. A hybrid figure, Ribera had a significant influence on the art of both countries in the seventeenth century.

Introducing this artist to a UK audience, the exhibition will focus on some of Ribera’s most powerful images featuring saints and sinners, flaying and flogging. Ribera’s images of pain have often been described as shocking and even grotesque in their realism. In a common historiographical trope, the artist himself has been labelled as sadistic and violent. Challenging this long-standing interpretation, Ribera: Art of Violence will reveal the complex artistic, religious and cultural discourses underpinning the artist’s violent imagery in paint and on paper. This exploration will be anchored by a number of major loans from North American and European collections, with some works travelling to the UK for the first time.

613cmo6qaylA scholarly catalogue will accompany the exhibition, showcasing the new research which has informed the display.

Ribera: Art of Violence is co-curated by ARTES committee member Dr Edward Payne, author of a PhD thesis on the theme of violence in Ribera’s art (2012) and contributor to the catalogue raisonné of Ribera’s drawings (2016), and Dr Xavier Bray (Director, The Wallace Collection), former Arturo and Holly Melosi Chief Curator at Dulwich Picture Gallery, and curator of the National Gallery’s exhibitions The Sacred Made Real: Spanish Painting and Sculpture 1600–1700 (2009) and Goya: The Portraits (2015).

The exhibition will be accompanied by an exciting series of events, from an international study day to Animalisa contemporary dance performance. Here is a selection of the most interesting…

  • Ribera: Curator’s Introduction with Dr Edward Payne, 27 September 2018, 12.30pm–1.30pm
  • Skin Deepa workshop on tattoos and skin art led by Dr Matt Lodder, tattoo historian, and Alex Binnie, tattoo artist. 19 October 2018, 7–9.30pm
  • From the Collection: The Aftermath of Violencea journey through shock, grief, acceptance and healing, led by Jennifer Scott, The Sackler Director of Dulwich Picture Gallery, and based on works by Carlo Dolci, Rubens, Van Dyck and Poussin in the Gallery’s collection. 2 November 2018, 12.30–1.30pm
  •  Ribera: Curator’s Introduction with Dr Xavier Bray, 8 November 2018, 7.30pm–8.30pm
  • Beneath The Skin of Ribera’s Bodiesa lecture by Dr Jack Hartnell, Lecturer in Art History at the University of East Anglia. The lecture will reveal the complex and fascinating ways in which the people of the Middle Ages thought about, explored and experienced their physical selves. 30 November 2018, 12.30pm–1.30pm
  • Ribera Study Day, a day of in-depth discussions around the role of violence in art, which will bring together a range of multi-disciplined creative and scholarly minds to prod, probe and discuss profound questions exploring the many facets of Ribera’s work. 10 December 2018, 2.00pm–5.00pm
  • Art and Violence in Renaissance Florence, a lecture by Dr Scott Nethersole, Senior Lecturer in Italian Renaissance Art at The Courtauld Institute of Art in London. This event will explore the relationship between art and violence in 15th-century Florence, exposing the underbelly of a period more often celebrated for enlightened and progressive ideas. 18 January 2019, 12.30–1.30pm

And last but not least, a curator-led tour for ARTES members, which will take place on 28 September 2018 from 9.00am.

Featured Exhibition: Plata de los Andes, Museo de Arte de Lima, until 28 October

minis_armadillo

Armadillo-shaped perfumer
c. 1825-1830
silver
38,7 x 31,3 x 20 cm
Colección Ferrand, Lima

This exhibition showcases five centuries of Andean silver-work through more than 350 silver pieces, dating from the conquest to the 20th century.  Curated by Ricardo Kusunoki and Eduardo Wuffarden, this major show is a unique occasion to see works never previously displayed to the public, from ecclesiastical, private and public collections in Lima, Cuzco, Arequipa and elsewhere in the country.

Click here for more information.

ARTES Event: Curator’s Tour of ‘Ribera: Art of Violence,’ at Dulwich Picture Gallery, 28 September 2018

ribera-apollo-and-marsyas-banner

ARTES members are invited to join ARTES’s committee member Dr Edward Payne for a special tour of the exhibition Ribera: Art of Violence at Dulwich Picture Gallery, co-curated by Edward and ARTES member Dr Xavier Bray.

The curator-led tour will take place in the morning of Friday 28 September. The event will run as follows:

9.00–9.15 Coffee and welcome at Gail’s, 91 Dulwich Village, London SE21 7BJ, UK

9.15–9.45 Introduction: Why Ribera? Why violence? Why Dulwich Picture Gallery?

9.45–10.00 Private viewing of the exhibition at Dulwich Picture Gallery (doors open to the general public at 10.00)

10.00–11.30 Curator-led tour of the exhibition followed by Q&A and general discussion

This event is free but spaces are limited. Please write to artesiberia@gmail.com to book your place.

01613386710_h-british-museum-cropped-large-banner

Ribera: Art of Violence is the first exhibition in the UK dedicated to the Spanish Baroque painter, draughtsman and printmaker Jusepe de Ribera (1591–1652). Born in Játiva, Valencia, Ribera emigrated to Italy as a young artist. Proud of his Spanish heritage, he eventually settled in Naples, then a Spanish territory, but never again returned to Spain. A hybrid figure, Ribera had a significant influence on the art of both countries in the seventeenth century.

Introducing this artist to a UK audience, the exhibition will focus on some of Ribera’s most powerful images featuring saints and sinners, flaying and flogging. Ribera’s images of pain have often been described as shocking and even grotesque in their realism. In a common historiographical trope, the artist himself has been labelled as sadistic and violent. Challenging this long-standing interpretation, Ribera: Art of Violence will reveal the complex artistic, religious and cultural discourses underpinning the artist’s violent imagery in paint and on paper. This exploration will be anchored by a number of major loans from North American and European collections, with some works travelling to the UK for the first time.

Click here for more information about the exhibition and related events.

 

ARTES Event: Curator’s Tour of ‘Ribera: Art of Violence,’ at Dulwich Picture Gallery, 28 September 2018

ribera-apollo-and-marsyas-banner

ARTES members are invited to join ARTES’s committee member Dr Edward Payne for a special tour of the exhibition Ribera: Art of Violence at Dulwich Picture Gallery, co-curated by Edward and ARTES member Dr Xavier Bray.

The curator-led tour will take place in the morning of Friday 28 September. The event will run as follows:

9.00–9.15 Coffee and welcome at Gail’s, 91 Dulwich Village, London SE21 7BJ, UK

9.15–9.45 Introduction: Why Ribera? Why violence? Why Dulwich Picture Gallery?

9.45–10.00 Private viewing of the exhibition at Dulwich Picture Gallery (doors open to the general public at 10.00)

10.00–11.30 Curator-led tour of the exhibition followed by Q&A and general discussion

This event is free but spaces are limited. Please write to artesiberia@gmail.com to book your place.

01613386710_h-british-museum-cropped-large-banner

Ribera: Art of Violence is the first exhibition in the UK dedicated to the Spanish Baroque painter, draughtsman and printmaker Jusepe de Ribera (1591–1652). Born in Játiva, Valencia, Ribera emigrated to Italy as a young artist. Proud of his Spanish heritage, he eventually settled in Naples, then a Spanish territory, but never again returned to Spain. A hybrid figure, Ribera had a significant influence on the art of both countries in the seventeenth century.

Introducing this artist to a UK audience, the exhibition will focus on some of Ribera’s most powerful images featuring saints and sinners, flaying and flogging. Ribera’s images of pain have often been described as shocking and even grotesque in their realism. In a common historiographical trope, the artist himself has been labelled as sadistic and violent. Challenging this long-standing interpretation, Ribera: Art of Violence will reveal the complex artistic, religious and cultural discourses underpinning the artist’s violent imagery in paint and on paper. This exploration will be anchored by a number of major loans from North American and European collections, with some works travelling to the UK for the first time.

Click here for more information about the exhibition and related events.

 

Featured Exhibition: Gala Salvador Dalí: A Room of One’s Own in Púbol, Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya, Barcelona, until 14 October

gala_placidia_esferes

Salvador Dalí. Gala Placidia. Galatea of the Spheres, 1952. Fundació Gala- Salvador Dalí, Figueres © Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, VEGAP, Barcelona, 2018

Gala (7th September 1894 – 10th June 1982), born into a family of intellectuals from Kazan (Russia), spent her childhood in Moscow before moving to Switzerland and then Paris. There she befriended such prominent members of the surrealist movement as Max Ernst. In 1929 she travelled to Cadaqués, where she met Dalí. The two fell in love and started to live together, first during an eight-year exile in the United States and then in Portlligat, New York and Paris.

Gala, an enigmatic and intuitive lady famous as Salvador Dalí’s wife, muse and model, is the subject of this exhibition. Abandoning traditional stereotypes on the role of this figure, the show follows her transformation into a fully-fledged artist, exploring her artistic cooperation with Dalí and revealing the possible shared authorship of some works.

Click here for more information.

Featured Exhibition: Michel Sittow. Estonian Painter at the Courts of Renaissance Europe, until 16 September at The Kumu Museum, Tallinn

michel_sittow_002

Born in Tallinn, Michel Sittow, studied in the studio of his father Clawes van der Sittow, a respected painter and wood carver. In 1484, the young artist headed to Bruges, the art centre of the Netherlands at the time, probably to work in the studio of Hans Memling, a German who was the town’s most sought-after master. There he learned the illusionist technique typical of the Netherlandish school of painting.

From 1492 to 1504, Michel Sittow was in the service of Isabella of Castile, and later worked as a portraitist for Philip the Handsome, Margaret of Austria, Ferdinand of Aragon and Christian II of Denmark. Sittow returned to his home-town of Tallinn, first in 1506 in connection with an inheritance dispute, when he joined the local artists’ guild. In 1514, Sittow left for Copenhagen at the invitation of King Christian II, and from there he went on to Spain and the Netherlands. The famous portraitist returned to Tallinn for good in early 1518.
With his diverse heritage (a family with German and Finnish-Swedish roots living in Tallinn) and cosmopolitan career, Sittow did not fit in with the national narrative of art history that prevailed in the first half of the 20th century. However, his cosmopolitan career is all the more relevant in the current European context.

The international exhibition project, which includes multi-faceted collaboration with centres in Europe and the United States, brings Sittow’s extraordinary works from distinguished museums and private collection to his first solo exhibition. This is a unique platform for a broader introduction and further research on the oeuvre of this remarkable artist. Most of Sittow’s small number of works (20 to 25 paintings) are on exhibit, thereby providing an excellent survey of his work as a portraitist and painter of religious works. It also allows us to view his art in a broader context, including in collaboration with Juan de Flandes and other contemporary Netherlandish artists. In addition to the paintings, another section of the exhibition is comprised of a timeline that provides an overview of the 500-year story of Michel Sittow, from his birth and successful career to his fall into oblivion and rediscovery.

The exhibition, which is a collaborative project of the Art Museum of Estonia and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, will take place in 2018 in celebration of the centenary of the Republic of Estonia. This year also marks 500 years since Michel Sittow’s final return to his home-town of Tallinn.

Click here for more details.